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Bronco_Beerslug
05-03-2012, 03:18 PM
My son played 3 years in HS and I never really though about him getting seriously hurt during those years although he did suffer a lower back injury that bothers him from time to time today.

In light of Kurt Warner's statement that he prefer his sons do not play the game, I was wondering what the sentiment here was.

There is no doubt that football players are getting so much bigger, stronger and faster at a younger and younger age that there is a real question about how dangerous the game is becoming/has become.


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Kurt Warner would prefer his sons not play football (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/05/03/kurt-warner-would-prefer-his-sons-not-play-football/)
Michael David Smith on May 3, 2012, 10:14 AM EDT

Yesterday’s two big stories in the NFL, the suspensions of four Saints for their roles in the team’s bounty program and the suicide of Junior Seau, have one future Hall of Famer wondering if playing football is worth it.

http://nbcprofootballtalk.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/kurtwarner6ifntrkl2dtm.jpg?w=250

Kurt Warner said on the Dan Patrick Show that the idea of his sons playing football “scares me,” and he thinks the risk of injuries is serious enough that his preference would be that his boys not play.

“They both have the dream, like dad, to play in the NFL,” Warner said. “That’s their goal. And when you hear things like the bounties, when you know certain things having played the game, and then obviously when you understand the size, the speed, the violence of the game, and then you couple that with situations like Junior Seau — was that a ramification of all the years playing? And things that go with that. It scares me as a dad. I just wonder — I wonder what the league’s going to be like. I love that the commissioner is doing a lot of things to try to clean up the game from that standpoint and improve player safety, which helps, in my mind, a lot. But it’s a scary thing for me.”

Asked if he would prefer that his sons not play football, Warner answered, “Yes, I would. Can’t make that choice for them if they want to, but there’s no question in my mind.”

If a man who loves football as much as Warner does would prefer his sons not play, there are probably millions of Americans thinking the same thing. This is a serious problem facing the game of football.

baja
05-03-2012, 03:20 PM
no, I wouldn't want him to be a gladiator either

jhat01
05-03-2012, 03:25 PM
I have a 3 year old boy, and up until now I was all for it (if we wants to). This stuff with the CTE and concussions does make me think though. I'll still probably let him play, but I might try to steer him towards baseball.

cmhargrove
05-03-2012, 03:33 PM
Sure the rules change when you become the parent - you worry about your kids all the time. But, what you gonna do - teach them to be nancies that are afraid to get hurt?

You can get hurt doing anything these days. I know as many kids that tear their ACL playing soccer and basketball - its not just football. The equipment just gets better and better, and several brands of helmets are actually hooked into computers to measure concussive forces.

Bottom line is, if your son is an athlete, why would you want to hold him back from reaching his potential in any sport? I don't care if it is badminton, bowling, track, or wrestling. To teach any less is a poor example for a father to teach, IMO. Teach your kid to love what he is doing, try to be his absolute best, and do everything in his power to be the fastest, biggest, strongest, and most skilled. There is a life lesson there that lasts long after their playing career.

I'll take a bum knee at age 50 rather than being a fat ass diabetic anyday. As my great grandmother used to say (she lived to over 110 years old) - "It's better to wear out than to rust out."

snowspot66
05-03-2012, 03:35 PM
I don't see youth leagues as much of an issue. Even in most high school programs the kids aren't big enough or fast enough to be at a serious risk for injury. I got completely leveled by blind side cheap shots a couple of times and no headache, dizziness, or anything. Hell I was on my feet faster than the kid that hit me. It was like when Dumervil leveled Brady. He just popped right back up as if it didn't happen.

When you start getting into college that's when I might have problems. Not worth it unless you're getting a free ride in my opinion.

manchambo
05-03-2012, 03:41 PM
It's a tough question to answer. Certainly something I enjoyed thoroughly for several years. I tend to think the dangers of playing into high school are less than playing in the NFL, but it's hard to be sure. And what if they did turn out good enough to play in college or the NFL? I'm not sure the cost is worth it at this point, but I don't know how you could convince them not to do it (no one could have convinced me).

CPA
05-03-2012, 03:45 PM
I had two sons play, both from the age 4 through 6th grade in a local youth league. I don't regret it.

I also served in various positions in that league including two years as the President. The league works closely with it's hired EMS squad and has worked in conjunction with USA Football (the NFL's youth arm), the league's insurance company and local doctors to put together procedures to help reduce injury, as well as dealing with inevitable injuries. The one thing the league can't do is insure that 100% of kids that sustain a concussion don't play, because, well, parents aren't always honest. For those that the league knows have had concussions, a release from the doctor is now required.

The league is doing something right because it's one of the largest non-affiliated, non-select team leagues in the state of Texas with over 1700 players.

Bronco_Beerslug
05-03-2012, 03:45 PM
I don't see youth leagues as much of an issue. Even in most high school programs the kids aren't big enough or fast enough to be at a serious risk for injury. I got completely leveled by blind side cheap shots a couple of times and no headache, dizziness, or anything. Hell I was on my feet faster than the kid that hit me. It was like when Dumervil leveled Brady. He just popped right back up as if it didn't happen.

When you start getting into college that's when I might have problems. Not worth it unless you're getting a free ride in my opinion.

I don't know about that after reading some of the stuff below..

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
'Catastrophic' Head Injuries to High School Football Players Rising (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_124327.html)
Annual report found fewer deaths but more cases of permanent brain damage
URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_124327.html (*this news item will not be available after 07/19/2012)

Friday, April 20, 2012

FRIDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- High school and youth football players sustained 14 brain injuries with long-lasting damage in 2011 -- the highest number in more than 25 years -- and this is a "major problem," a new report claims.

The finding is based on an annual survey, conducted by the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, which collects data on catastrophic football injuries.

Although deaths from brain injuries among high school players have decreased every decade, from 128 in the 1960s to 32 in the 2000s, brain injuries with incomplete recovery reached the double digits in three of the past four years.

CONT...

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
High School, College Football Comes With Risk (http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Healthday/story?id=4508074&page=1)
By Jeffrey Perkel

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- With the school football season just around the corner, a new study is raising awareness of the risks associated with playing the game.

Researchers found that college football players get injured more often than their high school counterparts, but high school athletes are more likely to end up severely injured.

The new findings also point to "where the focus should be in terms of prevention," said Dr. Cynthia LaBella, medical director of the Institute for Sports Medicine at Children's Memorial Hospital, in Chicago. She was not involved in the study, which is published in the August issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

A second report on youth sports injuries was also released Thursday, this time by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That study, published in this week's issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, found that boys aged 10 to 14 were most likely to end up in the nation's emergency departments with a traumatic brain injury, and that activities such as bicycling, horseback riding, football, basketball and use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) were most often to blame.

The football study was led by R. Dawn Comstock, a primary investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Her team collected injury reports for the 2005-2006 football season from 100 high schools and 55 colleges across the country via two Internet-based systems -- the High School Reporting Information Online (RIO) and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System, respectively.

Based on almost 1,900 injury reports submitted to the RIO, the researchers estimate there were 517,726 football-related injuries during the 2005-2006 season at the high school level across the United States. The NCAA system logged more than 3,500 injuries in its database during the same period.

Not unexpectedly, college players were about twice as likely to injure themselves as high school students, Comstock said, suffering 8.6 injuries per 1,000 "athlete-exposures" (a practice or competition), compared with high school athletes' 4.36 injuries/1,000.

But the researcher said she was surprised to find that the distribution of injuries differed, with fractures, concussions, and season-ending injuries more common among high school athletes.

CONT...

Requiem
05-03-2012, 03:46 PM
If I ever have a son, I will support him in whatever sporting endeavor he chooses. Even male cheerleading. WOO.

