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View Full Version : OT - Co Fires: Obama declares CO a major disaster area, over 600 homes destroyed.


Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 01:01 PM
Waldo Fire

* President Obama declares Colorado a federal disaster area, allowing federal funds to assist in firefighting efforts and recovery.

* At least 3 confirmed fatalities, dozens missing.

* Over 600 homes destroyed by the high Park and Waldo Canyon Fires

* 180,000+ acres burned

* Containment and/or control of current fires are not expected until late summer or early fall.


Old Stuff::


*346 homes, primarily in the Manitou Springs subdivision, have been destroyed. An unknown number of other structures including businesses and other infrastructure gone.

* Fire ballooned Tuedsay (6/26) afternoon and evening dur to extreme (65mph) winds. This fire is INSIDE Colorado Springs (NOT JUST near it) and outlying suburbs, south and west of the Air Force Academy, along CO Highway 24 (pikes peak).

* An evacuation has been issued by the City of Colorado Springs for Mt Springs, Peregrine and Westwood. At approximately 4 pm (6/26) the fire progressed west to east in Division Y crossing Queens Canyon and established itself on the east aspect of the Front Range.

(translation: the fire has crossed the last significant physical barrier between it and the greater CO. Springs area)

* An unknown (but assumed to be at least several hundred) number of homes, businesses and other structures have been destroyed.

* ~7,000 acres. 5% contained? 32,000 residents in W and NW Colorado Springs have been evacuated

* Suspected cause of this fire is arson.


6/26 map: http://kdvr.com/2012/06/26/map-waldo-canyon-fire/

From inside Co Springs:

http://localtvkdvr.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/awxqqj0cmaapii_-large.jpg?w=340

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site36/2012/0626/20120626_084116_colorado_wildfire_waldo_canyon_ins ide.jpg

http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/chieftain.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/b7/eb717bfe-c007-11e1-ba31-001a4bcf887a/4fea7d7481842.image.jpg

Currently Evacuation area (this is western Co Springs just south of the Air Force Academy)

http://localtvkdvr.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/waldo_fire_6_26_12_mandatory_rev2_11x17.pdf


High Park Fire

* Fire has increased to almost 90,000 acres. Progress is stalled at 45% containment.

* 57 more homes destroyed in Glacier Park neighborhood, for a total of at least 250 homes destroyed and several hundred other structures.

* Cost of firefighting efforts to date exceed $30 million

* Fire still has a high growth potential. Has jumped the Poudre River several times already and is burning into extremely rugged terrain.


Current Fire Maps as of June 23:

( note: Poudre Canyon is highway 14 labeled on the map)

http://www.freeimagehosting.net/newuploads/932m2.jpg

Links to other information:

http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2904/

http://www.coloradoan.com/apps/pbcs.dll/misc?url=/custom/highfire/highfire.pbs

Other CO Wildfires:

http://www.inciweb.org/state/6/

alkemical
06-11-2012, 01:02 PM
Best wishes to all the CO folk. I'm from the plains of CO myself.

SouthStndJunkie
06-11-2012, 01:06 PM
That sucks, I used to live in Loveland and Fort Collins and am familiar with that area.

bronco militia
06-11-2012, 01:09 PM
is that Horse Tooth resevoir?

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 01:10 PM
is that Horse Tooth resevoir?

Yes. Horsetooth Mountain and Arthur's Rock Mountain are in flames.

Dexter
06-11-2012, 01:11 PM
My family owns some property up around Red Feather Lakes. From what I understand its not quite in that area. Scary though.

My thoughts definitely go out to the people that live in that area, and the brave firefighter and other personnel involved in fighting this fire.

The beetle kill can't be helping, there is so much in that area, which is sad in itself.

oubronco
06-11-2012, 01:11 PM
Nice lookin lake

broncocalijohn
06-11-2012, 01:15 PM
Has this come close to Nunn? I have family in Fort Collins and Nunn. Nunn isn't like the pictures I see on TV with the forest like settings but any raging fire can sweep through grass and **** load of junk on those 35 acre property laid out.

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 01:15 PM
My family owns some property up around Red Feather Lakes. From what I understand its not quite in that area. Scary though.

My thoughts definitely go out to the people that live in that area, and the brave firefighter and other personnel involved in fighting this fire.

The beetle kill can't be helping, there is so much in that area, which is sad in itself.


Yeah, the beetle kill basically reduced a lot of that area to a tinderbox, which is one of the reasons the fire has spread so quickly. The scary thing is, the beetle kill there is much less than in other parts of Colorado.

bronco militia
06-11-2012, 01:15 PM
Yes. Horsetooth Mountain and Grey Rock Mountain are in flames.

damn it.....


here's a map:

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_20831968/perimeter-map-colorado-wildfire-high-park-fire-near-fort-collins

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 01:16 PM
Has this come close to Nunn? I have family in Fort Collins and Nunn. Nunn isn't like the pictures I see on TV with the forest like settings but any raging fire can sweep through grass and **** load of junk on those 35 acre property laid out.


Nunn is several miles east of Fort Collins. It should be safe.

Stagger Lee
06-11-2012, 01:19 PM
Stay safe out there friends.

Mountain Bronco
06-11-2012, 01:27 PM
Colorado and the west in general is so dry this year. Lets hope the monsoon rain season starts up soon.

Natedogg
06-11-2012, 01:30 PM
From Fort Collins. Family still lives there. Seeing all that nature in flames is really a kick in the gut.

crush17
06-11-2012, 01:34 PM
Spent 30 years of my life there. My moms house is near the foothills. I am absolutely devastated and very worried.

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 01:47 PM
Faith in Humanity somewhat restored.

Red Cross, Salvation Army and other relief organizations being overwhelmed with donations.

http://www.coloradoan.com/viewart/20120611/NEWS01/306110005/How-help-High-Park-Fire

Tombstone RJ
06-11-2012, 01:59 PM
I spent a lot of time in Ft. Fun. Too bad about this fire, are they saying lighting started it?

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 02:08 PM
I spent a lot of time in Ft. Fun. Too bad about this fire, are they saying lighting started it?

The current theory is natural ignition, as no human source has been identified, but the forensics team has just barely been able to start work.

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 02:11 PM
'Firefighters are defending homes near Lory State Park today as the High Park Fire moves east toward Fort Collins."


...



Gavin, who is up at the state park, said firefighters have been creating defensible space around homes in the area of the north end of Horsetooth Reservoir, and in some cases covering structures with fire-resistant foam. He said the fire has been burning through those areas but sparing homes due to the work by firefighters and aircraft.
“There are flames coming up to homes, but we have fire equipment up here and we’ve been working all day to make them defensible,” Gavin said."'

"Based on current weather and forecasts, Gavin said there’s currently little chance of the fire moving into the city of Fort Collins. But he said the fire has been throwing debris as much as a half-mile in advance of the actual flames, and said there’s always the potential one of the city’s open spaces or natural areas could ignite."

Hats off to the fine work being done. There are a *lot* of homes in that area.

http://cmsimg.coloradoan.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Avis=G2&Dato=20120611&Kategori=NEWS01&Lopenr=306110009&Ref=AR&MaxW=620&Border=0&High-Park-Fire-descends-into-Lory-State-Park

cutthemdown
06-11-2012, 02:13 PM
Faith in Humanity somewhat restored.

Red Cross, Salvation Army and other relief organizations being overwhelmed with donations.

http://www.coloradoan.com/viewart/20120611/NEWS01/306110005/How-help-High-Park-Fire

Really America always steps up when we have an emergency. We ain't perfect but I think we generally do care about each other and try and donate to regions when they are on the ropes. I always do because I know one day the **** hits the fan in California and we will need help.

scorpio
06-11-2012, 02:21 PM
It's pretty crazy up here right now. You can see the flames from the CSU campus. The fire has been sweeping down the foothills toward town all morning.

I know a few people personally who have lost their houses, and I suspect I'll know quite a few more before things calm down.

Drunken.Broncoholic
06-11-2012, 02:21 PM
Dam must be dry back there. Out here in Cali we are a half puffed cigarette away from the entire state blazing away. Dry dry dry

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 02:25 PM
Dam must be dry back there. Out here in Cali we are a half puffed cigarette away from the entire state blazing away. Dry dry dry

Colorado is in extreme drought conditions (even relative to our normal drought).

hades
06-11-2012, 02:27 PM
Those flames are getting very close to the house I grew up in. Luckily, my parents moved further east, still in Ft Collins, but not as close to the flames. My Mom said it was like it was snowing black, ash is covering up everything.

Man, I'm tempted to call my folks right now and buy them a plane ticket to come visit. they are old and don't need to be breathing in that crap.

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 02:28 PM
Those flames are getting very close to the house I grew up in. Luckily, my parents moved further east, still in Ft Collins, but not as close to the flames. My Mom said it was like it was snowing black, ash is covering up everything.

Man, I'm tempted to call my folks right now and buy them a plane ticket to come visit. they are old and don't need to be breathing in that crap.

Last night the smoke settled over Fort Collins. You needed a gas mask to be outside and not be choking on ash.

scorpio
06-11-2012, 02:33 PM
my girlfriend snapped this from Old Town this morning. It's way worse now.

http://i.imgur.com/nIcc3.jpg

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 02:35 PM
The fire is threatening already damaged water supplies:

http://www.coloradoan.com/article/20120611/NEWS01/306110013/City-Serious-concerns-about-High-Park-Fire-s-effects-water-quality?odyssey=mod|defcon|img|FRONTPAGE

If water from both the Poudre River and Horsetooth becomes unusable (the Poudre was already contaminated from the Hewlett Fire), a lot of farmers are going to be in big trouble.

"Horsetooth Reservoir and the Poudre River are the city’s two sources of drinking water, and both sit directly below slopes being burned by the High Park Fire."

"The city’s Poudre River water intake is at Gateway Natural Area along Colo. Highway 14 in Poudre Canyon remains inaccessible, Voytko said.

The city stopped taking water from the Poudre River last week after rainwater running off of the Hewlett Fire burn area temporarily turned the river black, Voytko said.

The city has been taking its water entirely from Horsetooth Reservoir since then and will continue to do so after cancelling plans to begin taking Poudre River water on Monday. The High Park Fire burned the electric lines in Poudre Canyon providing primary power to the city’s Poudre River water intake, but the city still has the ability to withdraw Poudre water if necessary, Voytko said."

scorpio
06-11-2012, 02:45 PM
From the CSU practice field (not my picture):

http://i.imgur.com/KSiRE.jpg

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 02:50 PM
Rolling updates in the OP

rocket88
06-11-2012, 03:04 PM
A few photos from my back yard last night (the fire has doubled in size since then)

http://i.imgur.com/nMLNJ.jpg

The sun showing through the smoke

http://i.imgur.com/ozpmy.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/asYxq.jpg

Cmac821
06-11-2012, 03:10 PM
It is ridiculous how thick the smoke got last night. Keeping a close eye, hopefully it doesn't come into Fort Collins. If it is 0% contained again tonight I might start packing to bail

Edit: Rocket88 photos do a pretty good job showing the smoke

scorpio
06-11-2012, 03:12 PM
It is ridiculous how thick the smoke got last night. Keeping a close eye, hopefully it doesn't come into Fort Collins. If it is 0% contained again tonight I might start packing to bail

I don't think there's any way they'll let it cross Overland. But yeah if I still lived on that side of town I would be pretty nervous.

Meck77
06-11-2012, 03:13 PM
It is ridiculous how thick the smoke got last night. Keeping a close eye, hopefully it doesn't come into Fort Collins. If it is 0% contained again tonight I might start packing to bail

You might consider it just for health reasons. When the Hayman fire set in the smoke was so thick across the front range you could barely see a few hundred feet away.

The untold story is the amount of livestock that will die. I had a rescue horse who died from smoke inhalation that was 100 miles from the fire. Alpacas are the most at risk. Hundreds of them died from that fire alone.

Cmac821
06-11-2012, 03:19 PM
I was at the Taste Of Fort Collins festival yesterday, wasn't to smoky but the sky looked awful. Afterwards driving back the smoke was really heavy and noticeable with that ominous red sun. Everything smells like a campfire too

scorpio
06-11-2012, 03:20 PM
Maybe we'll get a new football stadium out of the deal.

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 03:20 PM
I don't think there's any way they'll let it cross Overland. But yeah if I still lived on that side of town I would be pretty nervous.

It's unlikely to spread into the city proper, but fires can jump long distances. If the wind stays calm that will help. The biggest threat is to the foothills "suburbs" in Horsetooth Park and LSP.

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 03:20 PM
Maybe we'll get a new football stadium out of the deal.

