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View Full Version : OT - Excited about my Space Presentation to my Kids Day Care Center during their Space Week!


broncosteven
07-26-2012, 03:08 AM
The teachers knew Carl had brought in all sorts of Space books for book days and they heard him talk about the Saturn V he saw on our trip so I told them I could do a short (1,2,6,or 8 hour) Discussion on the Space Program!

I am going to start with Verne, Wells, And Bradbury (since he just died) and go over overviews of how we got from the Wright Brothers Flyer in 1903 through to Freedom 7 then what Mecury/Gemini/Apollo were to the trouble we had with Apollo 1 and 13 and how we discovered how the moon came into being.

I will also go over the Skylab, Mir, IIS and the robotic mission Curiosity that lands August 6th and Voyager's 1 & 2, Maybe Cassini and other robotic missions before getting back to the shuttle program and a big finish with the new SLS Platform that will happen in their lifetimes.

I am going to use my CM/SM/LM toy to show how the Saturn V took off from the Earth and fired the last stage to get out of Earth orbit and on to the Moon (Trans Lunar injection) and then braked for moon orbit on the dark side then landed then returned to the CM then fired the SM rocket to perform the Trans-Earth injection then broke though the atsmophere and landed in the ocean.

Going to be lots of fun for me an hopefully I have enough things to keep them interactive during the presentation.

Of Course there will be a chapter about why Gene Kranz is such a stud and how the Astronauts would be lost without him.

Let me know if I left anything out!

BroncsRule
07-26-2012, 11:56 AM
IMO you should mention Hubble - how it was launched with faulty optics & the shuttle flight to fix it - and what we've been able to learn with it.

DivineLegion
07-26-2012, 12:16 PM
Hubble and James Webb. Essential!

DivineLegion
07-26-2012, 12:21 PM
Oh, and you absolutely have to mention SOHO. The leading edge of astro and helio physics rests on the continued success of SOHO. Heck, climatology is starting to focus on solar cycles for indications of weather, and geologists are studying solar conditions for early signs of earthquakes.

tsiguy96
07-27-2012, 05:31 AM
8 hour presentation is short?!?!

broncosteven, just because i dont know and im sure you mentioned it before, are you affiliated with the space program or just love it and the history of it?

cmhargrove
07-27-2012, 06:14 AM
Just remember that younger kids like to see stuff, touch stuff, and do stuff. Listening, not so much. Come up with a little space activity or craft, and they will love you forever.

Good luck with the presentation, I hope you inspire a new generation of astronauts!

brncs_fan
07-27-2012, 06:46 AM
http://www.thenayshun.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/sleeping-kids-2_1.bmp

Boobs McGee
07-27-2012, 07:35 AM
Go get em man!!!

bronco militia
07-27-2012, 08:26 AM
http://www.thenayshun.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/sleeping-kids-2_1.bmp

lol....I feel the same way when reading camp reports. ;D

Los Broncos
07-27-2012, 08:38 AM
This should be a sticky.

SouthStndJunkie
07-27-2012, 09:03 AM
8 hours to a bunch of kids in day care?

Good luck with that.

I'd try to keep it at an hour or less, as kids in day care have the attention span of gnats.

loborugger
07-27-2012, 09:24 AM
8 hours to a bunch of kids in day care?

Good luck with that.

I'd try to keep it at an hour or less, as kids in day care have the attention span of gnats.

This.

Or 8 hours given in chunks over a period of weeks.

Also, don't forget to tell them about the sound studio in Pasadena where they recorded the faked moon landing. :)

BroncsRule
07-27-2012, 10:20 AM
When my son was in grade school, I had made a 1:36 model of the ISS, & I brought it in & did about 1/2 hour powerpoint on ISS mostly - with some "best of hubble" slides thrown in for good measure.

This was for 4th graders. It went pretty well, & the teacher had me back to do it for all the 4th & 5th grade classes. I had a blast doing it!

Preschoolers would be tough, though. Good luck Steven!

