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View Full Version : Baseball Cards Makes Me Sad.


houghtam
07-24-2012, 12:54 AM
Baseball cards are just not popular anymore. And that really makes me sad. Not only did you have your Ken Griffey Jr.s and Barry Bonds and Will Clarks, but you also had the ones with the funny names, like Bucky Dent, or Yogi Berra, or...Bo Diaz. Or even the mediocre ones who were never anything special. The only reason I knew R.J. Reynolds or Chuck Crim ever existed is because I HAD TWELVE OF THEM. Damn you Beckett!! $.05 for a "Common Card"? I couldn't GIVE those things away. I think it's also apropos to mention that R.J. Reynolds sounds like a tobacco company (OH WAIT! IT IS!), and Chuck Crim sounds like...well, you can imagine. Eeesh.

Which reminds me: I wonder if ever, in the history of the sport, a roster decision has been made where the deciding factor was the sound of some guy's name. And I'm not talking about guys with real skill here, I'm talking about marginal guys who probably should have never made the roster in the first place. I mean, do you think some guy sat down and thought, "Nook Logan...HELL YEAH!!"

Archer81
07-24-2012, 01:50 AM
I think the novelty factor of having a picture of a player is gone. Stats are easily obtained on the web. TV, tablets and internet pretty much have filled that niche. Plus, you dont have to cut down some trees and junk to print out cards that generally are never worth very much.

:Broncos:

ol#7
07-24-2012, 01:55 AM
My first big collecting bug was football cards. Then baseball/basketball etc. At one point in time they really captured my imagination. In part that changed when I discovered comic books, especially as the prices of cards skyrocketed. Plus there became so many companies making cards at one point, I remember when it was mostly Topps, you would see a few Fleer and Donruss, but that was it. Plus you used to get gum and like 18 cards a pack. The last pack I bought in the early 90's had like 5 or 6 cards, with special foil editions etc. They went away from marketing to kids IMO.

houghtam
07-24-2012, 01:56 AM
I think the novelty factor of having a picture of a player is gone. Stats are easily obtained on the web. TV, tablets and internet pretty much have filled that niche. Plus, you dont have to cut down some trees and junk to print out cards that generally are never worth very much.

:Broncos:

Yeah, but who collected for the money? I mean, yeah the hope was always there with every new cellophane or wax-wrapped pack of petrified gum and collection of cardboard goodness, but for me it was all about getting them out and memorizing them. Counting them. Comparing collections. Trying to collect them all without cheating, which meant saving up all summer and buying the entire set in a box as opposed to wasting your money every weekend buying pack after pack after pack.

TheChamp24
07-24-2012, 07:16 AM
The days of collecting and building sets, etc. are generally gone. You don't buy a box of cards in hopes of getting a set to store away.
The 1980's and 1990's saw overproduced cards flooding the market.

And the monetary value of cards has gone UP. Take a look at how much a Bryce Harper autograph from 2011 Bowman goes for, or a Mike Trout auto from 2009 Bowman Draft.
See how much Cam Newton sells for, Andrew Luck, Robert Griffin. They OUTSELL Elway, Montana, Marino, etc.
Its due to it not for kids anymore, but adults with pockets of money. People don't want just a base card, they want an autograph and a sweet looking patch from a jersey on the card.

bfoflcommish
07-24-2012, 08:05 AM
what ^^^ said. Cards are still huge, my sons and I buy them alot. its just they are no longer $.25 - $1.00 a pack, its more like $5.00 - $50.00 but some of the stuff you can pull is amazing.

Just last year I bought my son a box of cards for $100...keep in mind this is 6 packs, haha he pulled out a dual autograph card of tebow and elway. guy offered him $500 on spot, he took. turned around bought another box, pulled out another elway auto, a von miller jersey patch auto'd and tons of other relic cards. still fun to collect its just no longer affordable, thats the sad part

Requiem
07-24-2012, 08:20 AM
Haha, right on Houghtam.

I am still going through my collection sorting people out.

I bought my first pack of cards in years yesterday. I got Bobby Wagner and Joe Adams rookie cards for the NFL this year. What a waste of money. Oh, I also got a DJ Williams card. Who wants it?

Everyone else was pretty much a loser.

broncocalijohn
07-24-2012, 11:40 AM
Card collecting is nothing like I remember. I used to write down the codes of the order that cards were in rack packs. I can see (as anyone) what three cards were showing and tell you to about 90% who was below that card. I was hauling in rookie and star cards worth much more than the $1.50- $2 the rack pack cost. Going down to 7-11 on lunch from school on a Wednesday to get the 1988 Donruss packs. All good times and sad those cards are worth much less than what I paid and it is 25 years later! I collected from 1975 (Twinkie and Ding Dong cards) and then started the Topps collection in 1978. Once Beckett yearly came out in 1982(or at least that is when I got it), I became fascinated with collecting and did so until 1989. After that, I would buy Angels or Broncos cards but cared more about memorabilia that could be hung up and looked at every day.
Spring forward to June of this year and my two sons (9 and 8) want to start collecting more than just Angels team sets we get every year. They buy the cheapy bulk group first for a $1 (hell, I have those same cards I spent probably $8 for!) and now want the Trumbos, Trouts, Nolan Ryan, etc. I even pick up some Trout cards then knowing they will be going up (wish I picked up a 09 Bowman!) and tell them to do the same. It is fun they want to collect like I did and surprised they want some of the old timers that they never saw.... COOL!