Don't you know they are planning an idiotic on-campus stadium?

http://cmsimg.coloradoan.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=G2&Date=20120511&Category=NEWS01&ArtNo=305110009&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&Architect-details-plans-42-000-seat-CSU-stadium

scorpio
06-11-2012, 03:23 PM
Don't you know they are planning an idiotic on-campus stadium?

http://cmsimg.coloradoan.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=G2&Date=20120511&Category=NEWS01&ArtNo=305110009&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&Architect-details-plans-42-000-seat-CSU-stadium

Yeah that's what I was referring to.

Tombstone RJ
06-11-2012, 03:25 PM
Don't you know they are planning an idiotic on-campus stadium?

http://cmsimg.coloradoan.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=G2&Date=20120511&Category=NEWS01&ArtNo=305110009&Ref=AR&MaxW=640&Border=0&Architect-details-plans-42-000-seat-CSU-stadium

I heard about the on campus stadium, that sounds great to me.

Meck77
06-11-2012, 03:26 PM
Not familiar with the stadium plans. So where are they suppose to put it. Off campus?

scorpio
06-11-2012, 03:28 PM
Not familiar with the stadium plans. So where are they suppose to put it. Off campus?

Hughes Stadium is currently a couple miles away from campus in the foothills.

The new AD, who they hired because he wrote a big check, thinks we need a stadium on campus and there have been all sorts of ridiculous proposals about how to shoehorn it in. There's currently something of a local civil war brewing about it.

rocket88
06-11-2012, 03:29 PM
One more photo from last night showing people lined up to go to the Drive In with the fire raging in the background....

http://i.imgur.com/5zRd5.jpg

Cmac821
06-11-2012, 03:31 PM
Hughes Stadium is currently a couple miles away from campus in the foothills.

The new AD, who they hired because he wrote a big check, thinks we need a stadium on campus and there have been all sorts of ridiculous proposals about how to shoehorn it in. There's currently something of a local civil war brewing about it.

There is a pretty big division of the two parties. I would dread more on campus construction, it already sucks

Tombstone RJ
06-11-2012, 03:31 PM
Hughes Stadium is currently a couple miles away from campus in the foothills.

The new AD, who they hired because he wrote a big check, thinks we need a stadium on campus and there have been all sorts of ridiculous proposals about how to shoehorn it in. There's currently something of a local civil war brewing about it.

Those plans look like the SW corner of campus?

Cmac821
06-11-2012, 03:36 PM
Those plans look like the SW corner of campus?

That picture shows it would take out a huge parking lot and two resident halls to build it. There is not a lot of parking on campus as is so that would be interesting and every year the freshman class grows so taking away housing seems like a bad idea

Tombstone RJ
06-11-2012, 03:40 PM
That picture shows it would take out a huge parking lot and two resident halls to build it. There is not a lot of parking on campus as is so that would be interesting and every year the freshman class grows so taking away housing seems like a bad idea

let me say I'm a CSU grad I don't care about on campus housing, etc. I'd rather CSU become the dominant D1 football program in the state and have a bitch'n on campus stadium.

As for the rest of the undergrads, meh, go somewhere else.

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 03:45 PM
Not familiar with the stadium plans. So where are they suppose to put it. Off campus?

CSU owns a ton of land in and around Fort Collins (thousands of acres in addition to the main campus). The current stadium is currently off campus.

Cmac821
06-11-2012, 03:45 PM
let me say I'm a CSU grad I don't care about on campus housing, etc. I'd rather CSU become the dominant D1 football program in the state and have a b****'n on campus stadium.

As for the rest of the undergrads, meh, go somewhere else.

Fair enough, I think it would be cool to see as a current student but being an out state student I sure as hell don't want to pay for it.

And the football team is in shambles after the incident that ended with Orakpo and Capi being kicked out, easily the best guys on the team. I say raise the money while you wait on McElwain to turn the team around then reward them

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 03:46 PM
Those plans look like the SW corner of campus?

Pretty much dead center E-W on the southern side.

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 03:48 PM
let me say I'm a CSU grad I don't care about on campus housing, etc. I'd rather CSU become the dominant D1 football program in the state and have a b****'n on campus stadium.

As for the rest of the undergrads, meh, go somewhere else.

I'd rather CSU remain a top state Engineering and Agricultural/Veterinary school rather than wasting time and space with football stadiums in the middle of campus.

pricejj
06-11-2012, 03:50 PM
How much of Poudre Canyon is burned? From the maps, it looks like just the lower mile or so?

scorpio
06-11-2012, 03:50 PM
Fair enough, I think it would be cool to see as a current student but being an out state student I sure as hell don't want to pay for it.

And the football team is in shambles after the incident that ended with Orakpo and Capi being kicked out, easily the best guys on the team. I say raise the money while you wait on McElwain to turn the team around then reward them

The story is that it will all be privately funded. I'm skeptical.

Cmac821
06-11-2012, 03:55 PM
Anyways, back to the fire. There seems to be a lapse in information getting out because everything I see is from 2-4 hours ago

Tombstone RJ
06-11-2012, 03:55 PM
I'd rather CSU remain a top state Engineering and Agricultural/Veterinary school rather than wasting time and space with football stadiums in the middle of campus.

why not do both? Fact is if CSU wants to be a well respected school it will take great academics and that extra incentive for students to throw down money and come to CSU: a football stadium on compass with a great athletic department.

JHMO of course, but things like this certainly help attract kids to the school.

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 03:57 PM
Anyways, back to the fire. There seems to be a lapse in information getting out because everything I see is from 2-4 hours ago

The best source seems to be the Coloradoan (Fort Collins local paper) but it hasn't updated in a while. The Denver Post looks way behind in coverage.

scorpio
06-11-2012, 04:02 PM
I just watched the press conference a few minutes ago. They confirmed lightning as the cause, still think about 100 houses are gone, and hope to have a % containment estimate by tonight.

Cmac821
06-11-2012, 04:07 PM
I just watched the press conference a few minutes ago. They confirmed lightning as the cause, still think about 100 houses are gone, and hope to have a % containment estimate by tonight.

Thanks for that update

broncocalijohn
06-11-2012, 04:09 PM
Really America always steps up when we have an emergency. We ain't perfect but I think we generally do care about each other and try and donate to regions when they are on the ropes. I always do because I know one day the **** hits the fan in California and we will need help.

So I guess Sylmar, Northridge and Oakland/SF (89) earthquakes dont count? How about Malibu floods? SoCal and San Diego fires of just the past few years dont count? Riots in South Central? How about Oakland Hills fire from 20 years ago? Yet those fail in comparison when Trader Joes ended the Christmas time "oreo" cookies last season. Now, that is when relief was needed!

Fedaykin
06-11-2012, 09:00 PM
Looks like there is now a fatality:

http://www.coloradoan.com/article/20120611/NEWS01/306110020/Officials-identify-suspected-High-Park-Fire-fatality?odyssey=mod|breaking|text|FRONTPAGE

GoHAM
06-11-2012, 09:02 PM
http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2904/#
-Updated 5 mins ago.

Smoke was/is blowing through Laramie this evening. Hope all those of you in Ft. Collins are safe.

Cmac821
06-11-2012, 09:38 PM
http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2904/#
-Updated 5 mins ago.

Smoke was/is blowing through Laramie this evening. Hope all those of you in Ft. Collins are safe.

I'm still here :strong:

Broncobiv
06-11-2012, 09:55 PM
Is the New Belgium Brewery safe?? :( Maybe they can use some Bud to help put out the fire...that's about all it's good for!

cutthemdown
06-11-2012, 10:02 PM
So I guess Sylmar, Northridge and Oakland/SF (89) earthquakes dont count? How about Malibu floods? SoCal and San Diego fires of just the past few years dont count? Riots in South Central? How about Oakland Hills fire from 20 years ago? Yet those fail in comparison when Trader Joes ended the Christmas time "oreo" cookies last season. Now, that is when relief was needed!

No doubt we have had our share of disasters.

Chris
06-11-2012, 10:42 PM
Stay safe friends.

Flex Gunmetal
06-12-2012, 10:38 AM
Is the New Belgium Brewery safe?? :( Maybe they can use some Bud to help put out the fire...that's about all it's good for!

I live a few blocks away from NB, it's fine. The fire is a ways west, but is at 43000 acres. Experts believe it'll reach 100000. Ash and smoke here in town. It's unlikely it'll actually hit town

Irish Stout
06-12-2012, 11:11 AM
I live a few blocks away from NB, it's fine. The fire is a ways west, but is at 43000 acres. Experts believe it'll reach 100000. Ash and smoke here in town. It's unlikely it'll actually hit town

They've now started battling the blaze back. 5% containment. Not much, but its a start. I'd expect it to get to 60,000 acres before its contained, assuming the wind doesn't go into overdrive today.

It was hazy and smelled like camp fire here in Denver this morning. I can only imagine how bad it is in the Fort.

Paladin
06-12-2012, 11:11 AM
I am in Northwest Fort Collins. That thing gets closer to LaPorte, my wife and I will be leaving. I do not worry so much for the fire at this time, but we have not been outside the past two days because of the smoke. We are leaving for lunch shortly to celebrate our 50th anniversary. We go up the Poudre Canyon a lot, and it will be sad to see the damage. Very dry, and I worry about the water and the longer term costs of the fire aftermath. The homes in the developments west of the Reservoir and up the canyon are/were very nice places. Sad days......







(This message was typed without the aid of Mrs. TOG's nipples.)

broncocalijohn
06-12-2012, 11:40 AM
Paladin, 50 years? Damn, you must be older than Baja. Congrats and hope ash doesnt get in your soup (or whatever old people eat/drink). Take her to the brewery and have some Sunflower (or was it dandalion) beer. Be safe!

Cmac821
06-12-2012, 11:46 AM
The smoke wasn't to bad yesterday. A little haze out there now, will have to see how strong the wind will be today

edit: looks like calm winds and a high of 84, what a waste of a good day

Uncle Bill
06-12-2012, 01:17 PM
I'd rather CSU remain a top state Engineering and Agricultural/Veterinary school rather than wasting time and space with football stadiums in the middle of campus.


I admittedly just read about the talk of a new stadium last week, and don't know the details, but am intrigued by the idea. Is it really a legitimate possiblility? I think the potential of an on-campus stadium for improving the entire college experience at CSU is through the roof. I went to school there from 1994-2000, when we actually had a good team, and even then most students weren't too enthused about going to games. I mean, it's just too much of a hassle to get to the stadium. But if it were right there, and you could stumble over after having a few beers in your dorm room, I think attendance and school spirit would drastically improve. Other than cost, what are the issues that people are hung-up on? Just curious...

After living in the midwest for the last 10 years and seeing how passionate most people are about their college sports (even lesser-known schools like Dayton, Ball State, etc.), I can definitely say that the worst part about CSU was that sports were a bit of an afterthought. People from other schools share a life-long bond with fellow alumni b/c of the allegiance to their team, but CSU has nothing. Maybe it's just the way it will always be, since there is so much other stuff to do in CO, and since CSU plays in a crappy conference. But it seems like an on-campus stadium (and a half-decent team) could go a long way to changing things...

Anyway, Ft. Collins is a cool place, and I hope it doesn't burn down. Seriously, best wishes to anyone out there who is at risk of losing life/property to the flames...

Irish Stout
06-12-2012, 02:00 PM
So much for that 5% containment offering a lot of hope on a quick stop to this mess.

High Park Fire incident commander says fire likely won't be under control until the fall. #highparkfire
by jpmeyerDPost via twitter 1:36 PM

Fedaykin
06-12-2012, 03:49 PM
Luckily the eastern and northern side of the fire has been halted by geographic features and lack of fuel, but the western side is moving into extremely rugged terrain full of beetle kill and will be very difficult to fight.

Requiem
06-12-2012, 03:53 PM
Stay safe everyone!

Meck77
06-12-2012, 03:54 PM
So much for that 5% containment offering a lot of hope on a quick stop to this mess.

High Park Fire incident commander says fire likely won't be under control until the fall. #highparkfire
by jpmeyerDPost via twitter 1:36 PM

Fall? As in Sept? What?

Cmac821
06-12-2012, 04:17 PM
Fall? As in Sept? What?

Yeah I don't like the sound of that either, that's is some bs

pricejj
06-12-2012, 04:25 PM
Luckily the eastern and northern side of the fire has been halted by geographic features and lack of fuel, but the western side is moving into extremely rugged terrain full of beetle kill and will be very difficult to fight.

But the wind blows to the East, so it shouldn't be that bad....I hope.

Paladin
06-12-2012, 04:28 PM
Not if you've seen the beetle kill up there. I predict that there will be a major fire in Chambers Lake/Laramie River/Lost Lake area somewhat soon. There is just too much beetle kill and it is heavily visited. Fishing should be shot to h3ll up there. There are a couple of large ranches up there as well as camp grounds and such. Hohnholtz lakes are up there where there is great fishing for Browns. Larimie has big Rainbows and some Browns. The Poudre is not as productive as in the past, because of all the diversions and heavy use, but rainbows lurk in there in the Fly fishing zones. May have to go over the pass to the North Platte to get fishing in this year. Best to float it.





