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Bronco Rob
04-22-2012, 03:47 PM
Former Alabama football players get stem cell injections from Gulf Shores doctor


Published: Sunday, April 22, 2012, 7:07 AM By Casandra Andrews, Press-Register




MOBILE, Alabama -- At the end of this past season with the Oakland Raiders, an aching Rolando McClain gave an assignment to his agent: Find out more about stem cell therapies for injuries, like other athletes are trying.

“I’ve been having two seasons of nagging pain in my knee,” the former University of Alabama standout said.

Not long afterward, McClain was on his way to Gulf Shores.

There, radiologist Jason R. Williams performed liposuction on McClain and then injected stem cells from the linebacker’s own fat cells into his knee and into the area of a high ankle sprain.

“It feels a lot better,” McClain said in an interview last week, adding that he’s working out four days a week with the Raiders, running, lifting weights, doing squats and even sprinting “with hardly any pain at all.”

About three months ago, Williams, 38, began the new procedure in which he injects patients -- two of them being McClain and former University of Alabama receiver Marquis Maze -- with their own stem cells in an effort to repair damaged joints and muscles.

“This is going to be the future of medicine,” said Williams, who owns Precision StemCell, which includes a diagnostic and interventional radiology practice in Gulf Shores.

Stem cells, sometimes called the body’s master cells, are precursor cells that develop into blood, bones and organs, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which regulates their use.

Their promise in medicine, according to many scientists and doctors, is that the cells have the potential to help and regenerate other cells.

While Williams’ treatments are considered investigational, he said, they meet FDA guidelines since the stem cells are collected from a patient’s fat tissue and administered back to that patient during the same procedure.


Because of their experimental nature, stem cell injections to remedy conditions such as damaged knee joints or injured muscles are not covered by insurance. A typical stem cell therapy with Williams costs about $15,000. The collection of the cells through liposuction, he said, makes up about half of the overall price.

Williams said he spent about four years researching various stem cell therapies, including those collected from bone marrow. He said that the adult stem cells derived from fat tissue seemed to bring fewer chances for complications.

Harvesting stem cells from a patient’s own fat removes the need to culture cells, Williams said, explaining that culturing stem cells can be a weeks-long process that may expose patients to risks such as infection.

In recent years, professional athletes such as Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning and New York Yankees pitcher Bartolo Colon, among dozens of others, have acknowledged seeking stem cell injections outside the U.S. to try to help heal injuries.


FDA urges caution

In January, the FDA issued a consumer warning about claims regarding stem cells.

In it, Stephanie Simek, deputy director of the FDA’s Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, said that stem cells from bone marrow or blood are routinely used in transplant procedures to treat cancer and disorders of the blood and immune system.

The document cautioned consumers, however, to make sure that stem cell therapy treatments have been approved by the FDA or are being studied under a clinical investigation allowed to proceed by the agency.

“There is a potential safety risk when you put cells in an area where they are not performing the same biological function as they were when in their original location in the body,” Simek said.

Cells in a different environment may multiply, form tumors, or may migrate elsewhere in the body from the spot where they were placed, according to the FDA warning.

In March 2008, a group of pain management doctors published the first study of successful cartilage regeneration in a human knee using adult stem cells, although those cells were not derived from fat.


While several dozen clinical trials involving various forms of stem cell therapies are under way or have been announced around the world, few have included adult stem cells found in fat tissue.

Williams said that universities and research groups have been slow to move forward because research funding tends to steer toward new drug therapies.

He said that he is up front with his patients, telling them that results cannot be predicted.

“It might not work for everybody. There’s a lot of cases that we are taking on right now that have never really been done. It’s the type of thing that if it works, it will be monumental,” he said.

Williams said he feels it is safe to inject someone’s own fat cells back into his or her own body. “There’s been no evidence of problems,” he said.

He said that similar injections have been performed in Asian hospitals and clinics for several years.

Stem cell therapies also have been successfully used in veterinary medicine -- in horses, cats and dogs -- to treat everything from heart attacks to tendon and ligament damage.


How it works

Here’s how Williams said his stem cell therapy procedure works:

Once collected in a tube through liposuction, the fat tissue is processed to separate the adult stem cells. Those cells do not leave the container until being returned to the patient. Williams injects the minimally processed stem cells the same day -- about two hours later -- under computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance.

To give the greatest possible benefit, stem cells must be injected into the exact location of an injury, Williams said. When a doctor uses CT scans or an MRI for guidance, there’s a better chance of putting the cells in the correct location.

The results, so far, have been startling, Williams said: “I was expecting some improvement. They’ve got cartilage regrowth. It’s unbelievable to see those changes.”

During the 2012 BCS National Championship game against LSU, Marquis Maze almost returned a punt for a touchdown before partially tearing a hamstring. Television cameras captured Maze on the sideline, visibly shaken by the game-ending injury.

