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ClamChowdah
03-16-2012, 09:44 PM
As of yesterday.

Broncos: $40.0 million.
Bengals: $38.9 million.
Seahawks: $28.6 million.
Titans: $26.2 million.
Jaguars: $24.8 million.
49ers: $23.5 million.
Eagles: $22.3 million.
Bills: $22.2 million.
Browns: $21.6 million.
Chiefs: $21.4 million.
Buccaneers: $17.9 million.
Vikings: $18.8 million.
Rams: $14.6 million.
Chargers: $14.5 million.
Dolphins: $14.3 million.
Colts: $14.3 million.
Patriots: $13.6 million.
Lions: $13.3 million.
Bears: $12.8 million.
Jets: $12.7 million.
Redskins: $11.3 million.
Texans: $8.7 million.
Packers: $7.2 million.
Falcons: $6.0 million.
Steelers: $5.8 million.
Cowboys: $5.5 million.
Raiders: $5.0 million.
Ravens: $4.7 million.
Panthers: $3.1 million.
Saints: $3.0 million.
Giants: $2.3 million.
Cardinals: $448,000.

Houshyamama
03-16-2012, 09:50 PM
This message is hidden because ClamChowdah is on your ignore list.

HILife
03-16-2012, 09:56 PM
This message is hidden because ClamChowdah is on your ignore list.

x2

broncos-rock
03-16-2012, 09:57 PM
X3

ayjackson
03-16-2012, 10:00 PM
I see it fine. Thanks for the list.

baja
03-16-2012, 10:01 PM
As of yesterday.

Broncos: $40.0 million.
Bengals: $38.9 million.
Seahawks: $28.6 million.
Titans: $26.2 million.
Jaguars: $24.8 million.
49ers: $23.5 million.
Eagles: $22.3 million.
Bills: $22.2 million.
Browns: $21.6 million.
Chiefs: $21.4 million.
Buccaneers: $17.9 million.
Vikings: $18.8 million.
Rams: $14.6 million.
Chargers: $14.5 million.
Dolphins: $14.3 million.
Colts: $14.3 million.
Patriots: $13.6 million.
Lions: $13.3 million.
Bears: $12.8 million.
Jets: $12.7 million.
Redskins: $11.3 million.
Texans: $8.7 million.
Packers: $7.2 million.
Falcons: $6.0 million.
Steelers: $5.8 million.
Cowboys: $5.5 million.
Raiders: $5.0 million.
Ravens: $4.7 million.
Panthers: $3.1 million.
Saints: $3.0 million.
Giants: $2.3 million.
Cardinals: $448,000.

Someone please tell me how the Cardinals could have even been considered in the hunt for Manning???

Broncos_OTM
03-16-2012, 10:02 PM
Looks as though someone got over their depression quick... tool

broncswin
03-16-2012, 10:07 PM
I see it fine. Thanks for the list.

I see it fine too...this little biatch isn't worth putting on ignore...fook you Clam...and fook your listHa!

HILife
03-16-2012, 10:19 PM
The electromagnetic spectrum is the range of all possible frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.[1] The "electromagnetic spectrum" of an object is the characteristic distribution of electromagnetic radiation emitted or absorbed by that particular object.

The electromagnetic spectrum extends from low frequencies used for modern radio communication to gamma radiation at the short-wavelength (high-frequency) end, thereby covering wavelengths from thousands of kilometres down to a fraction of the size of an atom. It is for this reason that the electromagnetic spectrum is highly studied for spectroscopic purposes to characterize matter.[2] The limit for long wavelength is the size of the universe itself, while it is thought that the short wavelength limit is in the vicinity of the Planck length,[3] although in principle the spectrum is infinite and continuous.