(This message was typed without the aid of Mrs. TOG's nipples.)

Cmac821
06-12-2012, 05:23 PM
Man it is sooo smokey outside now, if this in fact goes to the fall this summer is going to suck

Meck77
06-12-2012, 05:40 PM
Not if you've seen the beetle kill up there. I predict that there will be a major fire in Chambers Lake/Laramie River/Lost Lake area somewhat soon. There is just too much beetle kill and it is heavily visited. Fishing should be shot to h3ll up there. There are a couple of large ranches up there as well as camp grounds and such. Hohnholtz lakes are up there where there is great fishing for Browns. Larimie has big Rainbows and some Browns. The Poudre is not as productive as in the past, because of all the diversions and heavy use, but rainbows lurk in there in the Fly fishing zones. May have to go over the pass to the North Platte to get fishing in this year. Best to float it.





(This message was typed without the aid of Mrs. TOG's nipples.)

I could name a dozen plus areas where drunken idiots party all the time and leave smoldering fires in NW colorado. I've come across them before and put them out myself. The tiny trees of the front range are nothing compared to those in the Routt National forest. Many of those stands of trees are two, three and even up to 5 feet thick that stretch 50+ miles! I've been close to them when they crash and let me tell you it's flat out scary.

When NW Colorado goes up it could very well be a national emergency. People will wonder why the Obama administration did not hire people to clean it up with all the trillions of bailout dollars that were pissed away. That is my prediction.

Fedaykin
06-12-2012, 08:41 PM
Poor visibility has kept air tankers out of action most of the day so efforts have been focused on the ground. The hoped for 10% containment is unlikely.

Ironically, higher winds and hotter temperatures would have been more helpful to clear the smoke to allow air traffic to safely operate.

dsmoot
06-13-2012, 03:47 AM
I could name a dozen plus areas where drunken idiots party all the time and leave smoldering fires in NW colorado. I've come across them before and put them out myself. The tiny trees of the front range are nothing compared to those in the Routt National forest. Many of those stands of trees are two, three and even up to 5 feet thick that stretch 50+ miles! I've been close to them when they crash and let me tell you it's flat out scary.

When NW Colorado goes up it could very well be a national emergency. People will wonder why the Obama administration did not hire people to clean it up with all the trillions of bailout dollars that were pissed away. That is my prediction.

I visited Yellowstone for the first time in 1991. Just devastating visually and so widespread. My last visit was 2 weeks ago. Like another place today with the ability to support wildlife to a greater degree than before. The fishing within the park is actually better than ever and improved following the fire. I believe this is a needed cycle of nature and might be the only way to rid the forest of the beetles. Other than the loss of personal property, it will be just fine in the long term and is a necessary situation to rejuvenate the forests. Those who choose to build in those locations take the risk at their own peril. I am sorry for them but it is what it is. A generation of time is really short in the big picture.

I traveled through Poudre Canyon on my way back to Wyoming late this past winter. There was very little snowpack and looked very dry then. Not surprised at all by this fire. I have lived in NW Colorado and know of the terrain spoken of very well. It is not a matter of when the fires will occur there, just when and it will come back just fine too.

hambone13
06-13-2012, 06:05 AM
damn it.....


here's a map:

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_20831968/perimeter-map-colorado-wildfire-high-park-fire-near-fort-collins

It sucks that this is going on but most people with property don't maintain it. This **** almost never happens when you have proper maintenance conducted on the trees around your house. Otherwise, it's just a natural occurrence....there will be fire.

Fedaykin
06-14-2012, 07:27 PM
bump

Fedaykin
06-14-2012, 07:29 PM
There's currently no news, but there is a large amount of smoke significantly south of where the current perimeter maps show. South of Horsetooth Reservoir on the southern end of Fort Collins. Hopefully this is just from backburning.

Dexter
06-14-2012, 07:46 PM
My family has owned property just east of Red Feather Lakes for 40 years, this is getting really scary.

mhgaffney
06-14-2012, 09:33 PM
I lived in Rist Canyon in my college years -- in the late 60s and early 70s. From the map it looks to be the epicenter.

In Sept 2010 I returned to the Fort for a reunion of old friends. I also revisited my old stomping grounds in N Park.

I was both astonished and depressed by the massive Lodgepole Pine die off. It was obvious then that the bug kill -- dead forests over thousands of square miles -- would be followed by fire within a few years.

A second cycle of destruction. Only when the fires have burned through the dead forests will things begin to recover. In time. Hopefully.

MHG

Vegas_Bronco
06-14-2012, 10:16 PM
Stadiums began on campus...known as fieldhouse. Oncampus stadiums are the best and generate a better return. CSU is the only school with worse attendance than UNLV. You guys need an oncampus fieldhouse.

Que
06-15-2012, 11:03 AM
I visited Yellowstone for the first time in 1991. Just devastating visually and so widespread. My last visit was 2 weeks ago. Like another place today with the ability to support wildlife to a greater degree than before. The fishing within the park is actually better than ever and improved following the fire. I believe this is a needed cycle of nature and might be the only way to rid the forest of the beetles. Other than the loss of personal property, it will be just fine in the long term and is a necessary situation to rejuvenate the forests. Those who choose to build in those locations take the risk at their own peril. I am sorry for them but it is what it is. A generation of time is really short in the big picture.

I traveled through Poudre Canyon on my way back to Wyoming late this past winter. There was very little snowpack and looked very dry then. Not surprised at all by this fire. I have lived in NW Colorado and know of the terrain spoken of very well. It is not a matter of when the fires will occur there, just when and it will come back just fine too.

There is a lot of wisdom in what you say. Fire is an important part of the forests ecosystem. In fact, the are a lot of trees that actually depend on fire to reproduce. The problem is it isn't this type of fire. Healthy fire is a relatively slow burning low temp ground fire. These fires are the opposite - fast burning crowning fires with high temps. The real issue with such high temp fires is that they melt the silica in the soil and turn the resulting top layer into something like glass. Water won't penetrate it and vegetation takes an extremely long time to break through it - generations long.

Part of the cause of this is that we've been putting fires out for the last 100 or so years. Part is that we clear cut forests over the last 150 years and what has been replaced are high density uniform forests - tons of fuel and actually unhealthy (trees unable to fend off pests like the beetles). Add to this rising temperatures and drought brought on by climate change and you have things like the beetle explosion. We don't have über cold winters here anymore to keep the beetles in check. So, now more fuel to burn.

We are in a pickle of our own making I am afraid.

Cito Pelon
06-15-2012, 04:19 PM
There is a lot of wisdom in what you say. Fire is an important part of the forests ecosystem. In fact, the are a lot of trees that actually depend on fire to reproduce. The problem is it isn't this type of fire. Healthy fire is a relatively slow burning low temp ground fire. These fires are the opposite - fast burning crowning fires with high temps. The real issue with such high temp fires is that they melt the silica in the soil and turn the resulting top layer into something like glass. Water won't penetrate it and vegetation takes an extremely long time to break through it - generations long.

Part of the cause of this is that we've been putting fires out for the last 100 or so years. Part is that we clear cut forests over the last 150 years and what has been replaced are high density uniform forests - tons of fuel and actually unhealthy (trees unable to fend off pests like the beetles). Add to this rising temperatures and drought brought on by climate change and you have things like the beetle explosion. We don't have über cold winters here anymore to keep the beetles in check. So, now more fuel to burn.

We are in a pickle of our own making I am afraid.

It's a nasty situation. What should happen after a burn is plant aspens, not the pines again. Aspens are a natural firebreak, they don't torch like pines. And aspens reproduce by suckering, they don't seed.

Cito Pelon
06-15-2012, 04:35 PM
Bad news it jumped the Poudre. That jump is up to 200 acres now and the SW winds won't help.

Fedaykin
06-15-2012, 04:49 PM
It's a nasty situation. What should happen after a burn is plant aspens, not the pines again. Aspens are a natural firebreak, they don't torch like pines. And aspens reproduce by suckering, they don't seed.

Most of the region affected is way to dry for deciduous trees.

Cito Pelon
06-15-2012, 05:34 PM
Most of the region affected is way to dry for deciduous trees.

Yeah, that may be true. Nevertheless, aspens are fine from say 8000 ft, and the conifers will replace them eventually. It's an option since as you say the soil may get too hard for conifers to seed naturally.

Tombstone RJ
06-15-2012, 06:11 PM
I visited Yellowstone for the first time in 1991. Just devastating visually and so widespread. My last visit was 2 weeks ago. Like another place today with the ability to support wildlife to a greater degree than before. The fishing within the park is actually better than ever and improved following the fire. I believe this is a needed cycle of nature and might be the only way to rid the forest of the beetles. Other than the loss of personal property, it will be just fine in the long term and is a necessary situation to rejuvenate the forests. Those who choose to build in those locations take the risk at their own peril. I am sorry for them but it is what it is. A generation of time is really short in the big picture.

I traveled through Poudre Canyon on my way back to Wyoming late this past winter. There was very little snowpack and looked very dry then. Not surprised at all by this fire. I have lived in NW Colorado and know of the terrain spoken of very well. It is not a matter of when the fires will occur there, just when and it will come back just fine too.

In other words, a deciduous forest renews itself by burning every few hundred years. It's a totally natural cycle and when people build homes in a deciduous forest, well, be prepared to burn baby.

I have no sympathy for people who have property in a deciduous forest. None. That includes mountain ski town people. Sorry people, the forest will burn and the longer you prevent the burn, the worse it will be when it does burn because there is soooo much fuel for the fire (dead trees).

Cito Pelon
06-15-2012, 07:04 PM
In other words, a deciduous forest renews itself by burning every few hundred years. It's a totally natural cycle and when people build homes in a deciduous forest, well, be prepared to burn baby.

I have no sympathy for people who have property in a deciduous forest. None. That includes mountain ski town people. Sorry people, the forest will burn and the longer you prevent the burn, the worse it will be when it does burn because there is soooo much fuel for the fire (dead trees).

I saw a good news segment where they had a firefighter on explaining the nuts and bolts. Dude explained exactly what they do, he called it "triage" - if there is a good road up to the house, they back a fireengine with a water tank up to the house, then they start throwing furniture off the deck, throwing woodpiles away from the house, do a controlled burn around the house.

The reason he called it "triage" is because they know real quick if a house is beyond saving, they have to make a quick decision on how best to utilize their resources. They don't bother with a house that has no defensible space, and also that has poor access for a fire engine. They concentrate their resources on what they CAN do, don't bother with what they know they can't do.

Cito Pelon
06-18-2012, 11:48 AM
Jeez, this fire is up to 60k acres now and only 45% containment, close to 2000 firefighters now. Pagosa Springs has a 12k acre fire going, now another fire down by 11 Mile. New Mexico and Arizona had the big fires earlier. Yeesh, a lot of cleanout of forest going.

Denver Water has spent about a year cleaning out the silt from the Hayman fire from that big Strontia Springs reservoir. They said they dug enough silt from it to fill Mile High. Horsetooth is next for that kind of operation. Eh, maybe there's a bright side to all this.

Que
06-18-2012, 11:50 AM
In other words, a deciduous forest renews itself by burning every few hundred years. It's a totally natural cycle and when people build homes in a deciduous forest, well, be prepared to burn baby.

I have no sympathy for people who have property in a deciduous forest. None. That includes mountain ski town people. Sorry people, the forest will burn and the longer you prevent the burn, the worse it will be when it does burn because there is soooo much fuel for the fire (dead trees).

Not to be too much of a propeller head here but these aren't deciduous forests. A deciduous tree sheds its leaves in the fall (elm, oak, maple, aspen). These are coniferous forests (pine, spruce). Fire does play an important role in their natural cycle though.

As someone who has lived in coniferous forests (Conifer and now Crested Butte), it might surprise you that I agree with you in principle (let them burn). But and there is a big but, we have to let them burn right. Low temperature, rolling ground fire. What you see now with these drought conditions and beetle kill fueled fires is not healthy for the forest and not desirable - high temperature crowning fires. Rather than renewing the forest, the soil is killed and sealed under a fine layer of melted silica (essentially glass). The nutrients of the burned trees (and later rotting trees) can't soak back into the soil and seedlings (of all types) are starved for water and can't poke back up through the soil. Basically turns the soil into a moonscape. Run off becomes a huge issue which jeopardizes downstream water users (e.g. Denver) and fish populations.

In fact, the forest service has to basically perforate the soil to get the re-vegetation process started. I even believe that they toyed around with actually encouraging off trail ATV and motor use in some of the front range burn areas as a way to do so.