Pseudofool
07-24-2012, 01:56 PM
The internet killed the radio star, er, baseball card hobbie.

broncosteven
07-24-2012, 02:40 PM
The days of collecting and building sets, etc. are generally gone. You don't buy a box of cards in hopes of getting a set to store away.
The 1980's and 1990's saw overproduced cards flooding the market.

And the monetary value of cards has gone UP. Take a look at how much a Bryce Harper autograph from 2011 Bowman goes for, or a Mike Trout auto from 2009 Bowman Draft.
....

Is my Steve Trout and Rich Dotson autograph from 1982/83 worth anything? White Sox used to have a spot in old Comisky you could go to and get autographs of rookies and Minnie Minoso I know I have Doston's autograph somewhere but I tossed the polaroid I took with him because I thought he was just some rook at the time.

Never did baseball cards but I have box full of Football cards from about 1975-about 1983.

broncocalijohn
07-24-2012, 03:46 PM
The internet killed the radio star, er, baseball card hobbie.

Let me know when you can flip through a stack of internet cards. THey tried the download card a few years back and I don't think it really worked. Electronic cards suck because you can get the picture online for free.

I know of 4 Card shops in Orange County now. There were probably 20 in the hey days.

houghtam
07-24-2012, 03:54 PM
Let me know when you can flip through a stack of internet cards. THey tried the download card a few years back and I don't think it really worked. Electronic cards suck because you can get the picture online for free.

I know of 4 Card shops in Orange County now. There were probably 20 in the hey days.

Yeah, there's nothing like "got it got it got it need it got it need it" when it comes to card collecting. I always preferred getting my cards out and handling them to storing them for value.

Smiling Assassin27
07-24-2012, 04:16 PM
friend of mine used his Nolan Ryan rookie card as a noisemaker in the spokes of his bike. we never let him live that one down.

broncocalijohn
07-24-2012, 04:32 PM
friend of mine used his Nolan Ryan rookie card as a noisemaker in the spokes of his bike. we never let him live that one down.

We played flipper off of the wall of the house. When we figured out you can slide it across the concrete to land on more cards, we went that route. You can see all the "flipped" cards now because they have massive scuff marks on them.

Blart
07-24-2012, 04:37 PM
I always thought my Elway rookie card would be worth $100's someday, if he could only win a Super Bowl. Montana's was over $100, after all.

Thanks to Ebay, it's sunk to about $25.

SonOfLe-loLang
07-24-2012, 06:26 PM
I always thought my Elway rookie card would be worth $100's someday, if he could only win a Super Bowl. Montana's was over $100, after all.

Thanks to Ebay, it's sunk to about $25.

Wow, thats all its worth now eh?

broncocalijohn
07-24-2012, 08:27 PM
I always thought my Elway rookie card would be worth $100's someday, if he could only win a Super Bowl. Montana's was over $100, after all.

Thanks to Ebay, it's sunk to about $25.

Glad I bought 50 of them for $.75 each around 1988. Football cards weren't so cool back then. SHould have sold most of them after the Super Bowl.

SPORTSWRITER
07-25-2012, 05:17 AM
Baseball cards are just not popular anymore. And that really makes me sad. Not only did you have your Ken Griffey Jr.s and Barry Bonds and Will Clarks, but you also had the ones with the funny names, like Bucky Dent, or Yogi Berra, or...Bo Diaz. Or even the mediocre ones who were never anything special. The only reason I knew R.J. Reynolds or Chuck Crim ever existed is because I HAD TWELVE OF THEM. Damn you Beckett!! $.05 for a "Common Card"? I couldn't GIVE those things away. I think it's also apropos to mention that R.J. Reynolds sounds like a tobacco company (OH WAIT! IT IS!), and Chuck Crim sounds like...well, you can imagine. Eeesh.

Which reminds me: I wonder if ever, in the history of the sport, a roster decision has been made where the deciding factor was the sound of some guy's name. And I'm not talking about guys with real skill here, I'm talking about marginal guys who probably should have never made the roster in the first place. I mean, do you think some guy sat down and thought, "Nook Logan...HELL YEAH!!"

It's hard to imagine anyone naming their kid "Milton Bradley." Still not as bad as "Richard Head" though! How could parents do that to a child?? Back in the 60's, I remember nearly choking when I got a card named "Jesus Alou," not knowing at the time that it was pronounced "Hey-Zooss."

Smiling Assassin27
07-25-2012, 08:48 AM
I always thought my Elway rookie card would be worth $100's someday, if he could only win a Super Bowl. Montana's was over $100, after all.

Thanks to Ebay, it's sunk to about $25.

Wow, my Ichiro rookie's selling for around $35. I imagine it'll climb once he gets to the HOF.