About a month ago, after talking to McClain and another of Williams’ patients, Mobile car dealership manager Mitch McConnell, Maze received a stem cell injection in his hamstring at the Gulf Shores clinic.

The 24-year old Maze said that the pain in his leg subsided in about two weeks. “I don’t feel any tightness in it,” he said last week, adding that he’s been running and working out daily as the NFL draft approaches.


A path to stem cell therapy

After earning a medical degree from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Louisiana, Williams began an internship in internal medicine at the University of South Alabama and a residency in radiology at USA.

After a few years, he took a leave of absence from USA to treat cancer patients that many other doctors wouldn’t with novel therapies such as cancer ablation from a practice he established in Gulf Shores in 2004.

He eventually returned to USA, completed his residency and took a job in Mississippi, becoming director of radiology for Northwest Regional Medical Center in Clarksdale.

In 2009, he opened an image-guided radiology clinic in Gulf Shores, recently renaming it Precision StemCell.

As he pored over ways to deliver stem cells to patients, he said, he became interested in the company Medi-Khan, with roots in Korea, because it offered a patented enclosed system for harvesting the adipose tissue.

Williams said that Medi-Khan staff members came to his office and taught him how to use the system.

Bob Hubbard, director of stem cell therapy at the clinic, and a former assistant basketball coach at the University of Alabama, received stem cell injections himself a few months ago to treat a torn ligament in his knee, among other issues.

“Within two weeks we actually had increased cartilage in my knee,” said Hubbard, a physician’s assistant before his career in coaching. “I think it’s absolutely a medical marvel and it’s going to change the way we practice medicine in this country.”





http://blog.al.com/live/2012/04/stem_cell_injections_offered_b.html

Vegas_Bronco
04-22-2012, 04:43 PM
Go Williams! More medicine needs to get away from the drug mentalityand look at self healing.

I had a neighbor who had cancer and receiving stem cell treatments in Mexico...there is an entire generation of medical tourists who reside/retire in Mexico for these and other treatments that the FDA disapproves of. FDA is a joke...overpaid and funded by the pharms lobbyists.

Shananahan
04-22-2012, 04:45 PM
Were they ever?

Chris
04-22-2012, 04:47 PM
I had a neighbor who had cancer and receiving stem cell treatments in Mexico...there is an entire generation of medical tourists who reside/retire in Mexico for these and other treatments that the FDA disapproves of. FDA is a joke...overpaid and funded by the pharms lobbyists.

I agree. The issue is it needs to not be a bought out joke so public health is protected.

Then again, I'd argue the same thing for both parties in DC right now.

WolfpackGuy
04-22-2012, 05:20 PM
FDA is a joke...overpaid and funded by the pharms lobbyists.

Agreed.

Unfortunately, the money is in treating the sicknesses, not the cures.

Gort
04-22-2012, 05:37 PM
you guys watch too many conspiracy movies.

without the advancements made by private pharmaceutical companies using their own money, your lives would all be shorter and more painful.

i honestly don't understand what has happened to reason and common sense anymore. we have idiot parents who won't let their kids get vaccinated based on completely bogus junk science warning them against it. we have parents who won't let their kids use tap water because it's flouridated. we even have a whole bunch of crackpots who think these companies know a cure for cancer but are deliberately hiding it.

newsflash... the people running these companies have kids too. they are not out to poison or exploit anyone. they want to cure the world's diseases, but they also want to make a living doing it. there is nothing wrong with that and they've made our average lifespan go up every year for decades.

if you want to live without vaccines or flouridated water or the benefits of modern medicine and pharmaceuticals, i'm sure you can find a nice spot in the Congo or Rwanda or Liberia where you'll be free from those "awful" things. your lifespan will also be about 40 years as well.

Kaylore
04-22-2012, 05:59 PM
That south park with Christopher Reeves was funny.

Chris
04-22-2012, 06:01 PM
without the advancements made by private pharmaceutical companies using their own money, your lives would all be shorter and more painful.


Sorry I need to backtrack here somewhat. My issue isn't with big pharma (though the ads on TV being legal here is RIDICULOUS) it's with the FDA itself, which fast tracks potentially dangerous drugs. Meh still irrelevant. ****ing tired and at work. None of my argument is coherent at this point.

Houshyamama
04-22-2012, 06:03 PM
What is your reasoning for considering this procedure a "performance enhancing drug"?

Shananahan
04-22-2012, 06:18 PM
My issue isn't with big pharma (though the ads on TV being legal here is RIDICULOUS)
Seen this one?

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houghtam
04-22-2012, 07:59 PM
Sorry I need to backtrack here somewhat. My issue isn't with big pharma (though the ads on TV being legal here is RIDICULOUS) it's with the FDA itself, which fast tracks potentially dangerous drugs. Meh still irrelevant. ****ing tired and at work. None of my argument is coherent at this point.

Good clarification.

The FDA fast tracks dangerous drugs and procedures, AND it blocks others.

