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Mogulseeker
06-11-2012, 03:20 PM
OK so I found this badass stainless steel Krups Espresso Machine at Arc fo $12. Obviously I bought it because these things run from $300-600.

The only problem is the boiler is backed up with calc.... I don't want to run the thing because the calc has clogged the foaming valve, and that might totally destroy the machine if I try it (not to mention a bad day for me if the pressure chamber explodes in my face).

I tried pouring vinegar in the boiler and let it sit for a couple weeks. That gout out a ton of it but the interior of the machine still has some calc that I cannot get off. The machine is static, so it would be hard to take the thing apart and descale the parts with a wire brush, but that might be what I'd have to do.

Any ideas on how to descale an espresso boiler?

kappys
06-11-2012, 03:26 PM
OK so I found this badass stainless steel Krups Espresso Machine at Arc fo $12. Obviously I bought it because these things run from $300-600.

The only problem is the boiler is backed up with calc.... I don't want to run the thing because the calc has clogged the foaming valve, and that might totally destroy the machine if I try it (not to mention a bad day for me if the pressure chamber explodes in my face).

I tried pouring vinegar in the boiler and let it sit for a couple weeks. That gout out a ton of it but the interior of the machine still has some calc that I cannot get off. The machine is static, so it would be hard to take the thing apart and descale the parts with a wire brush, but that might be what I'd have to do.

Any ideas on how to descale an espresso boiler?

By calc do you mean calcium? - I would put some lye in there(not too strong) and run it through then flush it really well

DenverBrit
06-11-2012, 03:34 PM
Save yourself the aggravation and get one of these.

Makes great espresso that most machines can't compete with. And you can take it on trips, ;)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31TNP0DGY4L.jpg


http://www.amazon.com/Aerobie-AeroPress-Coffee-Espresso-Maker/dp/B0047BIWSK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1339450341&sr=8-1&keywords=aeropress

JJG
06-11-2012, 04:02 PM
an aeropress is nice, but it doesn't make espresso

Tombstone RJ
06-11-2012, 04:08 PM
By calc do you mean calcium? - I would put some lye in there(not too strong) and run it through then flush it really well

There's a cleaner that specifically breaks down calcium deposits but I can't remember the name of the stuff right now. Anyhow, if you can find this stuff I'd run it through the esspresso machine and then yes, flush it out with some good filtered/bottled water.

Then moving forward, I'd only use filtered or bottled water in the machine so as to limit the calcium deposits in the future.

Mogulseeker
06-11-2012, 04:39 PM
There's a cleaner that specifically breaks down calcium deposits but I can't remember the name of the stuff right now. Anyhow, if you can find this stuff I'd run it through the esspresso machine and then yes, flush it out with some good filtered/bottled water.

Then moving forward, I'd only use filtered or bottled water in the machine so as to limit the calcium deposits in the future.

Problem averted, lol.

I went to Williams and Sonoma over at Aspen Grove and they got me the calcium cleaning liquid.

Mogulseeker
06-11-2012, 05:18 PM
Anticalc kit:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Krups-Espresso-Descaling-Powder-KAF0540010-Descaler-coffee-maker-kettle-/280777608867

DenverBrit
06-11-2012, 06:12 PM
an aeropress is nice, but it doesn't make espresso

What do see as the key difference?


"When used properly, AeroPress produces a remarkably good straight espresso and an excellent Americano-style taller cup.
In fact, it produces a better espresso shot than many home machines that cost twenty or thirty times as much."
Kenneth Davids – Author of: Coffee: A Guide to Buying Brewing and enjoying
Espresso: Ultimate Coffee
Coffee Roasting: Romance and Revival
editor of coffeereview.com

Mogulseeker
06-11-2012, 06:28 PM
Save yourself the aggravation and get one of these.

Makes great espresso that most machines can't compete with. And you can take it on trips, ;)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31TNP0DGY4L.jpg


http://www.amazon.com/Aerobie-AeroPress-Coffee-Espresso-Maker/dp/B0047BIWSK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1339450341&sr=8-1&keywords=aeropress

I already have an aeropress, french press, industrial drip machine, antique drip machine, an electronic grinder, an old-school cast-iron manual grinder, and steamer.

Yes, over the years I have spent probably thousands on my coffee products.