Dr. Broncenstein
05-03-2012, 03:48 PM
I'd rather he want to play golf. But if he really wants to play football, his mother is going to be the hurdle.

OBF1
05-03-2012, 03:48 PM
Easy for the white guys to say yes... Like they will ever have a chance of going professional Hilarious!

oubronco
05-03-2012, 03:50 PM
I'd really like for my son to get a scholarship for College Bass Fishing

TerrElway
05-03-2012, 03:50 PM
Interesting discussion in the 3 o'clock hour on KFAN in SLC- Vai Sikahema (former player now broadcaster in Philly) talking football.

Talk turned to the head injuries and the suicides and injuries etc. and the host made the comment that he never thought he would do this but he and his wife have actually talked about whether their kid should play FB.

I have to say, I have had some of the same thoughts lately.

I LOVE football. It's my favorite sport and to be honest, some of the appeal is the physicality and violence of the game. I love the strategy as well but I love the toughness and grit it takes to play the game. I played and played through injury (20 years ago it was "rub dirt on it and get back in there") and later was told by a Dr. that the stingers I kept getting were really close to screwing me up good for life. And that was just at the HS varsity level. I can barely imagine playing at the collegiate or pro level.

I coach youth ball now and have to the last 7 years (10 years total). This is my last year coaching as my son is going into the 9th grade and this is the last year he can play WFFL. I see so many cavemen coaching the kids and not caring about injury and celebrating injury etc. etc. that it has sullied the game for me some. I don't think there is any place for it with young kids. Not purposefully trying to hurt but it is rampant and it is done in the name of toughness and winning. That said, you have to play the game with an edge and we try to coach that and bring that out.

But with all the new info on the head injuries and everything else I found myself saying to my wife just last night,"If Nick said he didn't want to play HS ball I probably wouldn't try to change his mind." I never thought I would say that about my favorite sport but my kid's health is of more concern to me than trying to recapture old glory through his exploits on the field.

Do I need to get my testosterone level checked?

Kaylore
05-03-2012, 03:52 PM
If I had a son and they wanted to play football, then I would want them to. I don't "want" them to do anything just because.

lolcopter
05-03-2012, 03:53 PM
If they want to...

Bronco Boy
05-03-2012, 03:56 PM
If I had a son and he wanted to do activities that could cause him brain damage like football and drugs then I would let him.

TheReverend
05-03-2012, 04:01 PM
Shiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit I even want my daughter to play.

She's super tiny and petite but I could teach her to play safe AND wreck mofos playing safety.

Drunk Monkey
05-03-2012, 04:03 PM
Sure the rules change when you become the parent - you worry about your kids all the time. But, what you gonna do - teach them to be nancies that are afraid to get hurt?

You can get hurt doing anything these days. I know as many kids that tear their ACL playing soccer and basketball - its not just football. The equipment just gets better and better, and several brands of helmets are actually hooked into computers to measure concussive forces.

Bottom line is, if your son is an athlete, why would you want to hold him back from reaching his potential in any sport? I don't care if it is badminton, bowling, track, or wrestling. To teach any less is a poor example for a father to teach, IMO. Teach your kid to love what he is doing, try to be his absolute best, and do everything in his power to be the fastest, biggest, strongest, and most skilled. There is a life lesson there that lasts long after their playing career.

I'll take a bum knee at age 50 rather than being a fat ass diabetic anyday. As my great grandmother used to say (she lived to over 110 years old) - "It's better to wear out than to rust out."

I have a bum knee at 33 from Football. It sucks.

razorwire77
05-03-2012, 04:05 PM
Honestly, it depends on what he wanted to do. If my hypothetical son had a passion for the game and wanted to play in high school I would allow him to do it, assuming his other priorities like school were in check. It would also depend on my son's size and strength. I played 4 years of high school football primary LB/DE at a 4A school and started for three of those years. The only injuries I incurred was one mild concussion, a slightly sprained ankle and a broken pinky. However, I was 6'2" 225 pounds. If my son turns out to be 5'6" and a buck 40, I would be much more hesitant to let him play than if he turns out to be my size.

Ratboy
05-03-2012, 04:10 PM
I will push him into all sports early on and let him make his decision as he gets older.

Drunk Monkey
05-03-2012, 04:17 PM
At this point I don't think I would influence him to play football but I would not stand in his way either if he wanted to. If he made that choice I would be as enthusiastic a parent / fan as I could be. Since I love the game I don't think I would have to try very hard.

manchambo
05-03-2012, 04:20 PM
If I had a son and they wanted to play football, then I would want them to. I don't "want" them to do anything just because.

Do you "want" your son not to have head injuries? I think that was the point of the question. And not wanting your son to play football for that reason is not really "just because."

Blart
05-03-2012, 04:24 PM
This is how boxing faded away into niche status.

Parents didn't want their sons playing, highschool boxing classes were cancelled from low attendance, and a new generation was born that had no interest in the sport.

The concussion studies were the beginning of the end for football.

Requiem
05-03-2012, 04:25 PM
Do you "want" your son not to have head injuries? I think that was the point of the question. And not wanting your son to play football for that reason is not really "just because."

A kid can sustain a serious head injury by pretending to play Ninja Turtles on the monkey bars and jungle gym's at school playgrounds. Lets get real naw.

DBroncos4life
05-03-2012, 04:26 PM
The odds of my son making it to the NFL might be getting better. :P

Drunken.Broncoholic
05-03-2012, 04:29 PM
If I had a son I'd let him decide what he wants to play or not play.

Requiem
05-03-2012, 04:29 PM
If I had a son I'd let him decide what he wants to play or not play.

Want to adopt one with me?

snowspot66
05-03-2012, 04:30 PM
I don't know about that after reading some of the stuff below..

Friday, April 20, 2012

FRIDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- High school and youth football players sustained 14 brain injuries with long-lasting damage in 2011 -- the highest number in more than 25 years -- and this is a "major problem," a new report claims.


I don't know. Fourteen is obviously fourteen too many but considering how many kids play youth and high school football it seems like the article is trying to make an issue where one doesn't really exist. You can only limit risk so much and if you do limit it what's left? Even "non violent" games like basketball produce a large number of injuries and even traumatic brain injures. Other than a national obsession with curling I don't see any way to avoid it.

razorwire77
05-03-2012, 04:30 PM
Do you "want" your son not to have head injuries? I think that was the point of the question. And not wanting your son to play football for that reason is not really "just because."

Unless you're playing 5A or 6A ball in Texas, Ohio, or Florida though football at a high school level and a DI level are completely different. The speed and strength of the players at the high college and NFL level make it almost another game. I personally don't know anybody that played high school football that has residual injuries as the result of head injuries. Bad knees and shoulders? Sure, a few. Crocked fingers, yeah. Head injuries that result in severe depression and contribute to mental health issues? No.

Now if you play 4 years of high school, are good enough to play for Alabama, and then you play 3 years there, and you are good to get drafted, and you play in the NFL for 12 years with 280 pound guys that run 4.79 40's and bench press 480 pounds slamming into you, that's a different story. But how many of us are going to have kids like that? Kupe's dad and maybe one other poster?

Drunken.Broncoholic
05-03-2012, 04:31 PM
Pretty soon we will see kids running around with full body protective bubbles. Layers and layers of Nerf covering their entire bodies.

I'm glad I grew up when we were allowed to grow up.

BroncoBeavis
05-03-2012, 04:34 PM
I'd rather he want to play golf. But if he really wants to play football, his mother is going to be the hurdle.