The disc replacement surgery my brother received in Germany in 2004 is a good example of this. The FDA finally approved single-level disc replacement in 2005...Germany had been doing it since the 80's. My brother received two-level disc replacement, which is still considered "experimental" in the US...Germany had been doing that since the 80's as well.

Bronco_Beerslug
04-22-2012, 08:02 PM
Good clarification.

The FDA fast tracks dangerous drugs and procedures, AND it blocks others.

The disc replacement surgery my brother received in Germany in 2004 is a good example of this. The FDA finally approved single-level disc replacement in 2005...Germany had been doing it since the 80's. My brother received two-level disc replacement, which is still considered "experimental" in the US...Germany had been doing that since the 80's as well.
So what is his physical status now from the spine operation?

Bronco Boy
04-22-2012, 08:14 PM
you guys watch too many conspiracy movies.

without the advancements made by private pharmaceutical companies using their own money, your lives would all be shorter and more painful.

i honestly don't understand what has happened to reason and common sense anymore. we have idiot parents who won't let their kids get vaccinated based on completely bogus junk science warning them against it. we have parents who won't let their kids use tap water because it's flouridated. we even have a whole bunch of crackpots who think these companies know a cure for cancer but are deliberately hiding it.

newsflash... the people running these companies have kids too. they are not out to poison or exploit anyone. they want to cure the world's diseases, but they also want to make a living doing it. there is nothing wrong with that and they've made our average lifespan go up every year for decades.

if you want to live without vaccines or flourinated water or the benefits of modern medicine and pharmaceuticals, i'm sure you can find a nice spot in the Congo or Rwanda or Liberia where you'll be free from those "awful" things. your lifespan will also be about 40 years as well.

Companies aren't out to exploit anyone? Haha, whatever you say cockstache.

houghtam
04-22-2012, 08:52 PM
So what is his physical status now from the spine operation?

He's fit as a fiddle.

He's in his 40's, 6'8", played college and semi-pro baseball and college basketball for years...his height and lifestyle pretty much destroyed his spine in the L3-L5 (if I remember correctly) area. He had numbness in his arm, hand and both legs. Went to a symposium in CA where he was referred to a doctor from the Alpha Klinik in Munich. They replaced two discs via a surgery where they went in through the front, and we were literally walking in downtown Munich two days after the surgery. The previous 4 back surgeries he had laid him up for weeks/months.

Now, he plays golf, hockey, and is an umpire in So Cal. He can pick up his kids, and he lives a normal life...outside of the massive cost of the surgery, which of course was not covered by his insurance company. The reason? "Experimental" surgery. >:'(

As the doctor who did the surgery told him (imagine him saying this with a thick Dutch accent -- it's hilarious) "Your back will be fine. You can get in an auto accident at 200 kilometers per hour. Of course we do not recommend this."

DenverBrit
04-22-2012, 09:12 PM
Agreed.

Unfortunately, the money is in treating the sicknesses, not the cures.

Nor prevention. :)

Bigdawg26
04-22-2012, 09:31 PM
you guys watch too many conspiracy movies.

without the advancements made by private pharmaceutical companies using their own money, your lives would all be shorter and more painful.

i honestly don't understand what has happened to reason and common sense anymore. we have idiot parents who won't let their kids get vaccinated based on completely bogus junk science warning them against it. we have parents who won't let their kids use tap water because it's flouridated. we even have a whole bunch of crackpots who think these companies know a cure for cancer but are deliberately hiding it.

newsflash... the people running these companies have kids too. they are not out to poison or exploit anyone. they want to cure the world's diseases, but they also want to make a living doing it. there is nothing wrong with that and they've made our average lifespan go up every year for decades.

if you want to live without vaccines or flourinated water or the benefits of modern medicine and pharmaceuticals, i'm sure you can find a nice spot in the Congo or Rwanda or Liberia where you'll be free from those "awful" things. your lifespan will also be about 40 years as well.

Actually that's a bit inconsistent! People who received those vaccines were not actually wrong from getting them. Viruses like most living organisms adapt to survive. Which means the small pox back in the day is not the same small box now. It has mutated it's genome to survive! Sparing you the details of how it actually happens, the vaccines aren't always the problem. The problem is after a researcher discovers a cure for the diseases he is no longer funded meaning he loses his job. So the profit is in vaccine, and it's lobbyists that actually mess it up for everybody. Most companies (unless you work for the government) jobs are not that secure as you want to believe. So lobbyist take advantage of the companies.
But not to get all political I think stem cell therapy is awesome. It really assist in repairing your body and doesn't really improve strength or anything. It was a bit ridiculous how the last president banned it and cut funding TREMENDOUSLY on science which we are still pretty much struggling to get back on track (although it's getting better). AGAIN, I don't want to get political just take this post as an innocent young immunologist/geneticist just voicing his opinion!