So, while "let 'em burn" might sound good, as with all things in life, it isn't that simple. Let 'em burn correctly is probably a better phrase.

Cito Pelon
06-18-2012, 12:37 PM
Not to be too much of a propeller head here but these aren't deciduous forests. A deciduous tree sheds its leaves in the fall (elm, oak, maple, aspen). These are coniferous forests (pine, spruce). Fire does play an important role in their natural cycle though.

As someone who has lived in coniferous forests (Conifer and now Crested Butte), it might surprise you that I agree with you in principle (let them burn). But and there is a big but, we have to let them burn right. Low temperature, rolling ground fire. What you see now with these drought conditions and beetle kill fueled fires is not healthy for the forest and not desirable - high temperature crowning fires. Rather than renewing the forest, the soil is killed and sealed under a fine layer of melted silica (essentially glass). The nutrients of the burned trees (and later rotting trees) can't soak back into the soil and seedlings (of all types) are starved for water and can't poke back up through the soil. Basically turns the soil into a moonscape. Run off becomes a huge issue which jeopardizes downstream water users (e.g. Denver) and fish populations.

In fact, the forest service has to basically perforate the soil to get the re-vegetation process started. I even believe that they toyed around with actually encouraging off trail ATV and motor use in some of the front range burn areas as a way to do so.

So, while "let 'em burn" might sound good, as with all things in life, it isn't that simple. Let 'em burn correctly is probably a better phrase.

Once again, why not plant aspens in burn areas instead of conifers? Aspens don't seed, they sucker. Plant one aspen and it pokes right up through the soil from the root and you get about 400 aspens from one single tree.

That's why naturally aspens are always the first trees to appear after a burn.

Trouble is the aspen groves have been allowed to diminish after burns because the forest service in their genius have planted conifers in burn areas, therefore perpetuating burns.

Aspens don't seed. They DEPEND on burns so they can sucker into burned areas to proliferate. Aspens don't burn. Try to burn an aspen and see what you get. They depend on their survivability of an intense fire and reproduce from the root.

Que
06-18-2012, 03:04 PM
Once again, why not plant aspens in burn areas instead of conifers? Aspens don't seed, they sucker. Plant one aspen and it pokes right up through the soil from the root and you get about 400 aspens from one single tree.

That's why naturally aspens are always the first trees to appear after a burn.

Trouble is the aspen groves have been allowed to diminish after burns because the forest service in their genius have planted conifers in burn areas, therefore perpetuating burns.

Aspens don't seed. They DEPEND on burns so they can sucker into burned areas to proliferate. Aspens don't burn. Try to burn an aspen and see what you get. They depend on their survivability of an intense fire and reproduce from the root.

A really good question and one i've actually asked in the past. The quick answer is: you can't. The long answer is really more interesting.

You Can't. Because of the relatively unique way Aspens reproduce, you can't plant seedlings. Next time you are near a nursery or landscaping place, look at the smallest Aspen they have for replanting. They're pretty huge. They have to be in order to be severed from the rest of the grove and survive. And, like you said, you can't do it with seeds. So planting Aspen in your backyard or on a golf course is doable, doing it in the remote areas where the burns are isn't both economically and physically.

It isn't either/or. Aspen play a role in the whole lifecycle. Aspen are really part of the whole Montane lifecycle. After a burn (if it wasn't a high temperature burn) the soil is actually pretty rich. Caveat: have to factor in time measured in years here so "right after" might be a while to you and me. It is rich with decaying plant material and carbon from the burnt trees. The first thing to come back are some of the alpine grasses and fungi. Google "where do black morels grow" to see an example.

Shortly thereafter, Aspen start invading but Aspen love water. So you'll first see them grow in moisture soil along exposures that are naturally wetter. Notice next time you drive up I 70 what grows on north facing slopes vs. south facing. Aspen are fast growing and spreading.

Eventually, the evergreens will come back. It isn't a predator vs. prey thing but evergreens (if left unchecked) will eventually crowd out the Aspen. But, you can still have relatively dense aspen forests where the evergreens just can't make much progress or it takes them a long time. There is HUGE aspen forest a few miles from Crested Butte on the other side of Kebler Pass which is amazing. The Aspen are huge and stretch for miles. What is incredible is that the aspen are all connected - one giant organism if you will.

TIP: if you ever need a slam dunk deposit in the "bank of love", take her to that forest in the fall for a weekend trip. Can't miss.

But eventually, the evergreens win. I'm not sure if they over compete for water, if the needles turn the soil too acidic or if they eventually just own the canopy/sunlight - slow growing and long living (conifer) vs. fast growing and short living (aspen).

Then fire comes along (or a big windstorm) and burns down the evergreens. Whole cycle repeats itself. Kinda cool no? Aspen do have their negatives though. They support a whole different class of fauna than do evergreens. Also, while aspen are fire retardant, aren't plagued by beetles and insects, they are vulnerable to their own host of issues. Google "Sudden Aspen Decline". What sucks about that is that you're not talking about a tree getting sick, you're talking about the whole forest. SAD is actually a problem here in Colorado.

Clarification: The USFS doesn't replant evergreens all over the place. They do selective replanting in burn areas to spot seed the area for vegetation. They do (and this is realtively recently) reseed burn areas for mountain grasses ect. The goal there is really erosion mitigation - to keep the top soil from washing away. About the only folks who do the massive replanting are logging companies but that's a different story all together (no fire, no rotting vegetation, the forest needs help restoring itself after a clear cut).

Also, FWIW, the forestry industry views aspen as a low value tree vs. an evergreen. A lot of folks confuse the National Park Service with the US Forestry Service. They are two distinctly different missions. The NPS's mission is preservation of the park. Keep it wild and pristine (that still means letting it burn for time to time). The USFS is all about balancing all of the uses of the forest land (logging, mining, grazing, habitat, recreation). Notice the slogan on the next USFS sign you see - land of many uses. As one USFS official told me, with that mission you can never make anyone truly happy, you just basically try to keep every interest group equally upset with you - then you know you're doing your job right. Heh!

Hope that all makes sense. One thing is for sure, with the beetle kill and the climate change going on, our Colorado-an futures have more aspen and less evergreens in them.

Tombstone RJ
06-18-2012, 03:20 PM
A really good question and one i've actually asked in the past. The quick answer is: you can't. The long answer is really more interesting.

You Can't. Because of the relatively unique way Aspens reproduce, you can't plant seedlings. Next time you are near a nursery or landscaping place, look at the smallest Aspen they have for replanting. They're pretty huge. They have to be in order to be severed from the rest of the grove and survive. And, like you said, you can't do it with seeds. So planting Aspen in your backyard or on a golf course is doable, doing it in the remote areas where the burns are isn't both economically and physically.

It isn't either/or. Aspen play a role in the whole lifecycle. Aspen are really part of the whole Montane lifecycle. After a burn (if it wasn't a high temperature burn) the soil is actually pretty rich. Caveat: have to factor in time measured in years here so "right after" might be a while to you and me. It is rich with decaying plant material and carbon from the burnt trees. The first thing to come back are some of the alpine grasses and fungi. Google "where do black morels grow" to see an example.

Shortly thereafter, Aspen start invading but Aspen love water. So you'll first see them grow in moisture soil along exposures that are naturally wetter. Notice next time you drive up I 70 what grows on north facing slopes vs. south facing. Aspen are fast growing and spreading.

Eventually, the evergreens will come back. It isn't a predator vs. prey thing but evergreens (if left unchecked) will eventually crowd out the Aspen. But, you can still have relatively dense aspen forests where the evergreens just can't make much progress or it takes them a long time. There is HUGE aspen forest a few miles from Crested Butte on the other side of Kebler Pass which is amazing. The Aspen are huge and stretch for miles. What is incredible is that the aspen are all connected - one giant organism if you will.

TIP: if you ever need a slam dunk deposit in the "bank of love", take her to that forest in the fall for a weekend trip. Can't miss.

But eventually, the evergreens win. I'm not sure if they over compete for water, if the needles turn the soil too acidic or if they eventually just own the canopy/sunlight - slow growing and long living (conifer) vs. fast growing and short living (aspen).

Then fire comes along (or a big windstorm) and burns down the evergreens. Whole cycle repeats itself. Kinda cool no? Aspen do have their negatives though. They support a whole different class of fauna than do evergreens. Also, while aspen are fire retardant, aren't plagued by beetles and insects, they are vulnerable to their own host of issues. Google "Sudden Aspen Decline". What sucks about that is that you're not talking about a tree getting sick, you're talking about the whole forest. SAD is actually a problem here in Colorado.

Clarification: The USFS doesn't replant evergreens all over the place. They do selective replanting in burn areas to spot seed the area for vegetation. They do (and this is realtively recently) reseed burn areas for mountain grasses ect. The goal there is really erosion mitigation - to keep the top soil from washing away. About the only folks who do the massive replanting are logging companies but that's a different story all together (no fire, no rotting vegetation, the forest needs help restoring itself after a clear cut).

Also, FWIW, the forestry industry views aspen as a low value tree vs. an evergreen. A lot of folks confuse the National Park Service with the US Forestry Service. They are two distinctly different missions. The NPS's mission is preservation of the park. Keep it wild and pristine (that still means letting it burn for time to time). The USFS is all about balancing all of the uses of the forest land (logging, mining, grazing, habitat, recreation). Notice the slogan on the next USFS sign you see - land of many uses. As one USFS official told me, with that mission you can never make anyone truly happy, you just basically try to keep every interest group equally upset with you - then you know you're doing your job right. Heh!

Hope that all makes sense. One thing is for sure, with the beetle kill and the climate change going on, our Colorado-an futures have more aspen and less evergreens in them.

Speaking of Aspens (I live in the Tetons) the "scientists" or "biologists" or whatever you want to call them have been perplexed trying to figure out why all the Aspens have been in rapid decline. So get this:

Ok, I live in freak city central for over-the-top environmentalists who are so far out of whack with reality that the litterally can't see the forest through the friggen trees--right? Morons, is another good name for these types of people. Well anyway, so we got the wolfs back--yeah! Hey everyone, look, a wolf!! WHOOP-DEE-FRIGGEN-DOO!

So the environmentalists are all happy about the wolf.

So guess what. The wolfs are killing off the elk and deer populations--OH NO!! Imagine that! Fauna poplulations are declining and wolf populations are increasing--really, yah think?

So now the Aspens are all of a sudden doing better--why you ask? (I'm glad you asked btw). Well because the fauna (elk or deer or whatever) were killing the Aspens. Now that there are less fauna, the Aspens are doing better!!

But the environmentalist morons wanted to blame---bump-bump-bummppp!! music) CLIMATE CHANGE.

Yep, all the world problems are do to climate change. Even them poor dying off Aspens---NOT!

Cito Pelon
06-18-2012, 03:25 PM
A really good question and one i've actually asked in the past. The quick answer is: you can't. The long answer is really more interesting.

You Can't. Because of the relatively unique way Aspens reproduce, you can't plant seedlings. Next time you are near a nursery or landscaping place, look at the smallest Aspen they have for replanting. They're pretty huge. They have to be in order to be severed from the rest of the grove and survive. And, like you said, you can't do it with seeds. So planting Aspen in your backyard or on a golf course is doable, doing it in the remote areas where the burns are isn't both economically and physically.

It isn't either/or. Aspen play a role in the whole lifecycle. Aspen are really part of the whole Montane lifecycle. After a burn (if it wasn't a high temperature burn) the soil is actually pretty rich. Caveat: have to factor in time measured in years here so "right after" might be a while to you and me. It is rich with decaying plant material and carbon from the burnt trees. The first thing to come back are some of the alpine grasses and fungi. Google "where do black morels grow" to see an example.

Shortly thereafter, Aspen start invading but Aspen love water. So you'll first see them grow in moisture soil along exposures that are naturally wetter. Notice next time you drive up I 70 what grows on north facing slopes vs. south facing. Aspen are fast growing and spreading.

Eventually, the evergreens will come back. It isn't a predator vs. prey thing but evergreens (if left unchecked) will eventually crowd out the Aspen. But, you can still have relatively dense aspen forests where the evergreens just can't make much progress or it takes them a long time. There is HUGE aspen forest a few miles from Crested Butte on the other side of Kebler Pass which is amazing. The Aspen are huge and stretch for miles. What is incredible is that the aspen are all connected - one giant organism if you will.

TIP: if you ever need a slam dunk deposit in the "bank of love", take her to that forest in the fall for a weekend trip. Can't miss.

But eventually, the evergreens win. I'm not sure if they over compete for water, if the needles turn the soil too acidic or if they eventually just own the canopy/sunlight - slow growing and long living (conifer) vs. fast growing and short living (aspen).