When I first read that I thought you said "in the huddle"

And to that, with my wife, I can totally relate. :)

Ronnie Tsunami
05-03-2012, 04:39 PM
I don't know. I'm not a dad yet, so I can't really say what it would feel like to have my own spawn being put at that big a risk. I might get defensive, I might not.

razorwire77
05-03-2012, 04:41 PM
Pretty soon we will see kids running around with full body protective bubbles. Layers and layers of Nerf covering their entire bodies.

I'm glad I grew up when we were allowed to grow up.

No ****. Get busted drinking too many beers at a party and a kid has to go to alcoholics counseling. Get into a fist fight and it's aggravated assault and the fight gets posted on YouTube. Pretty soon it's you want to play football and have to become a bubble boy. Wouldn't want to be a 17-year-old in 2019.

snowspot66
05-03-2012, 04:42 PM
Here's an actual study on high school mild traumatic brain injuries.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/282/10/958.short

Results Of 23,566 reported injuries in the 10 sports during the 3-year study period, 1219 (5.5%) were MTBIs. Of the MTBIs, football accounted for 773 (63.4%) of cases; wrestling, 128 (10.5%); girls' soccer, 76 (6.2%); boys' soccer, 69 (5.7%); girls' basketball, 63 (5.2%); boys' basketball, 51 (4.2%); softball, 25 (2.1%); baseball, 15 (1.2%); field hockey, 13 (1.1%); and volleyball, 6 (0.5%). The injury rates per 100 player-seasons were 3.66 for football, 1.58 for wrestling, 1.14 for girls' soccer, 1.04 for girls' basketball, 0.92 for boys' soccer, 0.75 for boys' basketball, 0.46 for softball, 0.46 for field hockey, 0.23 for baseball, and 0.14 for volleyball. The median time lost from participation for all MTBIs was 3 days. There were 6 cases of subdural hematoma and intracranial injury reported in football. Based on these data, an estimated 62,816 cases of MTBI occur annually among high school varsity athletes participating in these sports, with football accounting for about 63% of cases.

Football by far was responsible for the majority of the cases but it's also a game with at least 6 and usually 11 on each side. Wrestling is next in line and that would be far more worrying to me as that's 1v1 and has a significantly smaller number of kids who even participate. What really surprises me is that boys and girls soccer follows in at spots three and four. I have to assume the team sizes account for the number of injuries but it has to be one of the lowest contact activities out of the major sports available to most kids. There really isn't a completely safe sport other than maybe track. Maybe.

manchambo
05-03-2012, 04:45 PM
Unless you're playing 5A or 6A ball in Texas, Ohio, or Florida though football at a high school level and a DI level are completely different. The speed and strength of the players at the high college and NFL level make it almost another game. I personally don't know anybody that played high school football that has residual injuries as the result of head injuries. Bad knees and shoulders? Sure, a few. Crocked fingers, yeah. Head injuries that result in severe depression and contribute to mental health issues? No.

Now if you play 4 years of high school, are good enough to play for Alabama, and then you play 3 years there, and you are good to get drafted, and you play in the NFL for 12 years with 280 pound guys that run 4.79 40's and bench press 480 pounds slamming into you, that's a different story. But how many of us are going to have kids like that? Kupe's dad and maybe one other poster?

I don't know if anyone knows the answer to whether high school football leads to long term brain problems. I played, had a few concussions, and have had problems with depression. Are they related? I have no idea. If I had a son I'd have a hard time living with that doubt.

manchambo
05-03-2012, 04:48 PM
Here's an actual study on high school mild traumatic brain injuries.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/282/10/958.short



Football by far was responsible for the majority of the cases but it's also a game with at least 6 and usually 11 on each side. Wrestling is next in line and that would be far more worrying to me as that's 1v1 and has a significantly smaller number of kids who even participate. What really surprises me is that boys and girls soccer follows in at spots three and four. I have to assume the team sizes account for the number of injuries but it has to be one of the lowest contact activities out of the major sports available to most kids. There really isn't a completely safe sport other than maybe track. Maybe.

From what I understand, there's increasing concern about sub-clinical brain injuries. People may not get concussions, but linemen, for example, have collisions on every single play that may be leading to long term problems. And that is pretty much limited to football.

manchambo
05-03-2012, 04:52 PM
I don't know about that after reading some of the stuff below..

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
'Catastrophic' Head Injuries to High School Football Players Rising (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_124327.html)
Annual report found fewer deaths but more cases of permanent brain damage
URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_124327.html (*this news item will not be available after 07/19/2012)

Friday, April 20, 2012

FRIDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- High school and youth football players sustained 14 brain injuries with long-lasting damage in 2011 -- the highest number in more than 25 years -- and this is a "major problem," a new report claims.

The finding is based on an annual survey, conducted by the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, which collects data on catastrophic football injuries.

Although deaths from brain injuries among high school players have decreased every decade, from 128 in the 1960s to 32 in the 2000s, brain injuries with incomplete recovery reached the double digits in three of the past four years.

CONT...

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
High School, College Football Comes With Risk (http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Healthday/story?id=4508074&page=1)
By Jeffrey Perkel

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- With the school football season just around the corner, a new study is raising awareness of the risks associated with playing the game.

Researchers found that college football players get injured more often than their high school counterparts, but high school athletes are more likely to end up severely injured.

The new findings also point to "where the focus should be in terms of prevention," said Dr. Cynthia LaBella, medical director of the Institute for Sports Medicine at Children's Memorial Hospital, in Chicago. She was not involved in the study, which is published in the August issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

A second report on youth sports injuries was also released Thursday, this time by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That study, published in this week's issue of Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, found that boys aged 10 to 14 were most likely to end up in the nation's emergency departments with a traumatic brain injury, and that activities such as bicycling, horseback riding, football, basketball and use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) were most often to blame.

The football study was led by R. Dawn Comstock, a primary investigator at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Her team collected injury reports for the 2005-2006 football season from 100 high schools and 55 colleges across the country via two Internet-based systems -- the High School Reporting Information Online (RIO) and National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System, respectively.

Based on almost 1,900 injury reports submitted to the RIO, the researchers estimate there were 517,726 football-related injuries during the 2005-2006 season at the high school level across the United States. The NCAA system logged more than 3,500 injuries in its database during the same period.

Not unexpectedly, college players were about twice as likely to injure themselves as high school students, Comstock said, suffering 8.6 injuries per 1,000 "athlete-exposures" (a practice or competition), compared with high school athletes' 4.36 injuries/1,000.

But the researcher said she was surprised to find that the distribution of injuries differed, with fractures, concussions, and season-ending injuries more common among high school athletes.

CONT...

That is amazing--more than ten deaths per year in high school football in the 60s. How did people ever find that acceptable?

BroncoBeavis
05-03-2012, 04:52 PM
I think deep down I'm more afraid of teaching my sons to live afraid than I am of them getting hurt.

Of course they're not old enough yet for me to be too legitimately worried about seriously getting hurt.

But at this phase in parenthood, I feel more afraid of them living with the regret of not trying what they wanted.

But I guess that's all about what they want to do when the time comes.

extralife
05-03-2012, 04:58 PM
No ****. Get busted drinking too many beers at a party and a kid has to go to alcoholics counseling. Get into a fist fight and it's aggravated assault and the fight gets posted on YouTube. Pretty soon it's you want to play football and have to become a bubble boy. Wouldn't want to be a 17-year-old in 2019.

and if it all produces less ****ing morons like you, I suppose we'll yet have a shot in this world.

Meck77
05-03-2012, 05:02 PM
I'd really like for my son to get a scholarship for College Bass Fishing

That would be sweet! Check this out OU! CSU is making waves!