Chris
07-27-2012, 10:33 AM
That's cool. I think you need to be conscious of time and framing content in a way that they're going to enjoy.

Or maybe you should just get MacGruder to talk about space.

ghwk
07-27-2012, 10:50 AM
I'd just show them the Star Trek episode where Captain Kirk goes back in time and saves the space program.

That'll get them off on the right foot. To heck with this Gene Krantz stuff. :wave:

broncosteven
07-27-2012, 11:05 AM
Just remember that younger kids like to see stuff, touch stuff, and do stuff. Listening, not so much. Come up with a little space activity or craft, and they will love you forever.

Good luck with the presentation, I hope you inspire a new generation of astronauts!

I figured that out quick, I adapted dumping most of the stuff I was going to talk about and moved on the models I had.

I had one kid stand in a spot as the earth and another one stand 10 feet away as the moon then explained the Saturn V stages and explained how it got into orbit and how they did the orbital checkouts then fired the last stage for the moon and I circled around in the right TLI figure 8 path to the kid who was the moon and using my CSM/LM model I showed how they landed and took off and came home.

That was probably the biggest deal to the kids, and the time they were the most quiet and interested.

I also just took an old water bottle in and explained the fuel tank and how the engines worked and that when the tanks were empty they jettisoned them so they could save weight and make the ship faster.

It lasted about 45 mintues before I ran out of things to show and the kids got antsy.

I was happy to get a couple good questions which showed some of them were listening.

Very fun time, and I made use of what I had around the house.

broncosteven
07-27-2012, 11:10 AM
8 hour presentation is short?!?!

broncosteven, just because i dont know and im sure you mentioned it before, are you affiliated with the space program or just love it and the history of it?

Just love it, I remember watching Apollo 17 on TV. I ended up getting into Computers and networking and after getting burned out on Certification books went back and started reading NASA history because it was something from my childhood, plus around that time there were a lot of new bio's that came out like Chris Craft's "Flight" and Gene's book "Failure is not an option". Plus who could forget the Apollo 13 movie!

cmhargrove
07-27-2012, 11:19 AM
I figured that out quick, I adapted dumping most of the stuff I was going to talk about and moved on the models I had.

I had one kid stand in a spot as the earth and another one stand 10 feet away as the moon then explained the Saturn V stages and explained how it got into orbit and how they did the orbital checkouts then fired the last stage for the moon and I circled around in the right TLI figure 8 path to the kid who was the moon and using my CSM/LM model I showed how they landed and took off and came home.

That was probably the biggest deal to the kids, and the time they were the most quiet and interested.

I also just took an old water bottle in and explained the fuel tank and how the engines worked and that when the tanks were empty they jettisoned them so they could save weight and make the ship faster.

It lasted about 45 mintues before I ran out of things to show and the kids got antsy.

I was happy to get a couple good questions which showed some of them were listening.

Very fun time, and I made use of what I had around the house.

Sounds like it went great.

I find that kids of all ages also love trying their hand at two-liter water rockets. Have you ever tried those? We got the kids at my son's school so interested that the science teacher started making it into a competition each year. They are pretty easy to make, and the kids get to learn about power/weight ratios, basic rocket designs, etc. then put it all to use.

broncosteven
07-27-2012, 11:19 AM
I'd just show them the Star Trek episode where Captain Kirk goes back in time and saves the space program.

That'll get them off on the right foot. To heck with this Gene Krantz stuff. :wave:

LOL

I did think about bringing my old Dinky metal Enterprise toy as a joke but was afraid I would confuse them. I do regret not bringing it now because they would have enjoyed seeing it.

Funny you mention "Assignment Earth" I just rewatched it with my daughter and forgot they used stock footage of one of the Saturn V test launches (Apollo 2-6) as Apollo was shutdown in 1967 after the Apollo1 Fire. Anyway to make a long story longer they used a camera angle from the LOX tank to pad 38A where the Saturn was stacked, we went on the VAB tour in June and the bus took us to the same point and we got some pictures of what is left of the Shuttle gantry with the LOX tower in it. I nearly did a spit take when I saw that shot as we were just there.

broncosteven
07-27-2012, 11:31 AM
Sounds like it went great.