Then fire comes along (or a big windstorm) and burns down the evergreens. Whole cycle repeats itself. Kinda cool no? Aspen do have their negatives though. They support a whole different class of fauna than do evergreens. Also, while aspen are fire retardant, aren't plagued by beetles and insects, they are vulnerable to their own host of issues. Google "Sudden Aspen Decline". What sucks about that is that you're not talking about a tree getting sick, you're talking about the whole forest. SAD is actually a problem here in Colorado.

Clarification: The USFS doesn't replant evergreens all over the place. They do selective replanting in burn areas to spot seed the area for vegetation. They do (and this is realtively recently) reseed burn areas for mountain grasses ect. The goal there is really erosion mitigation - to keep the top soil from washing away. About the only folks who do the massive replanting are logging companies but that's a different story all together (no fire, no rotting vegetation, the forest needs help restoring itself after a clear cut).

Also, FWIW, the forestry industry views aspen as a low value tree vs. an evergreen. A lot of folks confuse the National Park Service with the US Forestry Service. They are two distinctly different missions. The NPS's mission is preservation of the park. Keep it wild and pristine (that still means letting it burn for time to time). The USFS is all about balancing all of the uses of the forest land (logging, mining, grazing, habitat, recreation). Notice the slogan on the next USFS sign you see - land of many uses. As one USFS official told me, with that mission you can never make anyone truly happy, you just basically try to keep every interest group equally upset with you - then you know you're doing your job right. Heh!

Hope that all makes sense. One thing is for sure, with the beetle kill and the climate change going on, our Colorado-an futures have more aspen and less evergreens in them.

Good answer, nice to see something complete like that. Very nice.

But, you're putting up arguments for not planting aspens, and I don't think it's ever been tried before. All I've ever seen is re-planting conifers, and we know that is not so good. Tell me if you've ever seen a replanting scheme that included aspens.

There used to be huge groves of aspens all over Colorado (not just in a few places), and of course the conifers eventually will overtake them, but they were always the first to cover a burn. This is a long-standing issue with a lot of people.

The conifers will eventually take over, but there's enough burns where the aspen can can continue to be firebreaks if left alone instead of replanting conifers right away.

cutthemdown
06-18-2012, 03:31 PM
In other words, a deciduous forest renews itself by burning every few hundred years. It's a totally natural cycle and when people build homes in a deciduous forest, well, be prepared to burn baby.

I have no sympathy for people who have property in a deciduous forest. None. That includes mountain ski town people. Sorry people, the forest will burn and the longer you prevent the burn, the worse it will be when it does burn because there is soooo much fuel for the fire (dead trees).

I have sympathy for anyone that loses their home, but I don't feel a liability to them. People in the forest either take the risk or have to pay buku books for insurance.

My cousin has a killer hand build split log cabin in Buela Colo and he spends tons of money and time trying to keep it safe from a potential fire. For sure I would feel really bad for him if it burnt. His Great grandfather built it during the depression when they came west from back east.

Tombstone RJ
06-18-2012, 03:39 PM
I have sympathy for anyone that loses their home, but I don't feel a liability to them. People in the forest either take the risk or have to pay buku books for insurance.

My cousin has a killer hand build split log cabin in Buela Colo and he spends tons of money and time trying to keep it safe from a potential fire. For sure I would feel really bad for him if it burnt. His Great grandfather built it during the depression when they came west from back east.

I have friends who have lost property in forest fires (the big fire about 10 years ago that was west of Colorado Springs, burned up a little town called Deckers that I used to go to as a kid) and it's never easy to swallow. However the massive influx of growth in Colorado is going to come back and bite a lot of people in the butt.

The state cannot maintain the water supply growth, period. That alone, coupled with drought due to lack of snow and rain is going to wreak havoc all over the state.

Fedaykin
06-18-2012, 03:44 PM
Jeez, this fire is up to 60k acres now and only 45% containment, close to 2000 firefighters now. Pagosa Springs has a 12k acre fire going, now another fire down by 11 Mile. New Mexico and Arizona had the big fires earlier. Yeesh, a lot of cleanout of forest going.

Denver Water has spent about a year cleaning out the silt from the Hayman fire from that big Strontia Springs reservoir. They said they dug enough silt from it to fill Mile High. Horsetooth is next for that kind of operation. Eh, maybe there's a bright side to all this.

It'll be an interesting operation in at the south end of the lake where there is a submerged city (mostly just foundations, etc.). Dredging that end will be difficult with all that there.

Fedaykin
06-18-2012, 03:47 PM
Once again, why not plant aspens in burn areas instead of conifers? Aspens don't seed, they sucker. Plant one aspen and it pokes right up through the soil from the root and you get about 400 aspens from one single tree.

That's why naturally aspens are always the first trees to appear after a burn.

Trouble is the aspen groves have been allowed to diminish after burns because the forest service in their genius have planted conifers in burn areas, therefore perpetuating burns.

Aspens don't seed. They DEPEND on burns so they can sucker into burned areas to proliferate. Aspens don't burn. Try to burn an aspen and see what you get. They depend on their survivability of an intense fire and reproduce from the root.

Only conifers are going to be able to thrive in the climate of the area. In general, conifers are far more drought tolerant due to their leaf structure (which is the same reason they don't drop their leaves). Confers have a very thick waxy coating on their leaves which traps moisture. Deciduous leaves are much less water efficient.

Fedaykin
06-18-2012, 03:51 PM
Speaking of Aspens (I live in the Tetons) the "scientists" or "biologists" or whatever you want to call them have been perplexed trying to figure out why all the Aspens have been in rapid decline. So get this:

Ok, I live in freak city central for over-the-top environmentalists who are so far out of whack with reality that the litterally can't see the forest through the friggen trees--right? Morons, is another good name for these types of people. Well anyway, so we got the wolfs back--yeah! Hey everyone, look, a wolf!! WHOOP-DEE-FRIGGEN-DOO!

So the environmentalists are all happy about the wolf.

So guess what. The wolfs are killing off the elk and deer populations--OH NO!! Imagine that! Fauna poplulations are declining and wolf populations are increasing--really, yah think?

So now the Aspens are all of a sudden doing better--why you ask? (I'm glad you asked btw). Well because the fauna (elk or deer or whatever) were killing the Aspens. Now that there are less fauna, the Aspens are doing better!!

But the environmentalist morons wanted to blame---bump-bump-bummppp!! music) CLIMATE CHANGE.

Yep, all the world problems are do to climate change. Even them poor dying off Aspens---NOT!

methinks ye need to check the definition of "fauna". It doesn't mean what you seem to think it means. =)

Cito Pelon
06-18-2012, 04:07 PM
Only conifers are going to be able to thrive in the climate of the area. In general, conifers are far more drought tolerant due to their leaf structure (which is the same reason they don't drop their leaves). Confers have a very thick waxy coating on their leaves which traps moisture. Deciduous leaves are much less water efficient.

I disagree. Maybe down towards 6000 ft the aspens won't be sustaining. Above that, they'll be able to hold. Remember, aspens only have about a 20 year life. They'll eventually be taken over naturally by the conifers.

BUT, and this is important, meanwhile they've established a foothold for their colonies that will mitigate fires in the future. I know you and Que realize this, you're just being argumentative.

Que
06-18-2012, 06:14 PM
I disagree. Maybe down towards 6000 ft the aspens won't be sustaining. Above that, they'll be able to hold. Remember, aspens only have about a 20 year life. They'll eventually be taken over naturally by the conifers.

BUT, and this is important, meanwhile they've established a foothold for their colonies that will mitigate fires in the future. I know you and Que realize this, you're just being argumentative.

Heh! This is a really cool conversation. I guess I keep coming back to what is economically and physically possible. Here is a quote from an actually interesting paper:

"Although aspen does produce viable seed and seedling regeneration has been documented (Kay 1993, Romme et al. 1997, Quinn and Wu 2001), vegetative regeneration is a much more reliable method to regenerate aspen. Planting aspen seedlings is extremely difficult and costly (Shepperd and Mata 2005) and not practical as a wildland management alternative."

http://www.safnet.org/fp/documents/aspen_mgt_08.pdf

One thing that I learned is that they have been able to produce viable aspen seed recently that was used to cultivate seedlings. So perhaps that can change things in terms of forestry management. Check out that paper. It is pretty interesting. Sounds like aspen are starting to be farmed for fiber production. Which is really cool as it is a fast growing tree. I personally love aspen - have seven in my little yard and I live in a place with some bonkers aspen forests.

They have been doing a bunch of selectI've clear cutting up in Lost Creek Park to make meadows. What is cool is that just a few years after you can see the aspen already starting to take over. Great fire breaks!

Cito Pelon
06-18-2012, 06:33 PM
Heh! This is a really cool conversation. I guess I keep coming back to what is economically and physically possible. Here is a quote from an actually interesting paper:

"Although aspen does produce viable seed and seedling regeneration has been documented (Kay 1993, Romme et al. 1997, Quinn and Wu 2001), vegetative regeneration is a much more reliable method to regenerate aspen. Planting aspen seedlings is extremely difficult and costly (Shepperd and Mata 2005) and not practical as a wildland management alternative."

http://www.safnet.org/fp/documents/aspen_mgt_08.pdf

One thing that I learned is that they have been able to produce viable aspen seed recently that was used to cultivate seedlings. So perhaps that can change things in terms of forestry management. Check out that paper. It is pretty interesting. Sounds like aspen are starting to be farmed for fiber production. Which is really cool as it is a fast growing tree. I personally love aspen - have seven in my little yard and I live in a place with some bonkers aspen forests.

They have been doing a bunch of selectI've clear cutting up in Lost Creek Park to make meadows. What is cool is that just a few years after you can see the aspen already starting to take over. Great fire breaks!

I like that. This is what I'm saying - "vegetative regeneration is a much more reliable method to regenerate aspen".

Plant the aspens and they will reproduce. They will reproduce long enough to provide firebreaks. And they will survive fires and produce their own colonies.

I don't care if it's only one aspen you have to plant, or 500 of them, but Colorado needs aspens, and because of "forestry management" the aspen colonies have been reduced. I think that may be a problem.

maher_tyler
06-19-2012, 06:35 AM
I have friends who have lost property in forest fires (the big fire about 10 years ago that was west of Colorado Springs, burned up a little town called Deckers that I used to go to as a kid) and it's never easy to swallow. However the massive influx of growth in Colorado is going to come back and bite a lot of people in the butt.

The state cannot maintain the water supply growth, period. That alone, coupled with drought due to lack of snow and rain is going to wreak havoc all over the state.

Colorado isn't the only place with drought issues...most of the country hardly got any snow all winter...

Vegas_Bronco
06-19-2012, 11:37 AM
Crested butte is a great place...i was up there last summer. Did you grow up there?

Tombstone RJ
06-19-2012, 12:09 PM
methinks ye need to check the definition of "fauna". It doesn't mean what you seem to think it means. =)

I know what fauna means: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/fauna

Fedaykin
06-19-2012, 03:34 PM
I like that. This is what I'm saying - "vegetative regeneration is a much more reliable method to regenerate aspen".

Plant the aspens and they will reproduce. They will reproduce long enough to provide firebreaks. And they will survive fires and produce their own colonies.

I don't care if it's only one aspen you have to plant, or 500 of them, but Colorado needs aspens, and because of "forestry management" the aspen colonies have been reduced. I think that may be a problem.

I agree with you for places where aspens will actually be able to live, but in this particular burn area they are going to die from lack of moisture. Not nearly enough or consistent moisture. Even hearty, low moisture tolerant conifers barely eek out a living. Have you been to the area?

Que
06-19-2012, 06:10 PM
Crested butte is a great place...i was up there last summer. Did you grow up there?

I wish. We moved here in 2006. Winter rocks but this place goes off in the summer no? Glad you came up!

Cito Pelon
06-23-2012, 10:57 PM
I agree with you for places where aspens will actually be able to live, but in this particular burn area they are going to die from lack of moisture. Not nearly enough or consistent moisture. Even hearty, low moisture tolerant conifers barely eek out a living. Have you been to the area?

Barely eek out a living? Please. What do you think is burning? Jebus. There's conifers as far as the eye can see, and that is what is burning. What, you think it's Kansas? You think it's grasslands that are burning? Jebus, unbelievable.

83,000 acres now, and all of it conifers. But according to you conifers can barely eek out a living on 83,000 contiguous acres. Ignorance.

TheChamp247
06-24-2012, 05:42 AM
didnt want to make a new fire thread cuz im sure id get yelled at lol, but the springs is totally trying to copy this whole 'high park fire' thing. always some new fad huh? but no seriously this is insane, so many fires and so many put in horrible situations. i hope they get all this contained before anyone else looses anymore. sad stuff. wouldnt be suprised if this one here in the springs is arson considering all the recent stuff.

bronco militia
06-24-2012, 09:00 AM
Manitou springs was evacuated at 130am......the fire will probably head to woodland park and rampart resevoir this afternoon. Parts of the west side of colorado springs were evacuated yesterday.