In college, we get $200 every quarter on our flex account for incidentals around campus. I literally only bought coffee with my flex, and I always used it up before the quarter ended.

DenverBrit
06-11-2012, 06:33 PM
I already have an aeropress, french press, industrial drip machine, antique drip machine, an electronic grinder, a manual cast-iron stone grinder, and a steamer.

Yes, over the years I have spent probably thousands on my coffee products.

In college, we get $200 every quarter on our flex account for incidentals around campus. I literally only bought coffee with my flex, and I always used it up before the quarter ended.

I've also tried many different machines over the years, non of which justified the brewing and the clean up.

Finally settled into a french press and aeropress as the best all around coffee value and minimum clean up hassle.

Preference is subjective, but still better than Starbucks.

DivineLegion
06-11-2012, 07:02 PM
Mypressi twist and a hario grinder.

I was a professional Barista for 4 years, and competed frequently. Before my fiancé bought me a mypressi for Christmas, I had never tasted a good espresso shot from a home brewer. All it takes is some boiling water (I advise an electric kettle), NO or CO2 cartridges, and the mypressi. You have to master your tamp (35 pounds of pressure), and I suggest upgrading to a heavier tamp. The tamp they provide is plastic. The key to a good shot of espresso is a quality grind. If you really want to spend money you can buy an electric grinder, but I suggest a hand crank like the Harrio, or the Porlex. I personally have a Porlex ($75), and love the thing. The mypressi is either 200 or 250, and comes with cartridges. If your in the states you can find an electric kettle for under $40. A new tamp will cost you $15 on Amazon.

I'm telling you this is the best home espresso I have EVER had. My fiancé was also a Barista (that's how we met), and she agrees. Don't waste yor time with anything Krups makes, it isn't worth it.


Best place to buy beans:

Paradise coffee
Counter culture coffee
Barrington coffee roasters
Coffee by design
Crema Coffee (Cary NC)


Good luck brother.

PRBronco
06-11-2012, 07:05 PM
Do they sell this stuff in the States? Link (http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/3/HouseHome/3/CleaningToolsVacuums/SpecialtyCleaningProducts/PRD~0530342P/CLR%252B%252BCalcium%25252C%252BLime%252B%252526%2 52BRust%252BRemover%25252C%252B828%252BmL.jsp?loca le=en)

I just moved to Calgary and they have crazy hard water here, sounds like a lot of people use this to clean **** up.

Jay3
06-11-2012, 07:11 PM
I have a Jura.

Just thought I'd brag about that.

DivineLegion
06-11-2012, 07:18 PM
Do they sell this stuff in the States? Link (http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/3/HouseHome/3/CleaningToolsVacuums/SpecialtyCleaningProducts/PRD~0530342P/CLR%252B%252BCalcium%25252C%252BLime%252B%252526%2 52BRust%252BRemover%25252C%252B828%252BmL.jsp?loca le=en)

I just moved to Calgary and they have crazy hard water here, sounds like a lot of people use this to clean **** up.

We do.


If your set on fixing the thing go to Bed Bath and Beyond, and get some decalcification detergent in the coffee section.

DivineLegion
06-11-2012, 07:19 PM
I have a Jura.

Just thought I'd brag about that.

Automatic...

baja
06-11-2012, 08:13 PM
I don't know why but the Starbucks here has great coffee. I get what's called Expresso Americana

DivineLegion
06-11-2012, 09:49 PM
I don't know why but the Starbucks here has great coffee. I get what's called Expresso Americana

Cocain?

No, really though do you mean an espresso americano?

Tombstone RJ
06-11-2012, 10:36 PM
I just use a french press for my home brew. I do find that organic beans and good water make a huge difference in the taste. Of course, I like a nice strong cup of joe...

baja
06-11-2012, 10:59 PM
Cocain?

No, really though do you mean an espresso americano?

LOL Ya.



....brain fart

baja
06-11-2012, 11:00 PM
I just use a french press for my home brew. I do find that organic beans and good water make a huge difference in the taste. Of course, I like a nice strong cup of joe...

BINGO

That's the secret IMO too.

cmhargrove
06-12-2012, 07:25 AM
I don't use a "hot" espresso maker. I actually create my espresso by cold-filtering. My wife likes one strength, I like another, so it allows you to make it as you wish.