I find that kids of all ages also love trying their hand at two-liter water rockets. Have you ever tried those? We got the kids at my son's school so interested that the science teacher started making it into a competition each year. They are pretty easy to make, and the kids get to learn about power/weight ratios, basic rocket designs, etc. then put it all to use.

That was the reason I used the water bottle I was going to tell them they could make a rocket out of it but I had to switch gears and go right to the demo of the stages and liftoff because they were getting antsy. They were so antsy I forgot to have them help me with the countdown for liftoff but no one seemed to mind.

I also wanted to make a model of the Spuntink but I don't think they would have understood it anyway the best part was when I had them help me and when I showed off the set of model car sized rockets we bought him at KSC. I did tell the teacher afterwards that they could spend craft time making their own satellites and use their imaginations.

I kept trying to tell them to imagine their own space adventures and that maybe some of them would be interested enough that they might someday be a part of the SLS program... if it doesn't get cut.

ghwk
07-27-2012, 11:55 AM
As a follow up just blow some **** up just like the footage of all our rockets in the beginning of the Right Stuff.

They'll love that.

Bronco Yoda
07-27-2012, 01:16 PM
Don't forget to wear a snappy vest!

broncosteven
07-27-2012, 01:17 PM
Don't forget to wear a snappy vest!

I wish I thought of that sooner!

LOL

Mogulseeker
07-27-2012, 01:46 PM
The teachers knew Carl had brought in all sorts of Space books for book days and they heard him talk about the Saturn V he saw on our trip so I told them I could do a short (1,2,6,or 8 hour) Discussion on the Space Program!

I am going to start with Verne, Wells, And Bradbury (since he just died) and go over overviews of how we got from the Wright Brothers Flyer in 1903 through to Freedom 7 then what Mecury/Gemini/Apollo were to the trouble we had with Apollo 1 and 13 and how we discovered how the moon came into being.

I will also go over the Skylab, Mir, IIS and the robotic mission Curiosity that lands August 6th and Voyager's 1 & 2, Maybe Cassini and other robotic missions before getting back to the shuttle program and a big finish with the new SLS Platform that will happen in their lifetimes.

I am going to use my CM/SM/LM toy to show how the Saturn V took off from the Earth and fired the last stage to get out of Earth orbit and on to the Moon (Trans Lunar injection) and then braked for moon orbit on the dark side then landed then returned to the CM then fired the SM rocket to perform the Trans-Earth injection then broke though the atsmophere and landed in the ocean.

Going to be lots of fun for me an hopefully I have enough things to keep them interactive during the presentation.

Of Course there will be a chapter about why Gene Kranz is such a stud and how the Astronauts would be lost without him.

Let me know if I left anything out!

I wanna see the presentation. My dad is a physicist/geologist. He worked in petroleum (environmental management) but he loves the space stuff.

I want to learn more about the astrophysics stuff. I've been up to my ears in stats, calc and trig because I'm trying to start my Phd in Econ (applied to Georgetown, DU and Maastricht Uni in the Netherlands) and I didn't do well enough in Math on the entrance exam to start at this fall. It sucks.

Tombstone RJ
07-27-2012, 01:54 PM
http://www.thenayshun.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/sleeping-kids-2_1.bmp

LOL

Tombstone RJ
07-27-2012, 01:59 PM
Did you talk about the future of NASA and the space program or did you not go there? I understand if you didn't want to end the show on a down note.

broncosteven
07-27-2012, 02:19 PM
Did you talk about the future of NASA and the space program or did you not go there? I understand if you didn't want to end the show on a down note.

I did mention the SLS and that they could one day be the 1st astronauts or support personnel or contractors who go back to the moon, Mars, or hopefully Titan and Europa.

I was deeply depressed about the shutdown of the Shuttle program and that there didn't seem to be a big push to get human's anywhere outside orbit but after going to KSC and hearing the pitch about SLS and reading more up on it I feel better about it.