That One Guy
04-22-2012, 11:08 PM
What is your reasoning for considering this procedure a "performance enhancing drug"?

I'm stupid.

That said, the "it happens in one operation" logic seems silly. If that's a critical factor, they're silly as well.

That said, how does this differ from HGH? I don't know much (See above) about the things but I have a hard time saying anything should be illegal if it clearly leads back to a quicker health. However, if HGH is illegal, it seems like this should be for a similar reason. If an experimental treatment for which the risks are unknown is allowing some to recover faster than others...?

snowspot66
04-22-2012, 11:21 PM
I'm stupid.

That said, the "it happens in one operation" logic seems silly. If that's a critical factor, they're silly as well.

That said, how does this differ from HGH? I don't know much (See above) about the things but I have a hard time saying anything should be illegal if it clearly leads back to a quicker health. However, if HGH is illegal, it seems like this should be for a similar reason. If an experimental treatment for which the risks are unknown is allowing some to recover faster than others...?

I imagine even HGH would be permissible in the NFL with a legitimate medical reason behind it. All of these examples seem pretty legitimate to me and considering how the procedure works (and how much it costs) I can't see a significant number of people doing this without a legitimate reason.

Gort
04-23-2012, 03:13 AM
Companies aren't out to exploit anyone? Haha, whatever you say cockstache.

then go live in Rwanda where you can be free of the "exploiters" you stupid dick smoker.

Gort
04-23-2012, 03:18 AM
Actually that's a bit inconsistent! People who received those vaccines were not actually wrong from getting them. Viruses like most living organisms adapt to survive. Which means the small pox back in the day is not the same small box now. It has mutated it's genome to survive! Sparing you the details of how it actually happens, the vaccines aren't always the problem. The problem is after a researcher discovers a cure for the diseases he is no longer funded meaning he loses his job. So the profit is in vaccine, and it's lobbyists that actually mess it up for everybody. Most companies (unless you work for the government) jobs are not that secure as you want to believe. So lobbyist take advantage of the companies.
But not to get all political I think stem cell therapy is awesome. It really assist in repairing your body and doesn't really improve strength or anything. It was a bit ridiculous how the last president banned it and cut funding TREMENDOUSLY on science which we are still pretty much struggling to get back on track (although it's getting better). AGAIN, I don't want to get political just take this post as an innocent young immunologist/geneticist just voicing his opinion!

Bush didn't ban it.

there are no restrictions on adult stem cell research.

Bush also allowed research on existing embryonic stem cells to continue.

what he stopped was the funding for and the creation of new embryonic stem cells because that actually requires the killing of a living being.

of course, this is all related to government funding. anybody can research anything they want using their own money.

so not to bring politics into it, but you did anyway and not even accurately.

chanesaw
04-23-2012, 04:57 AM
There is no longer any need to research embryonic stem cells. Scientists can now get stem cells from your adult stem cells, usually fibroblasts, that have the same pluripotency as embryonic. Induced pluripotent stem cells are better because they will not be recognized as foreign by the immune system (won't require immune suppressive drugs) and don't require killing an embryo. However they must be reprogrammed, cultured, and then partially induced to the precursor of the desired cell type. This cannot bet done in a couple of hours.

It is extremely important not to inject completely undifferentiated stem cells into your body. Some of the cells will differentiate into the correct tissue, but some will become something else (teratoma). For instance the patient could get hair or teeth in his joint. The only way this procedure makes sense is if adipose (fat tissue) and the cells in the joint share a common precursor that does not differentiate into something else.

That One Guy
04-23-2012, 05:02 AM
There is no longer any need to research embryonic stem cells. Scientists can now get stem cells from your adult stem cells, usually fibroblasts, that have the same pluripotency as embryonic. Induced pluripotent stem cells are better because they will not be recognized as foreign by the immune system (won't require immune suppressive drugs) and don't require killing an embryo. However they must be reprogrammed, cultured, and then partially induced to the precursor of the desired cell type. This cannot bet done in a couple of hours.

It is extremely important not to inject completely undifferentiated stem cells into your body. Some of the cells will differentiate into the correct tissue, but some will become something else (teratoma). For instance the patient could get hair or teeth in his joint. The only way this procedure makes sense is if adipose (fat tissue) and the cells in the joint share a common precursor that does not differentiate into something else.

So if one were to reduce your post to the level that you'd find on a Bubble Yum wrapper, is he limited to just fat possible in his knee since it came from fat?

Agamemnon
04-23-2012, 06:28 AM
you guys watch too many conspiracy movies.

without the advancements made by private pharmaceutical companies using their own money, your lives would all be shorter and more painful.

i honestly don't understand what has happened to reason and common sense anymore.

Here's some common sense for you:

1) Pharmaceutical companies exist to make a profit.

2) There is more profit to be made in long-term drug regimens that keep diseases under control than outright cures.

3) Pharmaceutical companies therefore do not try to develop actual cures for diseases.