Anyway, if you haven't cold filtered, I would highly reccommend trying it. It actually brews the coffee without most of the acids. You get an extremely rich complexity, but it is also very smooth. Many people who have stomach issues also use it for that reason.

I use the "Toddy" coffee system. I've had it for several years, and I think it only costs about $40.00. I've had several other friends that are coffee snobs/officionados that absolutely love it when I pour them a cup.

DivineLegion
06-12-2012, 08:04 AM
There's a cleaner that specifically breaks down calcium deposits but I can't remember the name of the stuff right now. Anyhow, if you can find this stuff I'd run it through the esspresso machine and then yes, flush it out with some good filtered/bottled water.

Then moving forward, I'd only use filtered or bottled water in the machine so as to limit the calcium deposits in the future.

Have you ever tried a vacuum brewer? Cleanest cup of coffee you will ever try! It's not an every day sort of contraption but its great for weekends, and hosting friends. They are a little pricey (100-140), but better than every drip brewer ever made.

JJG
06-12-2012, 08:45 AM
What do see as the key difference?

Crema.

that quote is straight off the Aeropress box and is there to sell more machines.

the Aeropress can make a really nice coffee concentrate, with some espresso like characteristics, but its not true espresso. In the end, who cares as long as it taste good.

JJG
06-12-2012, 08:49 AM
I just use a french press for my home brew. I do find that organic beans and good water make a huge difference in the taste. Of course, I like a nice strong cup of joe...

I'm on the fence about organic beans personally. Biggest difference for me is freshly roasted beans (less than 2 weeks old) and grinding with a good grinder right before brewing. Water is definitely important.

BroncoBeavis
06-12-2012, 08:52 AM
I don't use a "hot" espresso maker. I actually create my espresso by cold-filtering. My wife likes one strength, I like another, so it allows you to make it as you wish.

Anyway, if you haven't cold filtered, I would highly reccommend trying it. It actually brews the coffee without most of the acids. You get an extremely rich complexity, but it is also very smooth. Many people who have stomach issues also use it for that reason.

I use the "Toddy" coffee system. I've had it for several years, and I think it only costs about $40.00. I've had several other friends that are coffee snobs/officionados that absolutely love it when I pour them a cup.

I've been meaning to try cold filtering. Figured I could try it with a couple of jars and coffee filters just to see what it's like.

But I don't know if you could call anything cold-filtered an 'espresso'

I think heat is by definition part of the espresso process. And I can't imagine the flavor profile from pressure and heat extraction would be anything like steeping coffee in cold water.

But like I said, I'll give it a try one of these days.

DenverBrit
06-12-2012, 08:56 AM
Crema.

that quote is straight off the Aeropress box and is there to sell more machines.

the Aeropress can make a really nice coffee concentrate, with some espresso like characteristics, but its not true espresso. In the end, who cares as long as it taste good.

Yes, and Yes. :thumbsup:

Tombstone RJ
06-12-2012, 09:14 AM
Have you ever tried a vacuum brewer? Cleanest cup of coffee you will ever try! It's not an every day sort of contraption but its great for weekends, and hosting friends. They are a little pricey (100-140), but better than every drip brewer ever made.

No I haven't but that is interesting, thanks for the info!

baja
06-12-2012, 09:35 AM
I've been meaning to try cold filtering. Figured I could try it with a couple of jars and coffee filters just to see what it's like.

But I don't know if you could call anything cold-filtered an 'espresso'

I think heat is by definition part of the espresso process. And I can't imagine the flavor profile from pressure and heat extraction would be anything like steeping coffee in cold water.

But like I said, I'll give it a try one of these days.

I have a friend that does that. The coffee is just OK IMO.

BroncoBeavis
06-12-2012, 10:02 AM
I have a friend that does that. The coffee is just OK IMO.

Always figured it'd be good for iced coffee in the summer. I'm always less into a hot cup when it's 90 degrees outside.

maher_tyler
06-12-2012, 10:27 AM
Keurig...anyone have/try one of these? Heard they're pretty kick ass. Where do you get organic beans?? What would be the easiest and best thing to use to brew some good coffee??

cmhargrove
06-12-2012, 10:36 AM
I've been meaning to try cold filtering. Figured I could try it with a couple of jars and coffee filters just to see what it's like.