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_20541904/colorado-states-bass-fishing-team-lands-1-500

Mogulseeker
05-03-2012, 05:13 PM
My kids will play an instrument and a team sport. Doesn't matter what, but they'll play.

I also want to get them on golf/ski lessons at a young age.

BroncoMan4ever
05-03-2012, 05:15 PM
I grew up in a sports oriented family, because of that I would love my kids to play. But I would never force them one way or the other

oubronco
05-03-2012, 05:18 PM
That would be sweet! Check this out OU! CSU is making waves!

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_20541904/colorado-states-bass-fishing-team-lands-1-500

That's sweet, if they would've had Bass fishing college when I was young I would've been a college grad for sure!!

manchambo
05-03-2012, 05:30 PM
My kids will play an instrument and a team sport. Doesn't matter what, but they'll play.

I also want to get them on golf/ski lessons at a young age.

If I could do it over I would definitely learn golf at a young age. I really wish I could play well now, and I think the best way to have an effortless game is to learn it when you're young. What do I have to show for football? Bad knees and bad back.

razorwire77
05-03-2012, 05:42 PM
and if it all produces less ****ing morons like you, I suppose we'll yet have a shot in this world.

Right, because you know all about my contributions to society and my background tough guy.

Archer81
05-03-2012, 06:05 PM
If sons ever come into the picture, and they wanted to I would let them play. Same with soccer or ballet or baseball. If it makes them happy, I'm for it.

:Broncos:

gunns
05-03-2012, 06:07 PM
My youngest played. He loves the game. He never had problems with any head problems but ended up blowing out his knee. I know he wouldn't change anything and neither would I. What I hated is the build up my son got. College scouts wanting him to sign with them and filling his head full of ****. It made the let down all the more worse when his knee wouldn't cooperate but he made the decision to go in another direction in college. It took a while for him to let it go but I think he knows it worked out very well.

Willynowei
05-03-2012, 06:13 PM
Highschool football, high level College football, and then the NFL are so far apart from other in terms of the bad things that can happen to the kids playing them.

As long as the kid doesn't go around spearing other kids, then baring a freak accident more rare than car accident, he's not going to get badly hurt. Breaking a bone is not going to mess up the rest of his life, if anything that's a good experience.

Warner's talking about the NFL, where everything is magnified x10.

I was an idiot in college, when i couldn't make a college team worth going to after highschool football... I played full contact pickup football with the bench guys from our football team with no pads on. I got knocked out by the backup runningback. He tried to stiff arm me and i went for a bullet like tackle, his elbow accidently hit my forehead full speed, i got knocked out instantly.

So after 4 years of football in Highschool, it was backyard football that knocked me out, and all my other injuries have occured in basketball going up for rebounds. I'm a full believer that football with pads on and played properly is as safe as any at the highschool level, unless you play in a state like texas or florida.

Football at the highschool level is a pretty safe sport, you need to learn properly tackling, proper technique, play with your body low and your eyes always up. That's it, i don't see it being a problem other than that.

I just will make damn sure my kid, when and if i have one, doesn't do what I did when out of pads.

Ronnie Tsunami
05-03-2012, 06:18 PM
there's a reason NFL's "Play 60" campaign is "get 60 minutes of physical activity a day" and not "play football 60 minutes a day."

The NFL knows what's up, and they know how hypocritical they'd be in asking for children to put themselves at that big a risk without improved safety measures.
http://static.nfl.com/static/content/public/image/play60/play60_03.jpg

TheFullTebow
05-03-2012, 06:22 PM
No ****. Get busted drinking too many beers at a party and a kid has to go to alcoholics counseling. Get into a fist fight and it's aggravated assault and the fight gets posted on YouTube. Pretty soon it's you want to play football and have to become a bubble boy. Wouldn't want to be a 17-year-old in 2019.
that's why i'm pushing my sons into hockey

broncosteven
05-03-2012, 06:51 PM
I think if my boy wanted to play I would let him but I would teach him about the signs for concussions and tell him to sit if he is hurt.

I have had a couple concussions doing normal things, **** happens doesn't mean you have to stop doing things you enjoy, just be smart about how you do them.

El Minion
05-03-2012, 07:11 PM
This is how boxing faded away into niche status.

Parents didn't want their sons playing, highschool boxing classes were cancelled from low attendance, and a new generation was born that had no interest in the sport.

The concussion studies were the beginning of the end for football.

I disagree, I think the monopoly that these two have and still have in the sport contributed to fan frustration because matches that fans want to see and are willing to pay for, are just not agreed by either King or Arum. (Floyd Mayweather v. Manny Pacquiao!?!?!) There is an alphabet soup of boxing organizations and no real authority or mechanism to automatically match up the best rank boxers in each division, which is another problem, let alone within each boxing Federation/Association/Organization. There are now ~18 weight classes, WTF?


http://www.hollywoodmurder.com/Pictures/Donking.jpg

http://www.examiner.com/images/blog/EXID10947/images/box_g_arum_300.jpg

loborugger
05-03-2012, 07:15 PM
I was a kid that wasn't allowed to play football as a child. I wanted to, and kept asking. I finally gave up in HS. I told myself that I would never let my fear stop my kid from playing a sport he wanted to play.

When I got to college, I played rugby. I got injured, torn an ACL and my kneecap went off to a place it shouldnt have gone. Sadly, it wasn't because of a hit, but instead because we were playing on a ****ty field and my cleat got caught on a pop up sprinkler.

Now, I am old, tired and fat. So, I coach my son's HS rugby team. His choice to play, but I am of course pleased he has chosen rugby.

This is what I would say. 1. My parent's attempt to control led to a lot of friction. It still disappoints me that they made that decision. 2. I got involved in a contact sport anyways once I was out from under their thumb. 3. The recovery from the ACL surgery was one of the hardest things I ever did - and I really grew as a person from it. 4. Bad luck can happen at any time. I could hurt myself playing soccer, rugby, football, or whatever on that field.

ColoradoDarin
05-03-2012, 07:45 PM
Do I want my son to play football? Not really. He's on the skinny side (I was 120 pounds when I graduated HS, 140 after college - put on my "freshman" 15 finally at 23)

Will I let him play if he wants to? Yes. I still resent the fact that my parents wouldn't sign the permission form back in Junior High. We were playing backyard full tackle anyways.

He'll be 4 next year - first year he can play soccer. So I do want him to start that (and probably t-ball too).

srphoenix
05-03-2012, 08:05 PM
The only way I'd be for a potential son playing football is if he had the athletic talent to have a high chance of a scholarship, otherwise not worth the risk when there are so many other sports with so much less risk available.

Jay3
05-03-2012, 08:27 PM
If he were a gifted athlete and it's what he loves, I would support it. But if it's just for fun in high school, and he's not particularly talented, then I'd prefer he didn't. It's a rough sport for big, fast guys.

I do believe the head trauma stuff can be managed by a smart player. The brain scans they can do now should be enough information to monitor your status and stay ahead of any problems.

Archer81
05-03-2012, 08:33 PM
Mt grandmother (dad's mom) wanted my brothers and I to do soccer. She viewed it as safer and more fun. So from 1st grade til 9th grade, I played soccer. And hated it. Even at 7 years old I hated running back and forth for an hour to get one goal. Maybe.

...Bleh.

:Broncos:

Dedhed
05-03-2012, 08:47 PM
Even in most high school programs the kids aren't big enough or fast enough to be at a serious risk for injury.

I disagree completely. I think High school is where head injuries are the scariest (and the absolutely happen frequently) because High School kids are at the height of peer pressure and want to be tough guys.

Add that to the fact that there is basically no medical staff on sight to tell a kid he's done for the day, and I think high school kids are far more likely to play with a head injuries because they were never diagnosed.