Couldn't get much more "common sense" than that.

Kaylore
04-23-2012, 06:40 AM
Yeah because no money would be made on cures and vaccines to actual diseases. It wouldn't be a huge PR and profit boon for them to be the first to cure cancer. And they are all in collusion with each other, right? Just need to take some calcium and Aids will go away, right? ::)

Agamemnon
04-23-2012, 06:46 AM
Yeah because no money would be made on cures and vaccines to actual diseases. It wouldn't be a huge PR and profit boon for them to be the first to cure cancer. And they are all in collusion with each other, right? Just need to take some calcium and Aids will go away, right? ::)

You actually think there is a profit to be made in curing diseases? Especially compared to developing long-term treatments instead? Hilarious!

The naiveté of people never ceases to amuse me...

Gort
04-23-2012, 06:47 AM
Here's some common sense for you:

1) Pharmaceutical companies exist to make a profit.

2) There is more profit to be made in long-term drug regimens that keep diseases under control than outright cures.

3) Pharmaceutical companies therefore do not try to develop actual cures for diseases.

Couldn't get much more "common sense" than that.

except of course there is absolutely NO evidence to support your wild conspiracy theory. and there's plenty of evidence to show that you're off your rocker.

all sorts of cancers now have very high survival rates as a result of new medicines and treatments. the MMR vaccine has virtually eliminated childhood diseases which used to kill many children. then we have the classic examples of the smallpox and polio vaccines. we have flu shots to keep people from getting sick in the first place. etc. etc.

these pharmaceutical companies are not in the business of keeping people sick so that they can continue to sell them drugs. not every new drug is a miracle cure. sometimes the drugs help keep the diseases at bay until better drugs can be developed that will cure the disease. i'm sure the folks who are surviving on their current drugs are happy with the extra time they get, even if it means paying for the drugs that keep them alive. those profits are then used by the drug companies to continue their research on newer drugs. do you really think a couple of supposed greedy businessmen are sitting around some corporate boardroom deciding not to release cures? do you really think the researchers finding such cures would stick around at a company that refused to release the drugs that they found could cure diseases? come on. get real. what you're proposing is nonsense that can only be found in a Hollyweird movie.

Agamemnon
04-23-2012, 06:52 AM
these pharmaceutical companies are not in the business of keeping people sick so that they can continue to sell them drugs.

Really? What would happen to those companies if every disease was permanently cured? Answer that question, and the absurdity of your position should become clear.

Do you also believe that the oil corporations aren't opposed to alternative energy? Hilarious!

Edit: By the way, there is no solid evidence of either of our positions. I can't prove that they are purposely avoiding the development of cures for chronic and terminal diseases any more than you can prove otherwise. But my position is perfectly logical from a capitalist/corporate perspective of profit first, while yours requires a person to believe they might actually put healing people ahead of profits. Based on the history of modern corporations, only a complete fool would put his faith in their humanity winning out over their greed.

Bigdawg26
04-23-2012, 07:29 AM
Bush didn't ban it.

there are no restrictions on adult stem cell research.

Bush also allowed research on existing embryonic stem cells to continue.

what he stopped was the funding for and the creation of new embryonic stem cells because that actually requires the killing of a living being.

of course, this is all related to government funding. anybody can research anything they want using their own money.

so not to bring politics into it, but you did anyway and not even accurately.

Your right bush didn't ban stem cell research. He only limited it to I believe 3 or 5 researchers in which most of them were dead end anyways (gave up on stem cell research because they didn't receive the right results. Really they were doing it wrong).
Research is not that simple to where you can hold a bake sale and have enough money to start a project. I wish it was then we would be alot better at. But, It takes time, collaborations, amples and amples amount of data (you even have to prove alot before you even be considered to have funding). This is why government agencys like NIH, FDA, and USDA are there to give funding to people who will put accurate research beneficial to man kind. Lobbyist and people who are able to give you (and we are talking about hundreds of thousands if not millions) will give you funding only in their favor if even it's not 100%. As long as it works in their favor and can turn profit out of it they're good.

SportinOne
04-23-2012, 08:33 AM
if you want to live without vaccines or flourinated water or the benefits of modern medicine and pharmaceuticals, i'm sure you can find a nice spot in the Congo or Rwanda or Liberia where you'll be free from those "awful" things. your lifespan will also be about 40 years as well.

or, maybe we just continue to live here, where we were born, and we just don't use the things we consider to be bad for us. and maybe people like you could be okay with that?

houghtam
04-23-2012, 08:39 AM
or, maybe we just continue to live here, where we were born, and we just don't use the things we consider to be bad for us. and maybe people like you could be okay with that?

We're okay with it, we'll just continue to make fun of people who buy into pseudo-science. Unfortunately though it's not that simple. People who don't immunize their children are undermining group immunity. They deserve to be ridiculed and alienated.

chanesaw
04-23-2012, 09:18 AM
So if one were to reduce your post to the level that you'd find on a Bubble Yum wrapper, is he limited to just fat possible in his knee since it came from fat?