But I don't know if you could call anything cold-filtered an 'espresso'

I think heat is by definition part of the espresso process. And I can't imagine the flavor profile from pressure and heat extraction would be anything like steeping coffee in cold water.

But like I said, I'll give it a try one of these days.

When using a cold filtering system, you end up with a nice caraffe of super-smooth coffee concentrate. Generally this is stored in the fridge, and you get out the caraffe when you want a cup. If you poured it straight and heated it, it might be the strongest cup of coffee you have ever had (it will surely make even expeienced coffee drinkers extremely "caffeinated" for the rest of the day). The main idea, however, is that you mix it with hot water to your desired strength. The Toddy instructions mention a 1:3 or 1:4 mixture, but I always seem to like a 1:1 mixture. It is extremely smooth, robust, and easy to prepare. One caraffe generally gets used over the course of a week.

Anyway, i'm not sure if just using coffee filters will do the same thing. Generally, I let my grounds steep overnight, then strain the next morning. The filter used in the toddy system is a fibrous filter about one centimeter thick.

About the definition of espresso, that is probably just semantics. My frineds that are most experienced with my cold filtered coffee are the types that spend several dollars a day on "good" espresso and coffee from local shops. Anyway, it's pretty cheap as far as coffee gizmos go, so I thought I would reccommend.

BroncoBeavis
06-12-2012, 10:41 AM
When using a cold filtering system, you end up with a nice caraffe of super-smooth coffee concentrate. Generally this is stored in the fridge, and you get out the caraffe when you want a cup. If you poured it straight and heated it, it might be the strongest cup of coffee you have ever had (it will surely make even expeienced coffee drinkers extremely "caffeinated" for the rest of the day). The main idea, however, is that you mix it with hot water to your desired strength. The Toddy instructions mention a 1:3 or 1:4 mixture, but I always seem to like a 1:1 mixture. It is extremely smooth, robust, and easy to prepare. One caraffe generally gets used over the course of a week.

Anyway, i'm not sure if just using coffee filters will do the same thing. Generally, I let my grounds steep overnight, then strain the next morning. The filter used in the toddy system is a fibrous filter about one centimeter thick.

About the definition of espresso, that is probably just semantics. My frineds that are most experienced with my cold filtered coffee are the types that spend several dollars a day on "good" espresso and coffee from local shops. Anyway, it's pretty cheap as far as coffee gizmos go, so I thought I would reccommend.

Maybe you could just pass the coffee through a mugmate filter or something like that. Been meaning to get one of those too.

JJG
06-12-2012, 11:06 AM
Always figured it'd be good for iced coffee in the summer. I'm always less into a hot cup when it's 90 degrees outside.

this.

I like the cold brew method for iced coffee in the summer.

baja
06-12-2012, 11:09 AM
What are some of your favorite brands of coffee?

I like "Kick Ass" from Canada http://kickinghorsecoffee.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=75

Next is Peet's Coffee. http://www.peets.com/fvpage.asp?rdir=1&

Those are my top two.

alkemical
06-12-2012, 11:17 AM
What are some of your favorite brands of coffee?

I like "Kick Ass" from Canada http://kickinghorsecoffee.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=75

Next is Peet's Coffee. http://www.peets.com/fvpage.asp?rdir=1&

Those are my top two.

http://saintthomasroasters.keshikusa.com/


Javahead from St Thomas roasters - it's also used in Javahead by Troegs brewery.

maher_tyler
06-12-2012, 11:30 AM
What are some of your favorite brands of coffee?

I like "Kick Ass" from Canada http://kickinghorsecoffee.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=75

Next is Peet's Coffee. http://www.peets.com/fvpage.asp?rdir=1&

Those are my top two.

Peet's is pretty good?? They sell that at the commisary here on base..i might have to give it a try...

baja
06-12-2012, 11:36 AM
Peet's is pretty good?? They sell that at the commisary here on base..i might have to give it a try...


With any brand of coffee the most important thing is freshness.

Try to get beans that have been roasted days earlier.

Another thing is never keep your beans in the freezer. Keep them in a good quality colored glass air tight container on your counter top.