The serious damage is done if you get a secondary blow to an already injured brain. I think that's more likely to happen in high school than anywhere else.

StugotsIII
05-03-2012, 09:09 PM
no, I wouldn't want him to be a gladiator either

What a great comparison….


Gladiators were slaves that lead terrible lives and died penniless.


NFL football players are millionaire gods that bang supermodels.

houghtam
05-03-2012, 10:24 PM
What a great comparison….


Gladiators were slaves that lead terrible lives and died penniless.


NFL football players are millionaire gods that bang supermodels.

Might want to check up on your gladiatorial history there, chief.

Archer81
05-03-2012, 10:38 PM
What a great comparison….


Gladiators were slaves that lead terrible lives and died penniless.


NFL football players are millionaire gods that bang supermodels.


Not entirely accurate. Gladiators were the superstars of Rome. Gladiators who won and got the crowd on their side got their freedom. Gladiators did get paid. They could buy themselves to be free if they were wise with their pay. They were given the best food (sick gladiators dont do all that well) and housed. If they were good gladiators, they had their pick of men and women to sleep with. They could be traded to other houses.

They were slaves. They had short life spans. But compared to the general population, they did not exactly have the worst lives ever.

:Broncos:

spdirty
05-04-2012, 01:01 AM
My son fell off his bike today...scraped up his forehead, both knees, an elbow, and his right hip hurts. Maybe I should make him stop riding a bike...too dangerous eh?

Geez. Don't have pee wee football up here till kids get to 5th grade. Couple years away. By then hopefully my oldest will be more interested in football than art and piano.

broncocalijohn
05-04-2012, 01:25 AM
My kids currently play baseball and soccer. Even though my son was plucked on the cheek bone last season, I still feel it is much safer for my two kids then for them to play football. If my sons want to play football in high school, I could see them being a punter and kicker since they do well in kicking when they play soccer. BTW, if my sons were to play a tougher position like wide receiver, I would describe them as being a clone of Ed McCaffrey.

Ratboy
05-04-2012, 01:25 AM
there's a reason NFL's "Play 60" campaign is "get 60 minutes of physical activity a day" and not "play football 60 minutes a day."

The NFL knows what's up, and they know how hypocritical they'd be in asking for children to put themselves at that big a risk without improved safety measures.
http://static.nfl.com/static/content/public/image/play60/play60_03.jpg


You are really off on this one.

Ratboy
05-04-2012, 01:27 AM
Mt grandmother (dad's mom) wanted my brothers and I to do soccer. She viewed it as safer and more fun. So from 1st grade til 9th grade, I played soccer. And hated it. Even at 7 years old I hated running back and forth for an hour to get one goal. Maybe.

...Bleh.

:Broncos:

I'm guessing cheerleading was more of your thing.

cutthemdown
05-04-2012, 06:42 AM
The singer in my band has a bum knee. He's 6-6 285 pounds but he played in HS at 265. He's a big boy. He would have probably played at Alabama but he blew his knee out really bad junior season, came back blew same knee out sr season and was done.

He talks a lot about a RB he played with that he claims would have been a pro bowler for sure. But same thing got rang up his sr yr compound fracture of his leg.

If I had kids I think I would hope for them not to want to play football. But if a kid sulks, and wants it bad enough, and does all the things in his life like good grades, good citzenship, it would be pretty hard to say know. Even young men deserve a shot to make their own choices.

So for parents that are against say no a couple yrs, but if by sophomore yr of HS they are still begging, give them a shot. What is life without risks.

Ronnie Tsunami
05-04-2012, 06:44 AM
You are really off on this one.

okay, and what's your argument? that you don't agree?

cutthemdown
05-04-2012, 06:52 AM
What a great comparison….


Gladiators were slaves that lead terrible lives and died penniless.


NFL football players are millionaire gods that bang supermodels.

Not true. Many of the gladiators were freemen. The fought for money and glory. Many of the slave gladiators made more money then someone in the legion. True the died young and probably penniless. But I think because they knew they could die any month they probably just spent like crazy.

Not saying it was a great life, only that winning gladiators were stars on the streets of Rome. The rush from that probably the same as todays sports stars, boxing stars, MMA stars etc etc.

I wonder if the suicides are from brain damage, or maybe from just the fact you don't get to play anymore. So hard to not be important....now your just an ex football player.

cmhargrove
05-04-2012, 07:08 AM
Just for those who don't know, the whole cuncussion thing is being taken very seriously even at lower levels. My middle school and high school sons have to fill out concussion forms before each football season. They are taken to the doctor each year to pass their physical and if they display any concussion type symptoms during the season, they are held out for a minimum of two weeks (school disctict policy), and aren't allowed back on the field without a doctor's release. Multiple concussions within a three year period require a much longer rest period, and much stricter guidelines.

When my oldest son got to college this year, one of the first things they did was run each player through a battery of physical tests. Those tests included a "concussion baseline" test using computers to test their reactions. They keep this information on file for each player, and if they do sustain a concussion, they aren't allowed back in practice until thety can re-establish their pre-concussion baseline. My son plays for a nice DII program, so I could only imagine the resources available at the top DI programs. They do take this very seriously.

If we are just talking about knees, shoulders, and the like - kids can get injured performing any sport to the peak of their abiilities. My sport was competitive judo. I habitually dislocated a shoulder, tore my MCL, and broke/dislocated countless numbers of fingers and toes. Was it worth it? Hell yeah. You only get one go around in this life, and i'm not going to sit on the sidelines afraid to get hurt. To each their own, but if my kids want to play any sport whatsoever, i'll get them the best equipment, training, diet, and let them go at it.

houghtam
05-04-2012, 07:28 AM
I probably won't push him into or keep him out of anything. I will however remind him that Major League baseball offers one of the highest average salaries in professional sports.

ColoradoDarin
05-04-2012, 07:54 AM
I probably won't push him into or keep him out of anything. I will however remind him that Major League baseball offers one of the highest average salaries in professional sports.

Is he left-handed? The best way to get to the majors is being a lefty.... Going to teach my (right-handed) son to bat switch at least :)

houghtam
05-04-2012, 09:07 AM
Is he left-handed? The best way to get to the majors is being a lefty.... Going to teach my (right-handed) son to bat switch at least :)

Right now he throws with both and hits with both. Not expecting that to last, but when I clean him off after he eats, his left hand is usually the dirtiest, so we'll see. Unfortunately US born baseball players are at a huge disadvantage nowadays.

schaaf
05-04-2012, 09:46 AM
I'm 20 years old and can no longer play college football because of injuries I sustained while playing in high school. While playing in high school I dislocated my elbow, shoulder, and had 4 concussions. While at college I had a concussion that put me in the hospital for several days and I am still suffering with PCS and my grades are a direct reflection from it. I have had Reconstructive Shoulder Surgery and I also had surgery on my elbow to clean out and repair the joint. With all this said, if i have a son that wants to play football I would gladly push them to do it because regardless of what I have Football is and will be one of the most important things in my life.

schaaf
05-04-2012, 09:53 AM
Even in most high school programs the kids aren't big enough or fast enough to be at a serious risk for injury.

I couldn't disagree more. I myself was in a pregame practice and tackled the running back (I was playing Defensive Tackle) and my best friend (playing MLB) tackled him too and my arm was extended in the tackle and it completely dislocated my elbow. When I was a senior our punt returner compound fractured his lower leg. As the O-Line/D-Line coach this year for my high school we played a kid in Lewistown that compound fractured his leg and dislocated his ankle (almost exactly like Kuper's). These are just some of the injuries ive witnessed in Montana football not even counting the ACL tears, concussions, snapped arms and many more

Archer81
05-04-2012, 09:56 AM
Soccer screwed up my shoulder (ran into a goalpost at full speed...) and both ankles. Ah, sports.