I don't know this doctor's entire procedure, and it is unlikely that he would make it available, but he needs to get the adult stem cells from fat back into the mesenchymal (MSC) stage before it could make a different tissue. MSCs can become a variety of tissues including bone, cartilage, muscle, and adipose. The article doesn't say if he treats the cells with any growth or transcription factor prior to injecting, or he relies solely on the new niche.

I am not a doctor, I merely have an MS in biology, but the single appointment seems to add undue risk. It would make more sense to me to extract the cells, induce them to a more multipotent state, partially induce differentiation to a common precursor, and ensure that only correctly differentiated cells are injected, followed by screenings for the correct structure.

I could be wrong, but I believe cells at the stage he is using can become either fibroblasts or adipose on their own, not transdifferentiate to cartilage. This is however a step in the right direction.

OrangeCrush2724
04-23-2012, 09:40 AM
Not trying to find a cure on purpose? And today's media coverage hasn't picked up anything on that? No one wants to be famous overnight and have their entire generation live a life of pure luxury from the financial benefit of curing something as simple as Psoriasis? Conspiracy theories are cool man, but it's just for entertainment.

As far as stem cells and other things, I use plasma cells and inject into different sites during my dental procedures. The healing is remarkably better and faster. It is also used in a lot of Orthopedic surgeries and has given tremendous/better results. Usually there are no or very little foreign substances added to plasma cells and your own plasma cells are injected into the site of injury. This is different than stem cells. However, I bet this is used in sports all the time.

alkemical
04-23-2012, 09:56 AM
Yeah because no money would be made on cures and vaccines to actual diseases. It wouldn't be a huge PR and profit boon for them to be the first to cure cancer. And they are all in collusion with each other, right? Just need to take some calcium and Aids will go away, right? ::)

How the IMF Cured AIDS (http://www.gregpalast.com/sell-the-lexus-burn-the-olive-treernglobalization-and-its-discontents/)

How the IMF Cured AIDS
The IMF and its sidekick, the World Bank, have lent a sticky helping hand to scores of nations. Take Tanzania. Today, in that African state, 1.3 million people are getting ready to die of AIDS. The IMF and World Bank have come to the rescue with a brilliant neoliberal solution: require Tanzania to charge for what were previously free hospital appointments. Since the Bank imposed this requirement, the number of patients treated in Dar es Salaam's three big public hospitals has dropped by 53 percent. The Bank's cure is working!

Lestat
04-23-2012, 10:24 AM
not really a performance enhancer when you use your own body's natural byproduct to promote healing. from the procedures that Tiger Woods had to Kobe and A-Rod to now looking at McClain and Maze.

it'd be different if it were a issue with infusing them with artificial or synthetic ingredients that can enhance the body then it'd be a performance enhancer.
as it stands now they're just recycling the body's natural process and furthering it.

broncosteven
04-23-2012, 10:30 AM
Former Alabama football players get stem cell injections from Gulf Shores doctor


Published: Sunday, April 22, 2012, 7:07 AM By Casandra Andrews, Press-Register




MOBILE, Alabama -- At the end of this past season with the Oakland Raiders, an aching Rolando McClain gave an assignment to his agent: Find out more about stem cell therapies for injuries, like other athletes are trying.

“I’ve been having two seasons of nagging pain in my knee,” the former University of Alabama standout said.

Not long afterward, McClain was on his way to Gulf Shores.

There, radiologist Jason R. Williams performed liposuction on McClain and then injected stem cells from the linebacker’s own fat cells into his knee and into the area of a high ankle sprain.

“It feels a lot better,” McClain said in an interview last week, adding that he’s working out four days a week with the Raiders, running, lifting weights, doing squats and even sprinting “with hardly any pain at all.”

About three months ago, Williams, 38, began the new procedure in which he injects patients -- two of them being McClain and former University of Alabama receiver Marquis Maze -- with their own stem cells in an effort to repair damaged joints and muscles.

“This is going to be the future of medicine,” said Williams, who owns Precision StemCell, which includes a diagnostic and interventional radiology practice in Gulf Shores.

Stem cells, sometimes called the body’s master cells, are precursor cells that develop into blood, bones and organs, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which regulates their use.

Their promise in medicine, according to many scientists and doctors, is that the cells have the potential to help and regenerate other cells.

While Williams’ treatments are considered investigational, he said, they meet FDA guidelines since the stem cells are collected from a patient’s fat tissue and administered back to that patient during the same procedure.


Because of their experimental nature, stem cell injections to remedy conditions such as damaged knee joints or injured muscles are not covered by insurance. A typical stem cell therapy with Williams costs about $15,000. The collection of the cells through liposuction, he said, makes up about half of the overall price.