Mogulseeker
06-12-2012, 11:53 AM
If you're in Denver, Kaladi is the best.

maher_tyler
06-12-2012, 12:13 PM
With any brand of coffee the most important thing is freshness.

Try to get beans that have been roasted days earlier.

Another thing is never keep your beans in the freezer. Keep them in a good quality colored glass air tight container on your counter top.

I don't have a bean grinder man. I'll have to google a place or something here in Tucson. I also need something to brew it in or will my regualr Coffee Mate from Target work out??

baja
06-12-2012, 12:25 PM
I don't have a bean grinder man. I'll have to google a place or something here in Tucson. I also need something to brew it in or will my regualr Coffee Mate from Target work out??

I recommend a French Press. cheep and bullet proof. You can get a grinder anywhere for about 20 bucks same for the press.

JJG
06-12-2012, 12:46 PM
don't underestimate the need for a good grinder, preferably a burr grinder. The whirley blade type are better than most ground, but its hard to get a consistent grind size.
Burr grinders are more expensive but will give you more size flexibility and a more even grind, allowing for a better extracted cup of coffee.

I love my Baratza Encore grinder

baja
06-12-2012, 01:23 PM
don't underestimate the need for a good grinder, preferably a burr grinder. The whirley blade type are better than most ground, but its hard to get a consistent grind size.
Burr grinders are more expensive but will give you more size flexibility and a more even grind, allowing for a better extracted cup of coffee.

I love my Baratza Encore grinder

Thanks for the tip. I have wondered about that.

That might explain why some brews are better than others when everything else is the same.

JJG
06-12-2012, 01:48 PM
yep, blade grinders will give you boulders to dust and everything in between. the fine grinds will be over extracted and bitter. The course grinds will be under extracted and lacking flavor.

Having a consistent course grind will keep some sediment out of your cup if your brewing with a french press.

baja
06-12-2012, 01:53 PM
yep, blade grinders will give you boulders to dust and everything in between. the fine grinds will be over extracted and bitter. The course grinds will be under extracted and lacking flavor.

Having a consistent course grind will keep some sediment out of your cup if your brewing with a french press.

Thanks again.

I went to Amazon to get one but they are out of stock and Amazon is the only reliable shipper I have found for shipping to Baja.

DivineLegion
06-12-2012, 03:12 PM
When using a cold filtering system, you end up with a nice caraffe of super-smooth coffee concentrate. Generally this is stored in the fridge, and you get out the caraffe when you want a cup. If you poured it straight and heated it, it might be the strongest cup of coffee you have ever had (it will surely make even expeienced coffee drinkers extremely "caffeinated" for the rest of the day). The main idea, however, is that you mix it with hot water to your desired strength. The Toddy instructions mention a 1:3 or 1:4 mixture, but I always seem to like a 1:1 mixture. It is extremely smooth, robust, and easy to prepare. One caraffe generally gets used over the course of a week.

Anyway, i'm not sure if just using coffee filters will do the same thing. Generally, I let my grounds steep overnight, then strain the next morning. The filter used in the toddy system is a fibrous filter about one centimeter thick.

About the definition of espresso, that is probably just semantics. My frineds that are most experienced with my cold filtered coffee are the types that spend several dollars a day on "good" espresso and coffee from local shops. Anyway, it's pretty cheap as far as coffee gizmos go, so I thought I would reccommend.

The problem with storing coffee after its extracted is the natural decay of the numerous flavor components. Coffee starts to lose flavor after 45 minutes of brewing, and becomes stale after about 90 min. That means your coffee concentrate is the remnants of a once good coffee.

In regards to the definition of espresso, there are 7 components to good espresso that distinguish it from other forms of coffee, and strict guidelines that make it special. They are; Grind, water quality, coffee quality, 9 bars of pressure, temperature, coffee freshness, baristas hands. Espresso is an art, and can't be replicated without attention to detail. An aero press, or a manual grinder try and eliminate some of these steps, and in turn sacrifice flavor.

DivineLegion
06-12-2012, 03:18 PM
don't underestimate the need for a good grinder, preferably a burr grinder. The whirley blade type are better than most ground, but its hard to get a consistent grind size.
Burr grinders are more expensive but will give you more size flexibility and a more even grind, allowing for a better extracted cup of coffee.