:Broncos:

Punisher
05-04-2012, 10:05 AM
Hell no my son is not coming near Football. You want to put your kid in either baseball, soccer and lacrosse if there any good at either one they'll almost guarantee a scholarship.

DBroncos4life
05-04-2012, 10:08 AM
Soccer screwed up my shoulder (ran into a goalpost at full speed...) and both ankles. Ah, sports.


:Broncos:

http://s16.postimage.org/4jaq10mch/images.jpg (http://postimage.org/image/4jaq10mch/)

Archer81
05-04-2012, 10:08 AM
http://s16.postimage.org/4jaq10mch/images.jpg (http://postimage.org/image/4jaq10mch/)


Pretty much. Soccer taught me one thing. Pay attention.

:Broncos:

StugotsIII
05-04-2012, 10:32 AM
Might want to check up on your gladiatorial history there, chief.

The trade in gladiators was Empire-wide, and subjected to official supervision. Rome's military success produced an influx of soldier-prisoners who were redistributed for use in State mines or amphitheatres and for sale on the open market. For example, in the aftermath of the Jewish Revolt, the gladiator schools received an influx of Jews – those rejected for training would have been sent straight to the arenas as noxii (lit. "hurtful ones").[60] The best – the most robust – were sent to Rome. The granting of slave status to soldiers who had surrendered or allowed their own capture was regarded as an unmerited gift of life and gladiator training was an opportunity for them to regain their honour in the munus.[61]


Pollice Verso ("With a Turned Thumb"), an 1872 painting by Jean-Léon Gérôme, is a well known historical painter's researched conception of a gladiatorial combat.
Two other sources of gladiators, found increasingly during the Principate and the Pax Romana, were slaves condemned to the arena, to gladiator schools or games (ad ludum gladiatorium)[62] as punishment for crimes, and paid volunteers (auctorati) who by the late Republic may have comprised approximately half – and possibly the most capable half – of all gladiators.[63] The use of volunteers had a precedent in the Iberian munus of Scipio Africanus; but none of those had been paid.[18] For Romans, "gladiator" would have meant a schooled fighter, sworn and contracted to a master.
For those who were poor or non-citizens, the gladiator schools offered a trade, regular food, housing of sorts and a fighting chance of fame and fortune. Gladiators customarily kept their prize money and any gifts they received. Tiberius offered several retired gladiators 100,000 sesterces ($500,000) each to return to the arena.[64] Nero gave the gladiator Spiculus property and residence "equal to those of men who had celebrated triumphs." [65] Mark Antony promoted gladiators to his personal guard.[6




The bottom line is comparing gladiators to football players if retarded.

TonyR
05-04-2012, 10:40 AM
Said (Gary) Plummer: “In the 1990s, I did a concussion seminar. They said a Grade 3 concussion meant you were knocked out, and a Grade 1 meant you were seeing stars after a hit, which made me burst out in laughter. As a middle linebacker in the NFL, if you don’t have five of these (Grade 1 effects) each game, you were inactive the next game.

“Junior played for 20 years. That’s five concussions a game, easily. How many in his career then? That’s over 1,500 concussions. I know that’s startling, but I know it’s true. I had over 1,000 in my 15 years. I felt the effects of it. I felt depression going on throughout my divorce. Junior went through it with his divorce.”

http://www.mercurynews.com/49ers/ci_20542616/former-seau-teammate-gary-plummer-he-was-crying

Pony Boy
05-04-2012, 11:14 AM
I have a son that was big enough and talented enough to play division 1 football but chose to take an academic scholarship instead and he is now a very successful surgeon, ......He made the correct choice.

Archer81
05-04-2012, 11:44 AM
The bottom line is comparing gladiators to football players if retarded.


Yes. I mean, 65,000 people cheering while two groups of men beat the **** out of eachother is nothing like Gladitorial games in Rome. Not at all.


:Broncos:

Meck77
05-04-2012, 12:04 PM
Soccer screwed up my shoulder (ran into a goalpost at full speed...) and both ankles. Ah, sports.


:Broncos:

I blasted my shoulder in a half pipe in vail in 2000. Tore my rotator cuff. Took 10 years to heal. Just wasn't worth it. Fixed it by soaking in a hot spring for 4 solid years in Steamboat though. :)

I'd probably let my boy play but in the end the damage to ones body just isn't really worth it. If I have a son I'd probably steer him towards becoming a fishing champion like OU. ;D

Bronco_Beerslug
05-04-2012, 12:59 PM
Interesting results so far, almost 50% of those who voted would prefer their son(s) not play football.

Reading some comments, some think that injury is just as probable in other sports. Not sure how many kids are playing Lacrosse, Hockey, etc... in the country but I wouldn't think any of the other H.S. sports are anywhere near as violent as football, just my opinion.

I know when my son played (late 90s) I really didn't think about a serious injury. He was 6'-3" and about 290 when he played but did get hurt his senior year and will probably have pain the rest of his life in his lower back.

I love the game and always will but might think twice these days about being as enthusiastic about him playing the game now as I was then.



http://i49.tinypic.com/15n3jnd.jpg

Butterscotch Stallion
05-04-2012, 01:07 PM
I much prefer my son get a facebook page, watch glee and buy lulu Lemon pants.

BroncoBeavis
05-04-2012, 01:12 PM
Interesting results so far, almost 50% of those who voted would prefer their son(s) not play football.

Reading some comments, some think that injury is just as probable in other sports. Not sure how many kids are playing Lacrosse, Hockey, etc... in the country but I wouldn't think any of the other H.S. sports are anywhere near as violent as football, just my opinion.

I know when my son played (late 90s) I really didn't think about a serious injury. He was 6'-3" and about 290 when he played but did get hurt his senior year and will probably have pain the rest of his life in his lower back.

I love the game and always will but might think twice these days about being as enthusiastic about him playing the game now as I was then.



http://i49.tinypic.com/15n3jnd.jpg

I've never seen comparative statistics, but anecdotally I'd think just as many baseball players die from field-related accidents as football.

As to other kinds of injury, I doubt baseball is as severe. But there's definitely a good amount of risk in baseball.

StugotsIII
05-04-2012, 08:24 PM
Yes. I mean, 65,000 people cheering while two groups of men beat the **** out of eachother is nothing like Gladitorial games in Rome. Not at all.


:Broncos:

Yeah...that's what they do...



More like 65,000 people watching millionares run fast and bang into each other...not use swords to slice each other apart...

Dedhed
05-04-2012, 08:33 PM
Yeah...that's what they do...



More like 65,000 people watching millionares run fast and bang into each other...not use swords to slice each other apart...

Let it go bro. You put your foot in your mouth. Deal with it and walk away.

Turd_Ferguson
05-04-2012, 09:43 PM
I played football in high school. In four years I suffered one sprained ankle, and a jammed finger.

When I was in 4th grade I was at a playground waiting for a spelling bee to start and some dick shoved me off the slide. I landed head first and was knocked unconscious. I ended up with a concussion.

As a parent I will never let my kids go down a slide... I personally loved slides and all the excitement they brought, but I just can't allow my kids to engage in something as dangerous as slides... For God sakes there's a one in 10,000 chance if he goes off too many slides he could suffer extreme depression and kill himself later in life.

Dedhed
05-04-2012, 09:53 PM
I played football in high school. In four years I suffered one sprained ankle, and a jammed finger.

When I was in 4th grade I was at a playground waiting for a spelling bee to start and some dick shoved me off the slide. I landed head first and was knocked unconscious. I ended up with a concussion.