Apparently Obama's white house wanted to leave orbital business to private contractors and use NASA for deep space missions.

We saw the new platform the SLS will be built on and they had the Gantry built for the Constellation program which was cancelled for SLS but the Orion Capsule and Service module are the same. 2014 was supposed to be the 1st test launch with a manned test flight for 2017ish if there are no funding setbacks. Maybe I feel better because I saw the hardware and no longer believe it will just be people talking to get votes and they have actually built hardware.

BTW Just last week the SLS program passed an agency review and is moving on to perliminary design phase http://www.sacbee.com/2012/07/25/4659806/nasas-space-launch-system-passes.html

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/

It is almost like being back in the pre Shuttle days while they design and implement the hardware that will take us back to the Moon and beyond.

Just sucks to wait that long and hope it is not vaporware due to funding cuts.

Mogulseeker
07-27-2012, 02:22 PM
I did mention the SLS and that they could one day be the 1st astronauts or support personnel or contractors who go back to the moon, Mars, or hopefully Titan and Europa.

I was deeply depressed about the shutdown of the Shuttle program and that there didn't seem to be a big push to get human's anywhere outside orbit but after going to KSC and hearing the pitch about SLS and reading more up on it I feel better about it.

Apparently Obama's white house wanted to leave orbital business to private contractors and use NASA for deep space missions.

We saw the new platform the SLS will be built on and they had the Gantry built for the Constellation program which was cancelled for SLS but the Orion Capsule and Service module are the same. 2014 was supposed to be the 1st test launch with a manned test flight for 2017ish if there are no funding setbacks. Maybe I feel better because I saw the hardware and no longer believe it will just be people talking to get votes and they have actually built hardware.

BTW Just last week the SLS program passed an agency review and is moving on to perliminary design phase http://www.sacbee.com/2012/07/25/4659806/nasas-space-launch-system-passes.html

http://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/

It is almost like being back in the pre Shuttle days while they design and implement the hardware that will take us back to the Moon and beyond.

Just sucks to wait that long and hope it is not vaporware due to funding cuts.

I did an expose on Elon Musk in a venture capital class I took in college. Interesting day in age with SpaceX.

broncosteven
07-27-2012, 02:23 PM
I wanna see the presentation. My dad is a physicist/geologist. He worked in petroleum (environmental management) but he loves the space stuff.

I want to learn more about the astrophysics stuff. I've been up to my ears in stats, calc and trig because I'm trying to start my Phd in Econ (applied to Georgetown, DU and Maastricht Uni in the Netherlands) and I didn't do well enough in Math on the entrance exam to start at this fall. It sucks.

I think I would be able to cover a lot more ground presenting it to you and your dad. I didn't even do a power point because it was 3-12 year olds and I didn't want to be fiddling with slides.

I did type up some notes to make sure I got some dates right and for talking points but that got ditched fast.

I did find it was very fun to talk about something I have learned alot about and I am a much better public speaker.

Only downside was my back and neck started tightening up after sitting on the tinny chairs they had so I was glad it only went about 45 minutes.

broncosteven
07-27-2012, 02:29 PM
I did an expose on Elon Musk in a venture capital class I took in college. Interesting day in age with SpaceX.

Yes, Elton is the kind of person who is going to propel new technology's and do the other hard things because no one else wants to.

He nearly went bust with Tesla Motors but pulled that out.

I don't know how he is going to make space flight cheaper using traditional designs and practices other than not having to deal with the bureaucracy of a government.

I am a bigger fan of Rutan and his Scaled Composites, I always loved the X-15 program (one of my favorite books is "At the Edge of Space" by Milt Thompson. Neil Armstrong was an X-15 pilot. We could not have gone to the moon on the X-15 platform but we could do a lot of sub orbital and orbital stuff with it so it is nice to see Virgin Galactic take up that hardware platform.

We live in the age of the super rich building rockets instead of concert halls.