Williams said he spent about four years researching various stem cell therapies, including those collected from bone marrow. He said that the adult stem cells derived from fat tissue seemed to bring fewer chances for complications.

Harvesting stem cells from a patient’s own fat removes the need to culture cells, Williams said, explaining that culturing stem cells can be a weeks-long process that may expose patients to risks such as infection.

In recent years, professional athletes such as Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning and New York Yankees pitcher Bartolo Colon, among dozens of others, have acknowledged seeking stem cell injections outside the U.S. to try to help heal injuries.


FDA urges caution

In January, the FDA issued a consumer warning about claims regarding stem cells.

In it, Stephanie Simek, deputy director of the FDA’s Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies, said that stem cells from bone marrow or blood are routinely used in transplant procedures to treat cancer and disorders of the blood and immune system.

The document cautioned consumers, however, to make sure that stem cell therapy treatments have been approved by the FDA or are being studied under a clinical investigation allowed to proceed by the agency.

“There is a potential safety risk when you put cells in an area where they are not performing the same biological function as they were when in their original location in the body,” Simek said.

Cells in a different environment may multiply, form tumors, or may migrate elsewhere in the body from the spot where they were placed, according to the FDA warning.

In March 2008, a group of pain management doctors published the first study of successful cartilage regeneration in a human knee using adult stem cells, although those cells were not derived from fat.


While several dozen clinical trials involving various forms of stem cell therapies are under way or have been announced around the world, few have included adult stem cells found in fat tissue.

Williams said that universities and research groups have been slow to move forward because research funding tends to steer toward new drug therapies.

He said that he is up front with his patients, telling them that results cannot be predicted.

“It might not work for everybody. There’s a lot of cases that we are taking on right now that have never really been done. It’s the type of thing that if it works, it will be monumental,” he said.

Williams said he feels it is safe to inject someone’s own fat cells back into his or her own body. “There’s been no evidence of problems,” he said.

He said that similar injections have been performed in Asian hospitals and clinics for several years.

Stem cell therapies also have been successfully used in veterinary medicine -- in horses, cats and dogs -- to treat everything from heart attacks to tendon and ligament damage.


How it works

Here’s how Williams said his stem cell therapy procedure works:

Once collected in a tube through liposuction, the fat tissue is processed to separate the adult stem cells. Those cells do not leave the container until being returned to the patient. Williams injects the minimally processed stem cells the same day -- about two hours later -- under computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance.

To give the greatest possible benefit, stem cells must be injected into the exact location of an injury, Williams said. When a doctor uses CT scans or an MRI for guidance, there’s a better chance of putting the cells in the correct location.

The results, so far, have been startling, Williams said: “I was expecting some improvement. They’ve got cartilage regrowth. It’s unbelievable to see those changes.”

During the 2012 BCS National Championship game against LSU, Marquis Maze almost returned a punt for a touchdown before partially tearing a hamstring. Television cameras captured Maze on the sideline, visibly shaken by the game-ending injury.

About a month ago, after talking to McClain and another of Williams’ patients, Mobile car dealership manager Mitch McConnell, Maze received a stem cell injection in his hamstring at the Gulf Shores clinic.

The 24-year old Maze said that the pain in his leg subsided in about two weeks. “I don’t feel any tightness in it,” he said last week, adding that he’s been running and working out daily as the NFL draft approaches.


A path to stem cell therapy

After earning a medical degree from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Louisiana, Williams began an internship in internal medicine at the University of South Alabama and a residency in radiology at USA.

After a few years, he took a leave of absence from USA to treat cancer patients that many other doctors wouldn’t with novel therapies such as cancer ablation from a practice he established in Gulf Shores in 2004.

He eventually returned to USA, completed his residency and took a job in Mississippi, becoming director of radiology for Northwest Regional Medical Center in Clarksdale.

In 2009, he opened an image-guided radiology clinic in Gulf Shores, recently renaming it Precision StemCell.

As he pored over ways to deliver stem cells to patients, he said, he became interested in the company Medi-Khan, with roots in Korea, because it offered a patented enclosed system for harvesting the adipose tissue.

Williams said that Medi-Khan staff members came to his office and taught him how to use the system.

Bob Hubbard, director of stem cell therapy at the clinic, and a former assistant basketball coach at the University of Alabama, received stem cell injections himself a few months ago to treat a torn ligament in his knee, among other issues.

“Within two weeks we actually had increased cartilage in my knee,” said Hubbard, a physician’s assistant before his career in coaching. “I think it’s absolutely a medical marvel and it’s going to change the way we practice medicine in this country.”





http://blog.al.com/live/2012/04/stem_cell_injections_offered_b.html

I have got to check this out!