I love my Baratza Encore grinder

I've always wanted a Baratza virtuoso...one day.

baja
06-12-2012, 03:19 PM
The problem with storing coffee after its extracted is the natural decay of the numerous flavor components. Coffee starts to lose flavor after 45 minutes of brewing, and becomes stale after about 90 min. That means your coffee concentrate is the remnants of a once good coffee.

In regards to the definition of espresso, there are 7 components to good espresso that distinguish it from other forms of coffee, and strict guidelines that make it special. They are; Grind, water quality, coffee quality, 9 bars of pressure, temperature, coffee freshness, baristas hands. Espresso is an art, and can't be replicated without attention to detail. An aero press, or a manual grinder try and eliminate some of these steps, and in turn sacrifice flavor.

Some of the very best expresso I have ever had was a few years ago in Northern Italy. Expresso cafes were everywhere and you could tell the proprietor took his work seriously. Like watching a great craftsman at work watching them make an expresso. What great society such a shame they have all the financial problems.

cmhargrove
06-12-2012, 03:34 PM
The problem with storing coffee after its extracted is the natural decay of the numerous flavor components. Coffee starts to lose flavor after 45 minutes of brewing, and becomes stale after about 90 min. That means your coffee concentrate is the remnants of a once good coffee.

In regards to the definition of espresso, there are 7 components to good espresso that distinguish it from other forms of coffee, and strict guidelines that make it special. They are; Grind, water quality, coffee quality, 9 bars of pressure, temperature, coffee freshness, baristas hands. Espresso is an art, and can't be replicated without attention to detail. An aero press, or a manual grinder try and eliminate some of these steps, and in turn sacrifice flavor.

I'm not going to argue with you since it seems you are much more knowledgeable on this subject than I am. However, I think your rules about coffee losing its flavor components probably has more do do with a heated process and some sort of related chemical change. I can only speak from my experience and those that have tried cold filtered coffee. In that way, this discussion is so much like "good" wine and "good" audio speakers. It it extremely subjective, and is often characterized emotionally.

The funny thing is that my friends that like my cold filtered coffee best are ones that speak about coffee exactly like you do. Its the most knowledgeable and experienced "officianados" that seem to love it (then purchase their own filtering kits). So, maybe you could try something new?

maher_tyler
06-12-2012, 04:10 PM
Thanks for the advice! Think i'm gonna go buy a coffee grinder and french press! :sunshine:

Tombstone RJ
06-12-2012, 04:14 PM
Thanks for the advice! Think i'm gonna go buy a coffee grinder and french press! :sunshine:

This is how I do it. Simple, easy, affordable and always a good cup of joe.

Tombstone RJ
06-12-2012, 04:26 PM
You can get different sizes of french presses too, so don't feel like you only have one size choice.

JJG
06-12-2012, 04:35 PM
I've always wanted a Baratza virtuoso...one day.

Baratza sells refurbished grinders straight from their website. One year warranty, updated every thursday.

They just happen to have a virtuoso still available. $150

http://www.baratza.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?search=action&category=RFRB

DivineLegion
06-12-2012, 04:42 PM
You can get different sizes of french presses too, so don't feel like you only have one size choice.

I suggest a 6 or 4 cup press for morning coffee if your on the run.

baja
06-12-2012, 04:46 PM
What do you guys think about this one?

http://www.amazon.com/Baratza-Encore-Conical-Coffee-Grinder/dp/B007F183LK/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1339541029&sr=8-1-fkmr0&tag=acleint-20

DivineLegion
06-12-2012, 04:47 PM
I'm not going to argue with you since it seems you are much more knowledgeable on this subject than I am. However, I think your rules about coffee losing its flavor components probably has more do do with a heated process and some sort of related chemical change. I can only speak from my experience and those that have tried cold filtered coffee. In that way, this discussion is so much like "good" wine and "good" audio speakers. It it extremely subjective, and is often characterized emotionally.

The funny thing is that my friends that like my cold filtered coffee best are ones that speak about coffee exactly like you do. Its the most knowledgeable and experienced "officianados" that seem to love it (then purchase their own filtering kits). So, maybe you could try something new?

No worries brother, I wasn't trying to chastise you. I wish there were new brewing methods to explore, sadly I think I've tried it all at this point, I've entered the expensive world of mico lot hopping. Luckily ive made some good connections with local roasters.