Tombstone RJ
06-24-2012, 09:05 AM
Manitou springs was evacuated at 130am......the fire will probably head to woodland park and rampart resevoir this afternoon. Parts of the west side of colorado springs were evacuated yesterday.

yikes, I grew up on the Southwest side of Colorado Springs.

bronco militia
06-24-2012, 09:14 AM
yikes, I grew up on the Southwest side of Colorado Springs.

The fire started in waldo canyon, right behind cave of the winds. Cascade andgreen mountain falls have also been avacuated.

They are expectting 100 temps today, but reletively light winds

Cito Pelon
06-24-2012, 09:40 AM
I agree with you for places where aspens will actually be able to live, but in this particular burn area they are going to die from lack of moisture. Not nearly enough or consistent moisture. Even hearty, low moisture tolerant conifers barely eek out a living. Have you been to the area?

Well, I was being an asshole in my earlier post, so I'll relax and answer you properly.

SOME of them will die from lack of moisture, especially those on the south-facing slopes. Above 8000 ft those on the north slopes will do fine, despite the current drought we're in.

In fact, it's said since 2000 apx 15-20% of aspens have died off in Colorado, mostly attributable to the drought. Google "aspen decline in colorado" and there's a lot of articles about it.

My point is, it's goofy to replant conifers after a burn, which is typically what happens. I've never seen ANYTHING about planting aspen seedlings after a burn. I'd like to see it done, what could it hurt? With aspen groves on the decline, there's less that move into burn areas naturally, and by planting conifer seedlings after a burn they take up the space that aspen might have moved into.

It would be one hell of a lot easier to contain these fires if there were large aspen groves in the forests instead of endless expanses of conifers. It's worth a try at least.

Cito Pelon
06-24-2012, 09:57 AM
Since I'm on the subject, one more aspect that has to be considered about replanting conifers - bark beetles. You replant conifers, and they're gonna die also because the bark beetles will eventually move in and kill them. You're right back where you started from, a conifer-heavy forest ripe for catastrophic fires.

Cito Pelon
06-24-2012, 10:19 AM
Manitou springs was evacuated at 130am......the fire will probably head to woodland park and rampart resevoir this afternoon. Parts of the west side of colorado springs were evacuated yesterday.

And I believe some of your local engine companies are up north fighting the High Park fire. They were anyway. Those poor slobs have been and will be working their asses off.

Johnykbr
06-24-2012, 11:03 AM
Manitou springs was evacuated at 130am......the fire will probably head to woodland park and rampart resevoir this afternoon. Parts of the west side of colorado springs were evacuated yesterday.

It sounds like it is actually heading toward the Air Force Academy with the way the winds are blowing

bronco militia
06-24-2012, 11:50 AM
It sounds like it is actually heading toward the Air Force Academy with the way the winds are blowing

That's one side of the fire. Now the big concern is ute pass and woodland park. The winds are out of the east, southeast and they are now starting evacuations in parts of woodland park.....evacuation centers in woodland park are now moving to the springs

Cito Pelon
06-24-2012, 05:19 PM
http://www.inciweb.org/incident/2904/

They're doing their best.

rugbythug
06-24-2012, 05:39 PM
Everybody wants a Boogeyman, but this is how it works. Burns are normal.

Johnykbr
06-24-2012, 05:48 PM
That's one side of the fire. Now the big concern is ute pass and woodland park. The winds are out of the east, southeast and they are now starting evacuations in parts of woodland park.....evacuation centers in woodland park are now moving to the springs

Yeah I saw they are evacuating parts of WP. Unfortunately they can't evacuate from there so they are moving the centers from WPHS to Divide. It will take quite a ways for people to get down to the front range now.

Cito Pelon
06-24-2012, 06:07 PM
Everybody wants a Boogeyman, but this is how it works. Burns are normal.

Riiiight. Trouble is there's issues with controlled burns, and lack of controlled burns. Things you don't concern yourself with since you think all that is important is what YOU want to do.

Until of course you need help from the government to bail you out, then you're fine with government.

st.bernard
06-24-2012, 07:26 PM
With the drought and beetle kill, it is hardly surprising. There are a few folks within the forest service that think that from I70 - I80 will eventually go up in flames.

Archer81
06-24-2012, 08:24 PM
Air tanker fleet gets cut + half assed BLM policies + people freaking out about controlled burns + ridiculously dry winter and hot spring and summer, and you get the misery currently sweeping AZ, NM, Colo, Utah and Washington state.

I'm 50 miles from the fire west of Colorado Springs. Lots of haze and you can see the smoke over the mountains. Supposed to be 107 tomorrow. Praying for the people alot closer to those fires than I am.

:Broncos:

Fedaykin
06-25-2012, 01:46 PM
bump for updates in OP

bronco militia
06-25-2012, 02:02 PM
two c-130s' with the MAFFS from Wyoming's ANG along with two more c-130's from Peterson AFB have just started making drops along the front range. Highway 24 is still closed and people needing to get to the springs have to travel to canon city and then use hyw 115.

3600+ acres, no containment.

bronco militia
06-25-2012, 02:03 PM
live coverage:

http://kktv.com/video/live

bronco militia
06-25-2012, 02:05 PM
info for all fires:

http://www.inciweb.org

mhgaffney
06-25-2012, 03:02 PM
Looks like Rist Canyon has burned completely.

Cito Pelon
06-25-2012, 03:56 PM
Dang High Park fire is well established north of the Poudre now. They tried their best to hold it there in the canyon, but no go. It'll keep racing north now. 105 degrees, 5% humidity, and won't be less than 95 for the rest of the week.

The Springer fire down by Pagosa Springs won't be out for a while also. Zero containment on Waldo isn't a good sign, that can travel a long way north and west up into Tarryall. The Hayman burn is north of Waldo, so there's not much to sustain it there. But basically it looks like maybe Waldo will burn what Hayman didn't up to 285 and Rampart Range. Jebus. The firefighting resources are stretched to the limit already, they don't have any more resources.

bronco militia
06-25-2012, 04:58 PM
Dang High Park fire is well established north of the Poudre now. They tried their best to hold it there in the canyon, but no go. It'll keep racing north now. 105 degrees, 5% humidity, and won't be less than 95 for the rest of the week.

The Springer fire down by Pagosa Springs won't be out for a while also. Zero containment on Waldo isn't a good sign, that can travel a long way north and west up into Tarryall. The Hayman burn is north of Waldo, so there's not much to sustain it there. But basically it looks like maybe Waldo will burn what Hayman didn't up to 285 and Rampart Range. Jebus. The firefighting resources are stretched to the limit already, they don't have any more resources.
The springer fire is 100% contained (lake george). The waldo canyon fire is no where near the hayman area. Right now they are more worried about the fire crossing ute pass into cascade, woodland park and pikes peak. Also manitou springs, mountain shadows in colorado springs. Rampart range road is the fire line on the north side of the fire.

Tim
06-25-2012, 05:26 PM
The springer fire is 100% contained (lake george). The waldo canyon fire is no where near the hayman area. Right now they are more worried about the fire crossing ute pass into cascade, woodland park and pikes peak. Also manitou springs, mountain shadows in colorado springs. Rampart range road is the fire line on the north side of the fire.

I think you have the hayman fire confused with something else.

Cmac821
06-25-2012, 05:59 PM
It's so hot in Fort Collins, already feel on fire with out the high park one

Cito Pelon
06-25-2012, 06:02 PM
The springer fire is 100% contained (lake george). The waldo canyon fire is no where near the hayman area. Right now they are more worried about the fire crossing ute pass into cascade, woodland park and pikes peak. Also manitou springs, mountain shadows in colorado springs. Rampart range road is the fire line on the north side of the fire.

I was thinking of the Little Sand fire west of Pagosa Springs, that's only 31% containment and not a lot of hope. Not many structures threatened, so not much attempt at containment.

If Waldo spreads north of Woodland Park it will be getting close to the Hayman burn. Hayman was only about 15 miles NW of Woodland Park up toward Deckers. It's east of the S. Platte I'm sure they're worried about and of course to the south and west.

bronco militia
06-25-2012, 07:39 PM
I was thinking of the Little Sand fire west of Pagosa Springs, that's only 31% containment and not a lot of hope. Not many structures threatened, so not much attempt at containment.

If Waldo spreads north of Woodland Park it will be getting close to the Hayman burn. Hayman was only about 15 miles NW of Woodland Park up toward Deckers. It's east of the S. Platte I'm sure they're worried about and of course to the south and west.

Never say never, but unless our poles flip and or prevailing winds change fr.om west to east, I don't see the fire moving farther east than woodland park. The fire is now moving north behind the air force academy in Queens canyon.

scorpio
06-26-2012, 08:50 AM
“Do any of your resources happen to include weather control satellites?” (http://citydesk.freedomblogging.com/2012/06/25/quote-of-the-day-waldo-canyon-fire/16304/)

bronco militia
06-26-2012, 08:58 AM
“Do any of your resources happen to include weather control satellites?” (http://citydesk.freedomblogging.com/2012/06/25/quote-of-the-day-waldo-canyon-fire/16304/)

bwahaha

myMind
06-26-2012, 10:34 AM
“Do any of your resources happen to include weather control satellites?” (http://citydesk.freedomblogging.com/2012/06/25/quote-of-the-day-waldo-canyon-fire/16304/)

That very well could have been Gaffe. I kind of have always read his posts through the voice of an old woman.

broncocalijohn
06-26-2012, 12:11 PM
That very well could have been Gaffe. I kind of have always read his posts through the voice of an old woman.

THere we have it. Gaff is all over the weather satellites. You know Obama runs the satellites and reason why Texas had such a bad drought lately. I see some bad weather coming to Arizona too.

Meck77
06-26-2012, 03:23 PM
Fire reported just outside of Boulder..... Looked like it was going to rain over the rockies but then the clouds just disappeared. At least some cloud cover has rolled in.

myMind
06-26-2012, 05:03 PM
Fire reported just outside of Boulder..... Looked like it was going to rain over the rockies but then the clouds just disappeared. At least some cloud cover has rolled in.

Yeah I was driving to DIA on E470 and saw the smoke.

Tim
06-26-2012, 09:04 PM
32,000 evacuated from the waldo fire sounds like a big deal

Broncojef
06-26-2012, 09:15 PM
AirForce Academy evacuated showing many burning homes in the Waldo fire...very depressing.

ak1971
06-26-2012, 09:22 PM
AirForce Academy evacuated showing many burning homes in the Waldo fire...very depressing.

No deaths...everything else can be rebuilt

scorpio
06-26-2012, 09:22 PM
It sounds like most of northwest Colorado Springs has been evacuated. This is crazy.

pricejj
06-26-2012, 09:32 PM
From the news, it looks like the whole northwest side of the Springs is getting torched.

razorwire77
06-26-2012, 09:44 PM
From the news, it looks like the whole northwest side of the Springs is getting torched.

Crazy. From what people are saying, the fire isn't "near" Colorado Springs like many news agencies are reporting, but rather it is in Colorado Springs. The weather forecast for the next week isn't encouraging either. Sucks.

Hercules Rockefeller
06-26-2012, 09:49 PM
From the news, it looks like the whole northwest side of the Springs is getting torched.

It is. The area it's burning is huge.

razorwire77
06-26-2012, 10:05 PM
Good God.

http://www.9news.com/news/article/274327/71/LIVE-32000-evacuated-as-Waldo-Canyon-Fire-explodes

theAPAOps5
06-26-2012, 10:17 PM
Crazy. From what people are saying, the fire isn't "near" Colorado Springs like many news agencies are reporting, but rather it is in Colorado Springs. The weather forecast for the next week isn't encouraging either. Sucks.

It wasn't in the city until a thunderstorm came through and blew it over a ridge. Now they are doing everything they can to save houses. Mutual aid from Denver, Callahan, fort Carson, and cities all over are en route to help. It's organized chaos listening to the scanner. Fire fighters are giving it everything they have.

Fedaykin
06-26-2012, 11:20 PM
Crazy. From what people are saying, the fire isn't "near" Colorado Springs like many news agencies are reporting, but rather it is in Colorado Springs. The weather forecast for the next week isn't encouraging either. Sucks.

It's not in the city proper, but it's in urban areas west of the city, and threatening to expand into Co Springs.

This is a very bad situation.

Broncoman13
06-26-2012, 11:21 PM
I was in the Springs today for work. High winds all day. When we got there this morning, smoke was covering the mountains and most of the City... But you really couldn't see the fire from I 25. By 1:00 you could see the fire creeping over the mountains/hills and was visible from I25. That was before the stronger winds blew through. We saw a couple C-130s circling the fire. Only so much they can do. I pray they can save the Air Force Academy. Still a ways south of the AFA, but not a lot to stop it I don't think.