Chris
04-23-2012, 10:57 AM
There is no longer any need to research embryonic stem cells. Scientists can now get stem cells from your adult stem cells, usually fibroblasts, that have the same pluripotency as embryonic. Induced pluripotent stem cells are better because they will not be recognized as foreign by the immune system (won't require immune suppressive drugs) and don't require killing an embryo. However they must be reprogrammed, cultured, and then partially induced to the precursor of the desired cell type. This cannot bet done in a couple of hours.

It is extremely important not to inject completely undifferentiated stem cells into your body. Some of the cells will differentiate into the correct tissue, but some will become something else (teratoma). For instance the patient could get hair or teeth in his joint. The only way this procedure makes sense is if adipose (fat tissue) and the cells in the joint share a common precursor that does not differentiate into something else.

Finally an explanation for why some Greek women have moustaches.

Agamemnon
04-23-2012, 12:18 PM
Not trying to find a cure on purpose? And today's media coverage hasn't picked up anything on that?

Hilarious!

houghtam
04-23-2012, 12:41 PM
Hilarious!

Way to add to the discussion.

That One Guy
04-23-2012, 12:57 PM
not really a performance enhancer when you use your own body's natural byproduct to promote healing. from the procedures that Tiger Woods had to Kobe and A-Rod to now looking at McClain and Maze.

it'd be different if it were a issue with infusing them with artificial or synthetic ingredients that can enhance the body then it'd be a performance enhancer.
as it stands now they're just recycling the body's natural process and furthering it.

But it's not natural, that's my issue. Until it's proven safe and approved, one guy could choose the operation while the other chooses not to based on the risks. Isn't that basically the reason PEDs are banned? Some could choose to suck up the risks and would then be at an advantage of those who choose not to. That's basically the definition of a performance enhancing drug.

houghtam
04-23-2012, 01:01 PM
But it's not natural, that's my issue. Until it's proven safe and approved, one guy could choose the operation while the other chooses not to based on the risks. Isn't that basically the reason PEDs are banned? Some could choose to suck up the risks and would then be at an advantage of those who choose not to. That's basically the definition of a performance enhancing drug.

Not sure I agree with you on this point. Surgeries in general are not "natural" when you get right down to it, and many of them have risks that come along with them.

That One Guy
04-23-2012, 01:06 PM
Not sure I agree with you on this point. Surgeries in general are not "natural" when you get right down to it, and many of them have risks that come along with them.

Yes, but some are more necessary than others. This one is entirely elective so as to speed up the healing process from what I've discerned. That's hardly necessary though not getting it definitely puts you at a disadvantage.

I just think it's perfectly in line with what I've understood HGH to do.

broncosteven
04-23-2012, 01:10 PM
Not sure I agree with you on this point. Surgeries in general are not "natural" when you get right down to it, and many of them have risks that come along with them.

I would love to find a way to regenerate the nerve(s) that were damaged that have kept me in chronic pain for over 4 years now that the surgery did not resolve.

houghtam
04-23-2012, 01:10 PM
Yes, but some are more necessary than others. This one is entirely elective so as to speed up the healing process from what I've discerned. That's hardly necessary though not getting it definitely puts you at a disadvantage.

I just think it's perfectly in line with what I've understood HGH to do.

Eating right helps the healing process, and that's entirely elective. Should they regulate that, too?

snowspot66
04-23-2012, 01:13 PM
Yes, but some are more necessary than others. This one is entirely elective so as to speed up the healing process from what I've discerned. That's hardly necessary though not getting it definitely puts you at a disadvantage.

I just think it's perfectly in line with what I've understood HGH to do.

Elective because it's not readily available. If it turns out to work as well as claimed it will become a pretty standard procedure I imagine. The fact that it is a surgery will help to limit abuse. It would be a violation of a doctor's code of ethics to perform this procedure without legitimate cause. Of course there are shady doctors but the vast majority take that oath very seriously. Since this is a surgical procedure it involves multiple doctors and/or other medical staff. The more people involved the fewer chances there are for misconduct.

That One Guy
04-23-2012, 01:38 PM
Eating right helps the healing process, and that's entirely elective. Should they regulate that, too?

One could reasonably opt out of this procedure because of the risks involved. Could one reasonably opt out of eating right because of risks?

I'm just stating my opinion here. No need to get silly trying to score imaginary points or something.

That One Guy
04-23-2012, 01:40 PM
Elective because it's not readily available. If it turns out to work as well as claimed it will become a pretty standard procedure I imagine. The fact that it is a surgery will help to limit abuse. It would be a violation of a doctor's code of ethics to perform this procedure without legitimate cause. Of course there are shady doctors but the vast majority take that oath very seriously. Since this is a surgical procedure it involves multiple doctors and/or other medical staff. The more people involved the fewer chances there are for misconduct.

The risk appears to be what happens to those tissues over time. As was mentioned in the thread, the possibility exists that they could become different things and cause different problems. Until those risks are properly evaluated and known, I think it just gives a person willing to blindly assume the risks a temporary advantage over those who choose not to.

Again, I'm not necessarily opposed to it but I think it is grey area.