DivineLegion
06-12-2012, 04:47 PM
Baratza sells refurbished grinders straight from their website. One year warranty, updated every thursday.

They just happen to have a virtuoso still available. $150

http://www.baratza.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?search=action&category=RFRB

Awesome!!!

DivineLegion
06-12-2012, 04:49 PM
What do you guys think about this one?

http://www.amazon.com/Baratza-Encore-Conical-Coffee-Grinder/dp/B007F183LK/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1339541029&sr=8-1-fkmr0&tag=acleint-20

Excellent choice Baja. If you are buying to grind coarse this grinder will give you the consistency needed to produce great coffee. Also try weighing your coffee before you grind, make notes on what weights provide the best flavor, and try to replicate your results. If your working with an 8 cup press, start with 2oz of coffee, and adjust your weight as needed. Also try experimenting with flavor profiles. If you are brewing a lighter coffee, zest some lemon or orange onto the grinds. If your brewing darker coffee add a pinch of salt. There are endless avenues of manipulation, and only you know what's perfect for you.

baja
06-12-2012, 04:53 PM
Excellent choice Baja.

I looked up the virtuoso (the one you like) and it's $100 dollars more. is it really worth the extra money?

JJG
06-12-2012, 04:54 PM
What do you guys think about this one?

http://www.amazon.com/Baratza-Encore-Conical-Coffee-Grinder/dp/B007F183LK/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1339541029&sr=8-1-fkmr0&tag=acleint-20

That's exactly what I have. Its great!

baja
06-12-2012, 04:57 PM
Great thread guys. i have learned the cheap grinder I use is likely the reason for my inconsistent brews. I would have never suspected that.

Gotta love the OM.

DivineLegion
06-12-2012, 05:00 PM
I looked up the virtuoso (the one you like) and it's $100 dollars more. is it really worth the extra money?

Yes, but only if you plan on making espresso from home. The virtuoso has 16 sub steps for every level of grind that allow for micro adjustments. When your making espresso you have to be conscious of everything from humidity, to the barometric pressure of the room your pulling shots from. That's where the sub steps are advantageous. For French press you don't need to worry about substeps, you can keep your grinder on one setting, and it will produce the same grind as long as the burrs are sharp.

baja
06-12-2012, 05:03 PM
Yes, but only if you plan on making espresso from home. The virtuoso has 16 sub steps for every level of grind that allow for micro adjustments. When your making espresso you have to be conscious of everything from humidity, to the barometric pressure of the room your pulling shots from. That's where the sub steps are advantageous. For French press you don't need to worry about substeps, you can keep your grinder on one setting, and it will produce the same grind as long as the burrs are sharp.

What kind of expresso machine do you have?

DivineLegion
06-12-2012, 05:07 PM
What kind of expresso machine do you have?

I use a mypressi twist at home with a Porlex mini hand mill.

http://mypressi.com/

Mogulseeker
06-12-2012, 05:56 PM
I don't have a bean grinder man. I'll have to google a place or something here in Tucson. I also need something to brew it in or will my regualr Coffee Mate from Target work out??

Get an antique stone grinder. Best way to go.

DenverBrit
06-12-2012, 06:14 PM
Get an antique stone grinder. Best way to go.

Good advice. The 'Oxen pestle' is the way to go. :)

http://images.ookaboo.com/photo/m/Grinding_Mustard_Seed_for_oil_m.jpg

Mogulseeker
06-12-2012, 06:19 PM
Good advice. The 'Oxen pestle' is the way to go. :)

http://images.ookaboo.com/photo/m/Grinding_Mustard_Seed_for_oil_m.jpg

I was thinking of something a little more handheld.

Like this cast iron one:

http://lub-cdn.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/superphoto/9589914.jpg

baja
06-13-2012, 02:26 AM
Good advice. The 'Oxen pestle' is the way to go. :)

http://images.ookaboo.com/photo/m/Grinding_Mustard_Seed_for_oil_m.jpg

That cow is a Nazi.

DenverBrit
06-13-2012, 08:10 AM
That cow is a Nazi.

It's a Hindu grinder. :)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/HinduSwastika.svg/150px-HinduSwastika.svg.png
Right-facing swastika in the decorative Hindu form, used to evoke "shakti".