The Air Force Academy is being evacuated now. The Flying W Ranch was destroyed. And the fire will only grow in size. The thunderstorms aren't bringing any rain to help, only wind and more lightning strikes. Many in Colo. Spgs. believe this fire was started by an arsonist. I don't get people sometimes.

24champ
06-26-2012, 11:24 PM
Tough to watch the videos, hope everyone stays safe.

bronco militia
06-26-2012, 11:34 PM
Flying w ranch is gone and so is most of mountain shadows. Waiting to hear what is burning in Rockrimmon and in garden of the gods. We may have also lost glen eryie.

I live directly across from this area, but on the other side of i-25. I grew up in rockrimmon and went to high school on the academy. I have a bad feeling these areas will be under the gun tomorrow.

Fedaykin
06-26-2012, 11:42 PM
This is quickly approaching worst case scenario:

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site36/2012/0626/20120626_084116_colorado_wildfire_waldo_canyon_ins ide.jpg

Fedaykin
06-26-2012, 11:44 PM
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C130Herkload
06-27-2012, 12:02 AM
Ive got quite a few friends doing the MAFFS mission up there now and I expect they are hard at it (Good Luck and Go get 'em boys). Im from C Spgs and also fly the Herk as an active AF Loadmaster; really sucks that I cant be there to help. The visibility has been horrible, coupled with the winds at their drop altitudes-think like 150 ft. I think they'll hit it hard come daybreak. Just so much they can do. We may see the big Evergreen 747 firefighter on this one as well. Not gonna be pretty when this ones done...

Fedaykin
06-27-2012, 12:10 AM
Ive got quite a few friends doing the MAFFS mission up there now and I expect they are hard at it (Good Luck and Go get 'em boys). Im from C Spgs and also fly the Herk as an active AF Loadmaster; really sucks that I cant be there to help. The visibility has been horrible, coupled with the winds at their drop altitudes-think like 150 ft. I think they'll hit it hard come daybreak. Just so much they can do. We may see the big Evergreen 747 firefighter on this one as well. Not gonna be pretty when this ones done...

This is by far the worst fire season on record for Colorado, and it's only just begun. This fire is currently in a major urban area (CO Springs is what 450,000?) and needs "everything and the kitchen sink" thrown at it.

bronco militia
06-27-2012, 12:13 AM
Ive got quite a few friends doing the MAFFS mission up there now and I expect they are hard at it (Good Luck and Go get 'em boys). Im from C Spgs and also fly the Herk as an active AF Loadmaster; really sucks that I cant be there to help. The visibility has been horrible, coupled with the winds at their drop altitudes-think like 150 ft. I think they'll hit it hard come daybreak. Just so much they can do. We may see the big Evergreen 747 firefighter on this one as well. Not gonna be pretty when this ones done...

Yeah...been cool to watch them make their drops and then land right at peterson. Two hercs from wyoming and two from here are doing what they can statewide.

Fedaykin
06-27-2012, 12:23 AM
http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/chieftain.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/b7/eb717bfe-c007-11e1-ba31-001a4bcf887a/4fea7d7481842.image.jpg

ol#7
06-27-2012, 04:17 AM
Jesus what a nightmare. Stay safe everyone. Been overseas for a couple of years and no longer have a house in the Springs but my daughter is still there...This is a nightmare.

Rother8
06-27-2012, 04:47 AM
I was in the Springs today for work. High winds all day. When we got there this morning, smoke was covering the mountains and most of the City... But you really couldn't see the fire from I 25. By 1:00 you could see the fire creeping over the mountains/hills and was visible from I25. That was before the stronger winds blew through. We saw a couple C-130s circling the fire. Only so much they can do. I pray they can save the Air Force Academy. Still a ways south of the AFA, but not a lot to stop it I don't think.

The Air Force Academy is being evacuated now. The Flying W Ranch was destroyed. And the fire will only grow in size. The thunderstorms aren't bringing any rain to help, only wind and more lightning strikes. Many in Colo. Spgs. believe this fire was started by an arsonist. I don't get people sometimes.

This
http://www.buzzfeed.com/expresident/pictures-that-will-restore-your-faith-in-humanity

and
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/P6XMwu-I6aE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
made my day better

UberBroncoMan
06-27-2012, 05:16 AM
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/557246_10151855434085567_449679796_n.jpg

I think a home I lived in there has been destroyed as well.

lolcopter
06-27-2012, 07:15 AM
This is insane :( :( :(

Ray Finkle
06-27-2012, 07:22 AM
wow,
this is awful, hopeful they can contain this soon.

bronco militia
06-27-2012, 07:40 AM
live local coverage streaming from one of the news stations.

http://www.kktv.com/video/live

bronco militia
06-27-2012, 07:43 AM
http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/chieftain.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/b7/eb717bfe-c007-11e1-ba31-001a4bcf887a/4fea7d7481842.image.jpg

oh wow...what a pic. I installed most of the water piping in those townhomes/apartments a million years ago in the foreground. That's at Centenial and Vindicator.

maher_tyler
06-27-2012, 07:47 AM
Wow! All you can really hope and pray for at this point is that people get out alive! Insane!

bronco militia
06-27-2012, 07:57 AM
Wow! All you can really hope and pray for at this point is that people get out alive! Insane!

the people were evacuated several days ago. So far we have not suffered and known fatalities or injuries from the fire.

chickennob2
06-27-2012, 08:07 AM
http://i.imgur.com/10Z4L.jpg

Colorado Springs

(via reddit)

ghwk
06-27-2012, 08:14 AM
Has Pat Robertson come out and said what Colorado is being punished for yet? I have cousins in the Springs, hopefully they haven't been hit by this. What a mess.

bronco militia
06-27-2012, 08:18 AM
Has Pat Robertson come out and said what Colorado is being punished for yet? I have cousins in the Springs, hopefully they haven't been hit by this. What a mess.

little known Tebow effect?

sorry, a little gallows humor.

maher_tyler
06-27-2012, 08:59 AM
http://i.imgur.com/10Z4L.jpg

Colorado Springs

(via reddit)

Looks like a volcano...

Drunken.Broncoholic
06-27-2012, 09:02 AM
Looks like a volcano...

Dam that's crazy. Must be a huge amount of ash in the air.

JJG
06-27-2012, 09:20 AM
Stay safe everyone. I grew up in the springs and still have family there. My mom who lives in black forest told me she couldn't see more than a mile at one point yesterday because the smoke was so thick. This is hitting too close to home

oubronco
06-27-2012, 09:43 AM
http://i.imgur.com/10Z4L.jpg

Colorado Springs

(via reddit)

Looks like an atomic bomb went off

ludo21
06-27-2012, 09:44 AM
my whole family lives there. Praying it doesnt spread into town!

BroncoBeavis
06-27-2012, 10:01 AM
That is friggin scary. Especially to see it creeping into residential zones like that. You kind of think of cities as immune until you see something that size bearing down.

24champ
06-27-2012, 10:26 AM
http://i.imgur.com/10Z4L.jpg

Colorado Springs

(via reddit)

Jesus.

Gutless Drunk
06-27-2012, 10:49 AM
31077

bronco militia
06-27-2012, 11:01 AM
that was a few minutes before the wind shifted from the south to the north from the out flow of a thunderstorm in douglas county. the wind pushed the flames down the foothills into the mountain shadows neighbood (below the scar and not pictured). The neighborhood (Peregrin) you see above and behind the stadium did not lose any houses. This is a very dramatic photo, but it is kind of misleading. The strip of trees just below the homes and above the stadium are burning as I type this. That is about 5 linear miles away from the stadium.

maher_tyler
06-27-2012, 11:17 AM
that was a few minutes before the wind shifted from the south to the north from the out flow of a thunderstorm in douglas county. the wind pushed the flames down the foothills into the mountain shadows neighbood (below the scar and not pictured). The neighborhood (Peregrin) you see above and behind the stadium did not lose any houses. This is a very dramatic photo, but it is kind of misleading. The strip of trees just below the homes and above the stadium are burning as I type this. That is about 5 linear miles away from the stadium.

This is insane. You think they could get some more help it being the AFA in all. Hope this thing is burned out in the next month...ill be driving that way on my way up to the Dakotas...

bronco militia
06-27-2012, 11:34 AM
This is insane. You think they could get some more help it being the AFA in all. Hope this thing is burned out in the next month...ill be driving that way on my way up to the Dakotas...

the winds were over 50 mph and the fire jumped the slury drops the c-130's and other bombers had been laying down all after noon. The only thing that will help fight this fire is the weather. :(

WolfpackGuy
06-27-2012, 11:36 AM
31077

Damn, that's crazy.

The fires make make those hills quite different looking than when I was in the area a few years ago.

Hope they get things under control.

Spider
06-27-2012, 11:38 AM
Clearly this is Brian Griese fault

maher_tyler
06-27-2012, 11:46 AM
the winds were over 50 mph and the fire jumped the slury drops the c-130's and other bombers had been laying down all after noon. The only thing that will help fight this fire is the weather. :(

I checked the weather for that area and it doesn't look like there is any help within the next 10 days. Hopefully that changes...a good rain would be huge for you guys...

Cito Pelon
06-27-2012, 12:11 PM
I don't think there's much hope for containment on Waldo for the next week. They might be able to save structures for the most part hopefully. It just doesn't look too good. Steep terrain, thick dry forest further north into the Pike natl forest along Rampart Range. As well as bone dry grasses of course. It's so dang dry. Plum Creek is dry already and that usually runs year round. Poor snowpack from winter, heck this is the first year I remember where they didn't run any water down the Highline Canal the snowpack was so bad.

Garcia Bronco
06-27-2012, 12:15 PM
I don't think there's much hope for containment on Waldo for the next week. They might be able to save structures for the most part hopefully. It just doesn't look too good. Steep terrain, thick dry forest further north into the Pike natl forest along Rampart Range. As well as bone dry grasses of course. It's so dang dry. Plum Creek is dry already and that usually runs year round. Poor snowpack from winter, heck this is the first year I remember where they didn't run any water down the Highline Canal the snowpack was so bad.

The lack of moisture is certainly a factor, but the biggest issue is putting loggers OOB and not allowing the existing ones to go up there and cut beetle trees and clearing the dead wood. There's too much fuel out there.

Cito Pelon
06-27-2012, 12:38 PM
The lack of moisture is certainly a factor, but the biggest issue is putting loggers OOB and not allowing the existing ones to go up there and cut beetle trees and clearing the dead wood. There's too much fuel out there.

Loggers have absolutely no interest in culling beetle kill trees. It's not feasible economically.

Fedaykin
06-27-2012, 12:40 PM
I checked the weather for that area and it doesn't look like there is any help within the next 10 days. Hopefully that changes...a good rain would be huge for you guys...

Ironically there's also a flash flood/mudslide warning in the areas where the fire has stripped all the vegetation off of hills.

And the likelihood of helpful rain is remote. Gentle rain showers don't often occur in the Colorado foothills in the summer -- it's predominately violent thunderstorms with high winds.

chickennob2
06-27-2012, 12:49 PM
The Broncos should try to swing a trade for Pacman Jones. We need somebody who can make it rain in Colorado.

Beantown Bronco
06-27-2012, 12:53 PM
The Broncos should try to swing a trade for Pacman Jones. We need somebody who can make it rain in Colorado.

Javon Walker is available.

Mountain Bronco
06-27-2012, 01:11 PM
The lack of moisture is certainly a factor, but the biggest issue is putting loggers OOB and not allowing the existing ones to go up there and cut beetle trees and clearing the dead wood. There's too much fuel out there.

Humidity levels where I am at in Southwestern Colorado are below 3%. 3freaking%. I don't know about the Springs, but I am sure it is similar. That is a far bigger factor than beetle trees and dead wood. Fires are starting and healthy vegetation is going up in a second with even the lightest spark of flame. I am all for logging, clearing etc... but the conditions of mother nature are causing this fire season PERIOD

My best wishes for everyone in harms way.

Ray Finkle
06-27-2012, 01:11 PM
the winds were over 50 mph and the fire jumped the slury drops the c-130's and other bombers had been laying down all after noon. The only thing that will help fight this fire is the weather. :(

stay safe!

Tombstone RJ
06-27-2012, 01:17 PM
Wow, that pic of the AFA stadium and the fire behind it... that is just too close for comfort.

Cmac821
06-27-2012, 01:30 PM
That fire is so close to city. Seems like the whole state is going down in flames pretty soon

broncocalijohn
06-27-2012, 02:43 PM
Ironically there's also a flash flood/mudslide warning in the areas where the fire has stripped all the vegetation off of hills.