As a parent I will never let my kids go down a slide... I personally loved slides and all the excitement they brought, but I just can't allow my kids to engage in something as dangerous as slides... For God sakes there's a one in 10,000 chance if he goes off too many slides he could suffer extreme depression and kill himself later in life.

Sarcasm fail: when your sarcastic analogy is just too dumb for words.

Bacchus
05-04-2012, 10:58 PM
I suffered numerous concussions in college. In fact I liked getting them because they put me into a zone and I felt I played better after my "bell was rung" Today I can barely remember college. I remember some people I went to school with but it is hard for me to remember specific instances. It is really frustrating because I had a great time in college. Lots of times on FB when I have a friend request I have to ask one of my good friends who this person is and if he remembers him.

I have no sons just a daughter and I will not let her play football, smile.

Stuck in Cali
05-04-2012, 11:20 PM
My son is 6 yrs old. If he asked me if he could play football, I would allow it.

Archer81
05-04-2012, 11:24 PM
My dad played football in HS. This was the early 1970s. Never got hurt beyond some bruises and sprains. Then one day in school, he ran down a hallway that had been mopped and slipped. Went headfirst into a concrete wall and messed up his vision. Got a cracked skull and a concussion.

The message?

School is more dangerous than school sports.

:Broncos:

DBroncos4life
05-05-2012, 12:24 AM
My dad played football in HS. This was the early 1970s. Never got hurt beyond some bruises and sprains. Then one day in school, he ran down a hallway that had been mopped and slipped. Went headfirst into a concrete wall and messed up his vision. Got a cracked skull and a concussion.

The message?

School is more dangerous than school sports.

:Broncos:

My son cut open his foot on the front door. He ended up with 7 stiches. I do sleep better at night now that i removed that door.

Mogulseeker
05-05-2012, 12:47 AM
If I could do it over I would definitely learn golf at a young age. I really wish I could play well now, and I think the best way to have an effortless game is to learn it when you're young. What do I have to show for football? Bad knees and bad back.

My 6 year old cousin was driving the ball 150 yards yesterday. By far the best the guys at Fox Hollow had seen from a kid that young.

The thing is, I'm a fairly decent golfer and my little cousin beats me on the putting green sometimes.

I'm investing in him lessons at Foothills Golf Club with a guy named Ron Vlosich... he finished like 99th at the US Senior open a while back.

He's incredibly athletic - his Dad was a pro soccer player and his mother a High School track star-turned-marathon runner. His dad is 6'3" (my uncle - my mom's brother) and his mom is 5'6" - I'm teaching him all I know about football and trying to teach him proper throwing motion and coverage skills... my early hunch is that he would be a good QB or Free Safety (like his cousin... myself).

I don't think his mom wants to let him to play football though.

But I think the golf lessons are going to end up being a pretty good idea.

broncocalijohn
05-05-2012, 01:19 AM
Interesting results so far, almost 50% of those who voted would prefer their son(s) not play football.

BLAH BLAH BLAH

http://i49.tinypic.com/15n3jnd.jpg

As I see it in your poll picture that you included, I notice you have an unread PM (personal mail) that you rudely didn't bother to answer right off the bat. Unless it is Ant calling you an old fart, go click it and don't make that Maner wait any longer.

Bronco_Beerslug
05-05-2012, 06:49 AM
As I see it in your poll picture that you included, I notice you have an unread PM (personal mail) that you rudely didn't bother to answer right off the bat. Unless it is Ant calling you an old fart, go click it and don't make that Maner wait any longer.

I think that one was from you from 2004. :wave:


Yep here it is...


05-04-2004 Buy Discounted Female Viagra, Cialis and get Free pills!
11:35 AM broncocalijohn

ColoradoDarin
05-05-2012, 08:17 AM
I'll teach my son to play like Marvin Harrison - catch the ball and fall down like it's 2 hand touch (and get up if the Broncos D doesn't touch you... ugh)

Pony Boy
05-05-2012, 08:35 AM
I suffered numerous concussions in college. In fact I liked getting them because they put me into a zone and I felt I played better after my "bell was rung" Today I can barely remember college. I remember some people I went to school with but it is hard for me to remember specific instances. It is really frustrating because I had a great time in college. Lots of times on FB when I have a friend request I have to ask one of my good friends who this person is and if he remembers him.

I have no sons just a daughter and I will not let her play football, smile.

When I was playing we got a new punter and at his first practice we let him get creamed on his first snap from scrimmage, the old "welcome to the team tradition". When he stood up his helmet was on sideways and his nickname became "ear-hole" ......... 30 plus years later we all still call him ear-hole.

Bacchus
05-05-2012, 10:09 AM
When I was playing we got a new punter and at his first practice we let him get creamed on his first snap from scrimmage, the old "welcome to the team tradition". When he stood up his helmet was on sideways and his nickname became "ear-hole" ......... 30 plus years later we all still call him ear-hole.

LMAO... that is funny!!

Bronco_Beerslug
05-05-2012, 07:12 PM
As I see it in your poll picture that you included, I notice you have an unread PM (personal mail) that you rudely didn't bother to answer right off the bat. Unless it is Ant calling you an old fart, go click it and don't make that Maner wait any longer.
Are you this person, if not why the interest?

Some OM members (including me) may have received spam in your PM inboxes. Just wanted to let everyone know the spammer has been dealt with (the permaban hammer has been wielded).

Broncos_OTM
05-05-2012, 09:01 PM
Easy for the white guys to say yes... Like they will ever have a chance of going professional Hilarious!

2/3 of the broncos of the broncos first three picks .. white guys.

Castle
05-05-2012, 09:16 PM
This is a kind of weird one as someone in Britain answering this. NFl seems to take it out of players where RB's get 4 years playing - that is crazy! When it's arguable that Rugby is a tougher game. However injury-wise NFL wins hands down, as it the angles and hits people take are bigger I think. Rugby is probably a mentally tougher game, but NFL is crazy with physicality, due to the pads (becoming weapons) and hits.

fdf
05-05-2012, 10:57 PM
I'll take a bum knee at age 50 rather than being a fat ass diabetic anyday.

Bum knees at 50 are not so much fun. And, they make it a lot harder to stay fit and avoid being a fat ass diabetic. They're even less fun at 60.

Take my word for it.

Bronco_Beerslug
05-05-2012, 11:15 PM
Bum knees at 50 are not so much fun. And, they make it a lot harder to stay fit and avoid being a fat ass diabetic. They're even less fun at 60.
Take my word for it.
Yeah, anyone who says they will "take one, hasn't had one".

Archer81
05-06-2012, 01:39 AM
This is a kind of weird one as someone in Britain answering this. NFl seems to take it out of players where RB's get 4 years playing - that is crazy! When it's arguable that Rugby is a tougher game. However injury-wise NFL wins hands down, as it the angles and hits people take are bigger I think. Rugby is probably a mentally tougher game, but NFL is crazy with physicality, due to the pads (becoming weapons) and hits.


I think part of it is RB's have been playing (most of them) since Pop Warner. So from the age of 6 until they are 26, they are carrying a football while 11 other guys are trying to hit them as hard as they can. That's alot of wear on a body. The guys who can do it for a decade -Emmett Smith, Dickerson, LaDanian Tomlinson- are rare.

:Broncos:

BroncoBeavis
05-06-2012, 06:03 AM
Bum knees at 50 are not so much fun. And, they make it a lot harder to stay fit and avoid being a fat ass diabetic. They're even less fun at 60.

Take my word for it.

Not trying to be a dick or anything but have you looked into knee replacement. I've heard nothing but good things. After the first few weeks anyway. :)

cmhargrove
05-06-2012, 10:27 AM
Yeah, anyone who says they will "take one, hasn't had one".