And the likelihood of helpful rain is remote. Gentle rain showers don't often occur in the Colorado foothills in the summer -- it's predominately violent thunderstorms with high winds.

Wait until it rains in the Fall/Winter. That happens here in SoCal all the time. When there is a wildfire, expect the mudslides months later.

Garcia Bronco
06-27-2012, 02:52 PM
It's rained down south...maybe not south enough...but it rained.

Garcia Bronco
06-27-2012, 02:53 PM
Loggers have absolutely no interest in culling beetle kill trees. It's not feasible economically.

They'll take money to do it.

Cito Pelon
06-27-2012, 02:54 PM
Well, it's raining pretty good here by Chatfield, but windy of course. Temp dropped to 73 degrees. I hear thunder, so hopefully those lighting strikes don't start something new.

24champ
06-27-2012, 02:57 PM
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/562773_10151656523165288_1238762747_n.jpg

Cito Pelon
06-27-2012, 02:58 PM
They'll take money to do it.

Yeah, have to be taxpayer subsidized.

Cito Pelon
06-27-2012, 03:04 PM
Hopefully this rain drenched the Rampart Range. Temp down to 63 degrees now but the rain is over. The rain doesn't sustain for long with these monsoon conditions. The wind sustains longer.

bronco militia
06-27-2012, 03:09 PM
Wait until it rains in the Fall/Winter. That happens here in SoCal all the time. When there is a wildfire, expect the mudslides months later.

we don't get much rain after September...hopefully we get the snow.

Cito Pelon
06-27-2012, 03:29 PM
Lot of thunder and wind, not much rain.

Garcia Bronco
06-27-2012, 03:30 PM
Yeah, have to be taxpayer subsidized.

I haven't run the numbers, but I'd imagine in various hot zones....it would be cheaper than fighting a massive fire.

bronco militia
06-27-2012, 03:33 PM
we have 50 mph winds in town from a dry thunder storm...things might be getting interesting again :(

http://www.kktv.com/video/live

Fedaykin
06-27-2012, 04:59 PM
we have 50 mph winds in town from a dry thunder storm...things might be getting interesting again :(

http://www.kktv.com/video/live

Ugh, what's the prevailing vector?

Taco John
06-27-2012, 05:24 PM
http://sphotos.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/562773_10151656523165288_1238762747_n.jpg

Wow! That's quite the photo...

UberBroncoMan
06-27-2012, 05:48 PM
Man this sucks...

hookemhess
06-27-2012, 06:35 PM
Wow! That's quite the photo...

Reminds me of this photo from the fires here around Austin last year.

http://blackjackoak.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/savinghorses.jpg?w=640&h=480

KipCorrington25
06-27-2012, 06:47 PM
But hey on Chiefs Planet they are hoping Sports Authority Field burns down so at least those inbred meth heads are enjoying this.

orangeatheist
06-27-2012, 07:07 PM
But hey on Chiefs Planet they are hoping Sports Authority Field burns down so at least those inbred meth heads are enjoying this.

Just one more reason to hate those fans.

To everyone affected by the fire, my thoughts are with you. Please stay safe. My heart just breaks.

broncocalijohn
06-27-2012, 07:48 PM
But hey on Chiefs Planet they are hoping Sports Authority Field burns down so at least those inbred meth heads are enjoying this.

Why would any fan, rival or even a Chiefs fan, go to that website? Those are the most classless fans I have heard about on the internet.

While you are there, ask them why so? Would they rather have their team play at Air Force (if still there), CSU or Bolder for the away game? Is it because of the lack of wins for them? I would really wonder what possible answer they would come up with that would be reasonable.

Gutless Drunk
06-27-2012, 08:48 PM
Broncos pledge $50,000 for wildfire relief

Tens of thousands of people have been forced out of their homes as wildfires continue to burn in Colorado, and the Denver Broncos are among those lending a hand: The team has announced that it will donate $50,000 to assist in relief efforts.

“On behalf of the Denver Broncos, I extend our deepest sympathies to those who have been affected by the devastating fires throughout Colorado and the region,” owner Pat Bowlen said in a statement. “In particular, my thoughts are with those who have lost their homes or live in the evacuation areas. I also would like to commend the dedication of the firefighters, medical personnel, volunteers and the numerous organizations that are working around the clock to respond to these tragedies. Their contributions are heroic, selfless and truly immeasurable. This is our home, and we need to do whatever we can to take care of our neighbors. If at all possible, I encourage our fans to help however they can in providing relief during this time of need.”

Broncos defensive linemen Ben Garland, Mitch Unrein and Kevin Vickerson have all volunteered to visit with people who have been evacuated and with the firefighters who have been working in the state.

Others who would like to help are urged to visit HelpColoradoNow.org.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/06/27/broncos-pledge-50000-for-wildfire-relief/

broncosteven
06-27-2012, 09:03 PM
Hope everyone is safe and back in their homes soon.

I talked to my friend who I get my Bronco tix when I go out to home games and he had to be hospitalized for smoke inhalation but he has bad lung issues to begin with.

Stay Safe!

txtebow
06-27-2012, 09:20 PM
Best wishes to all of those suffering through this horrible time. The pictures absolutely are horrifying and really capture the essence of this dire situation for us afar much better than any article.

Fedaykin
06-27-2012, 09:22 PM
But hey on Chiefs Planet they are hoping Sports Authority Field burns down so at least those inbred meth heads are enjoying this.


Yet another example of why I occasionally wish I was black hat...

broncocalijohn
06-27-2012, 09:59 PM
Hope everyone is safe and back in their homes soon.

I talked to my friend who I get my Bronco tix when I go out to home games and he had to be hospitalized for smoke inhalation but he has bad lung issues to begin with.

Stay Safe!

Found out today a former Boy Scout from my troop lost his house in Colorado Springs.

RMT
06-27-2012, 10:06 PM
Just saw this on DPO for those of us in the metro Denver area who wish to donate items. Get the word out!!

Cash, fresh batteries, water jugs, Gatorade, Vitamin Water, diapers, hand sanitizer, personal care products, boxed meals, cereal and #10 cans of fruits, vegetables will be collected at Comedy Works South, 5345 Landmark Place, Greenwood Village on Saturday, June 30, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Everything goes to Care and Share Colorado, a food bank in Colorado Springs for victims of Waldo Canyon Fire.

Read more: How to assist Colorado wildfire victims, how to donate and help - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_20935254#ixzz1z3cPHeMB
Read The Denver Post's Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse

Broncoman13
06-28-2012, 08:05 PM
No more updates? I heard on the radio this afternoon that there were 346 homes destroyed. I think several of those homes were million dollar (or more) homes. Sad and crazy.

Stuck in Cali
06-28-2012, 08:05 PM
Wife just got off the phone with her aunt that lives in Colorado Springs. Looks like their childhood home got burned down, but all the current family's homes are ok for now. Very sad to hear Manatu springs (sp) has been hit by it, love that part of town, and I guess The Garden of the Gods got hit as well, and that sucks.

I hope they get this under control soon. Hope everyones family and friends are doing ok. Best wishes to all of you effected by this.

Take care.

broncocalijohn
06-28-2012, 11:34 PM
Found out today a former Boy Scout from my troop lost his house in Colorado Springs.

Well, he has now been interviewed by CNN. Totally sucks!

http://www.cnn.com/video/?/video/bestoftv/2012/06/28/tsr-pkg-spellman-co-family-wildfire.cnn#/video/bestoftv/2012/06/28/tsr-pkg-spellman-co-family-wildfire.cnn

bronco militia
07-02-2012, 12:05 PM
C-130 firefighting plane that crashed from NC
July 02, 2012 11:00 AM
ShareThis| Print Story | E-Mail StoryNEWS SERVICES
A military cargo plane from North Carolina has crashed while fighting a wildfire in South Dakota, but there's no official word on death or injuries.

The North Carolina Air National Guard says six crew members were aboard. The C-130 is part of the 145th Airlift Wing in Charlotte, N.C.

Military officials say the plane crashed after dropping fire retardant Sunday in the Black Hills.

South Dakota officials tell the Rapid City Journal (http://tinyurl.com/86dpvvc) three crew members were taken to a hospital. Military officials won't comment.

Eight C-130s can be equipped to drop water or fire retardant. In addition to the Charlotte unit, they're flown by National Guard and Reserve units in Colorado, California and Wyoming.

The C-130 was working to slow the White Draw fire in southwestern South Dakota, she said. The Associated Press reported that the tanker made at least two drops of fire retardant material on the White Draw fire on Sunday before crashing at about 6 p.m.

The C-130 units based outside of Colorado include the Wyoming Air National Guard’s 153nd Airlift Wing, the California Air National Guard’s 146th Airlift Wing and the North Carolina Air National Guard’s 145th Airlift Wing.

The Defense Department's entire fleet of C-130 aircraft was mobilized and sent to Peterson Air Force Base last week after fires erupted across the western United States. It was the first time since 2008 that all eight planes were placed into service at the same time, according to the Air Force.

The C-130s can drop up to 3,000 gallons of retardant at a time, leaving a trail of slurry spanning a quarter-mile by 100 feet. The planes fly low and slow for each drop, descending to about 150 feet above the ground while spraying the thick orange mist.

Each plane typically boasts a crew of six.

There are 10 such crews - totalling 60 airmen - trained to fly firefighting missions with the 302nd Airlift Wing



Read more: http://www.gazette.com/articles/fire-141092-dakota-officials.html#ixzz1zUQ7YWl4

Irish Stout
07-02-2012, 12:49 PM
I've heard they have 100% containment now on the High Park Fire. I haven't heard anything lately about containment on the Waldo Canyon fire. Anyone have news?

maher_tyler
07-02-2012, 12:50 PM
C-130 firefighting plane that crashed from NC
July 02, 2012 11:00 AM
ShareThis| Print Story | E-Mail StoryNEWS SERVICES
A military cargo plane from North Carolina has crashed while fighting a wildfire in South Dakota, but there's no official word on death or injuries.

The North Carolina Air National Guard says six crew members were aboard. The C-130 is part of the 145th Airlift Wing in Charlotte, N.C.

Military officials say the plane crashed after dropping fire retardant Sunday in the Black Hills.

South Dakota officials tell the Rapid City Journal (http://tinyurl.com/86dpvvc) three crew members were taken to a hospital. Military officials won't comment.

Eight C-130s can be equipped to drop water or fire retardant. In addition to the Charlotte unit, they're flown by National Guard and Reserve units in Colorado, California and Wyoming.

The C-130 was working to slow the White Draw fire in southwestern South Dakota, she said. The Associated Press reported that the tanker made at least two drops of fire retardant material on the White Draw fire on Sunday before crashing at about 6 p.m.

The C-130 units based outside of Colorado include the Wyoming Air National Guard’s 153nd Airlift Wing, the California Air National Guard’s 146th Airlift Wing and the North Carolina Air National Guard’s 145th Airlift Wing.

The Defense Department's entire fleet of C-130 aircraft was mobilized and sent to Peterson Air Force Base last week after fires erupted across the western United States. It was the first time since 2008 that all eight planes were placed into service at the same time, according to the Air Force.

The C-130s can drop up to 3,000 gallons of retardant at a time, leaving a trail of slurry spanning a quarter-mile by 100 feet. The planes fly low and slow for each drop, descending to about 150 feet above the ground while spraying the thick orange mist.

Each plane typically boasts a crew of six.

There are 10 such crews - totalling 60 airmen - trained to fly firefighting missions with the 302nd Airlift Wing



Read more: http://www.gazette.com/articles/fire-141092-dakota-officials.html#ixzz1zUQ7YWl4

That is terrible...hope it starts raining soon or it could be a very long summer! My prayers are with those involved!

bronco militia
07-02-2012, 01:01 PM
Colorado wildfire: Family of Broncos' Ben Garland loses home to Waldo Canyon Fire


Read more: Colorado wildfire: Family of Broncos' Ben Garland loses home to Waldo Canyon Fire - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/broncos/ci_20973863/colorado-wildfire-family-bronco-ben-garland-loses-home#ixzz1zUeNY8TC
Read The Denver Post's Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse

Cito Pelon
07-02-2012, 02:36 PM
I've heard they have 100% containment now on the High Park Fire. I haven't heard anything lately about containment on the Waldo Canyon fire. Anyone have news?

Here's the link: http://inciweb.org/state/6/

Waldo is still spreading to the north I believe, the containment is all on the south, east, west. Weather conditions aren't as bad as last week.

bronco militia
07-02-2012, 02:42 PM
http://images.onset.freedom.com/colgazette/gallery/m6jq3y-070312mainmap.jpg

the Mountain Shadows area was the only part of town to lose structures. Manitou was evacuated for a few days.