While its not a requirement to read previous posts, it certainly is a courtesy. I listed my injuries from years of competitive judo, and so I offered my opinion from my experience.

Left knee isn't perfect, left shoulder pops out, big toes on both feet can dislocate pretty easily, rib cage feels a little funny from chondrocostal separations. I loved every minute of it.

I still work out 4-5 days a week, and will be training at a boxing gym this summer. Being old is an attitude, I'm not accusing you I that personally, but I stand by my opinion - i'd rather spend my life challenging my limits than living with complacency and regret.

houghtam
05-06-2012, 10:46 AM
While its not a requirement to read previous posts, it certainly is a courtesy. I listed my injuries from years of competitive judo, and so I offered my opinion from my experience.

Left knee isn't perfect, left shoulder pops out, big toes on both feet can dislocate pretty easily, rib cage feels a little funny from chondrocostal separations. I loved every minute of it.

I still work out 4-5 days a week, and will be training at a boxing gym this summer. Being old is an attitude, I'm not accusing you I that personally, but I stand by my opinion - i'd rather spend my life challenging my limits than living with complacency and regret.

Then you probably should have said that. What you did say was "I'll take a bum knee over diabetes any day" (sic), as if the two are the only choices, and if you don't play sports, you'll get diabetes.

I wasn't allowed to play football when I was in HS, and I always held it against my parents. Then growing up, meeting several people who only played in HS who have debilitating injuries 20 years after the fact, I started feeling like they did me a favor. Sure, it would have been fun, but maybe I'm fortunate I didn't play in HS after all.

StugotsIII
05-06-2012, 10:58 AM
If my kid wanted to play football I'd let him…


I'm not going to push the kid into it or hold him out of it…

bowtown
05-06-2012, 11:47 AM
This is how boxing faded away into niche status.

Parents didn't want their sons playing, highschool boxing classes were cancelled from low attendance, and a new generation was born that had no interest in the sport.

The concussion studies were the beginning of the end for football.

Disagree. The demise of boxing had much more to do with the promoters totally pricing the fans out and setting up a complete dichotomy between the people who could afford to view a boxing match (even on tv) and those who might one day be interested in actually being a professional boxer.

Personal Seat Licenses have way more to do with any end of football than concussion studies do.

houghtam
05-06-2012, 11:52 AM
Disagree. The demise of boxing had much more to do with the promoters totally pricing the fans out and setting up a complete dichotomy between the people who could afford to view a boxing match (even on tv) and those who might one day be interested in actually being a professional boxer.

Personal Seat Licenses have way more to do with any end of football than concussion studies do.

Totes magotes. If you wanted to watch a fight 50 years ago, you turned on the radio or tv. Anymore to see a halfway decent fight, at the very least you have to have HBO, if not spring for PPV. Now the promoters make a lot more money than they used to, but the sport is watched by a mere fraction of the people who used to.

cmhargrove
05-06-2012, 01:08 PM
Then you probably should have said that. What you did say was "I'll take a bum knee over diabetes any day" (sic), as if the two are the only choices, and if you don't play sports, you'll get diabetes.

I wasn't allowed to play football when I was in HS, and I always held it against my parents. Then growing up, meeting several people who only played in HS who have debilitating injuries 20 years after the fact, I started feeling like they did me a favor. Sure, it would have been fun, but maybe I'm fortunate I didn't play in HS after all.

I don't know why I feel argumentative today, but i'll bite. You inferred a false dichotomy, a common logical error. I didn't state there were only 2 choics in life, I merely stated my frame of reference, and the personal choice I had made. You inferred these statements as being exclusive and universal.

Live how you want to live, to each their own. I really don't need to convince you of my opinion on this subject. My kids and I play hard, they all three play football, and I don't regret it.

ward63
05-06-2012, 04:03 PM
Whenever (If) I have a son, I would want him to play football, but I am not going to be upset if he doesn't. I would like for him to be active in something though and I would support him no matter what.

broncocalijohn
05-06-2012, 05:08 PM
Are you this person, if not why the interest?

To take the post seriously, you must be really old.

Bronco_Beerslug
05-06-2012, 08:21 PM
While its not a requirement to read previous posts, it certainly is a courtesy. I listed my injuries from years of competitive judo, and so I offered my opinion from my experience.

Left knee isn't perfect, left shoulder pops out, big toes on both feet can dislocate pretty easily, rib cage feels a little funny from chondrocostal separations. I loved every minute of it.

I still work out 4-5 days a week, and will be training at a boxing gym this summer. Being old is an attitude, I'm not accusing you I that personally, but I stand by my opinion - i'd rather spend my life challenging my limits than living with complacency and regret.
I applaud your effort to still stay in shape, especially after reading the latest articles about how "fat" America is now.

My immediate impression of a "bum knee" is what a good friend of mine has and he is basically disabled from it (can't really work out at all), and needs a total replacement.

I'm similar to you though in the wear and tear thing, both knees and shoulders scoped, lower back surgery and can still work out a few times a week, so I feel pretty fortunate.

cmhargrove
05-09-2012, 07:22 AM
Today show clip from this morning about girls soccer and concussions. They don't really list the data, but say that girls playing soccer are reporting concussions at a higher rate than boys playing football. Not that it makes either sport good, but I wonder if we won't see "soccer helmets" within the next 10 years?

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Bronco_Beerslug
05-09-2012, 08:21 AM
Today show clip from this morning about girls soccer and concussions. They don't really list the data, but say that girls playing soccer are reporting concussions at a higher rate than boys playing football. Not that it makes either sport good, but I wonder if we won't see "soccer helmets" within the next 10 years?

If soccer moms have any say it probably will happen within the next couple of years.

It seems to me that the football helmet really hasn't advanced a whole lot over the years. Maybe some type of a "softer" shell would reduce head injuries?

R-Mac
05-09-2012, 10:47 AM
https://twitter.com/#!/ReverendRalph

Bill Romanowski on ESPN Radio asked whether he evr tried taking Trent Dilfer out of a game. He replied, "No, he's a guy u wanted 2 keep in."

McDman
05-09-2012, 11:55 AM
Youth football, eh, whatever. Anything past that, no.

I will have my sons play lacrosse and soccer.

Castle
05-10-2012, 05:40 PM
I have to disagree with Bowtown sorry my friend re Boxing. The reason there is no good world Heavyweights in my view is the NFL. The big potential boxers are poached from young and end up in college and NFL. What happened to the great American Heavyweights. FFS I am British and we are terrible these days as well as are the Americans. Something is wrong. Where is the next Tyson? Instead we have a few Russian bum brothers klitschko's who live in Germany dominating. Now as a Brit with heavyweight champs and for you guys in America it's a joke. What is going on!?

StugotsIII
05-10-2012, 05:46 PM
Youth football, eh, whatever. Anything past that, no.

I will have my sons play lacrosse and soccer.

Fag.

Al Wilson 4 Mayor
05-10-2012, 05:47 PM
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/cS-s-6uSKKI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Al Wilson 4 Mayor
05-10-2012, 05:49 PM
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/nbHzHorB9XI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Al Wilson 4 Mayor
05-10-2012, 05:50 PM
Does that answer the question? ;D

StugotsIII
05-10-2012, 05:51 PM
Does that answer the question? ;D

Who was working the camera, Stevie Wonder?

Al Wilson 4 Mayor
05-10-2012, 05:53 PM
Who was working the camera, Stevie Wonder?

LOL, I had to hold it free hand in the bleachers because there wasn't a spot to put the tripod. Sorry about that.

This one isn't much better, but most of it's shot from a tripod.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TZCVKilpbaA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>