HILife
03-16-2012, 10:19 PM
For most of history, light was the only know part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The ancient Greeks recognized that light traveled in straight lines and studied some of the properties of it, including reflection and refraction. Over the years the study of light continued and during the 16th and 17th centuries there were conflicting theories which regarded light as either a wave or a particle. It was first linked to electromagnetism in 1845 when Michael Faraday noticed that light responded to a magnetic field. The first discovery of electromagnetic waves other than light came in 1800, when William Herschel discovered infrared light. He was studying the temperature of different colours by moving a thermometer through light split by a prism. He noticed that the hottest temperature was beyond red. He theorized meant that there was 'light' that you could not see. The next year, Johann Ritter worked at the other end of spectrum and noticed that there were 'chemical rays' that behaved similar to, but were beyond, visible violet light rays. They were later renamed ultraviolet radiation. During the 1860's James Maxwell was studying electromagnetic field and realized that they traveled at around the speed of light. He developed four partial differential equations to explain this correlation. These equations predicted many frequencies of electromagnetic waves traveling at the speed of light. Attempting to prove Maxwell's equations, in 1886 Heinrich Hertz built an apparatus to generate and detect radio waves. He was able to observe that they traveled at the speed of light and could be both reflected and refracted. In a later experiment he similarly produced and measured microwaves. These new waves paved the way for inventions such as the wireless telegraph and the radio. In 1895 Wilhelm Röntgen noticed a new type of radiation emitted during an experiment. He called these x-rays and found they were able to travel through parts of the human body but were reflected by denser matter such as bones. Before long many uses were found for them in the field of medicine. The last portion of the electromagnetic spectrum was filled in with the discovery of gamma rays. In 1900 Paul Villard was studying radioactivity. He first thought they were particles similar to alpha and beta particles. However, in 1910 Ernest Rutherford measured their wave lengths and found that they were electromagnetic waves.

HILife
03-16-2012, 10:20 PM
Electromagnetic waves are typically described by any of the following three physical properties: the frequency f, wavelength λ, or photon energy E. Frequencies range from 2.4×1023 Hz (1 GeV gamma rays) down to the local plasma frequency of the ionized interstellar medium (~1 kHz). Wavelength is inversely proportional to the wave frequency,[2] so gamma rays have very short wavelengths that are fractions of the size of atoms, whereas wavelengths can be as long as the universe. Photon energy is directly proportional to the wave frequency, so gamma rays have the highest energy (around a billion electron volts) and radio waves have very low energy (around a femto electron volts). These relations are illustrated by the following equations:

f = \frac{c}{\lambda}, \quad\text{or}\quad f = \frac{E}{h}, \quad\text{or}\quad E=\frac{hc}{\lambda},

where:

c = 299,792,458 m/s is the speed of light in vacuum and
h = 6.62606896(33)×10−34 J s = 4.13566733(10)×10−15 eV s is Planck's constant.[7]

Whenever electromagnetic waves exist in a medium with matter, their wavelength is decreased. Wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, no matter what medium they are traveling through, are usually quoted in terms of the vacuum wavelength, although this is not always explicitly stated.

Generally, EM radiation is classified by wavelength into radio wave, microwave, terahertz (or sub-millimeter) radiation, infrared, the visible region we perceive as light, ultraviolet, X-rays and gamma rays. The behavior of EM radiation depends on its wavelength. When EM radiation interacts with single atoms and molecules, its behaviour also depends on the amount of energy per quantum (photon) it carries.

Spectroscopy can detect a much wider region of the EM spectrum than the visible range of 400 nm to 700 nm. A common laboratory spectroscope can detect wavelengths from 2 nm to 2500 nm. Detailed information about the physical properties of objects, gases, or even stars can be obtained from this type of device. Spectroscopes are widely used in astrophysics. For example, many hydrogen atoms emit a radio wave photon that has a wavelength of 21.12 cm. Also, frequencies of 30 Hz and below can be produced by and are important in the study of certain stellar nebulae[8] and frequencies as high as 2.9×1027 Hz have been detected from astrophysical sources.[9]

That One Guy
03-16-2012, 10:34 PM
Electromagnetic waves are typically described by any of the following three physical properties: the frequency f, wavelength λ, or photon energy E. Frequencies range from 2.4×1023 Hz (1 GeV gamma rays) down to the local plasma frequency of the ionized interstellar medium (~1 kHz). Wavelength is inversely proportional to the wave frequency,[2] so gamma rays have very short wavelengths that are fractions of the size of atoms, whereas wavelengths can be as long as the universe. Photon energy is directly proportional to the wave frequency, so gamma rays have the highest energy (around a billion electron volts) and radio waves have very low energy (around a femto electron volts). These relations are illustrated by the following equations:

f = \frac{c}{\lambda}, \quad\text{or}\quad f = \frac{E}{h}, \quad\text{or}\quad E=\frac{hc}{\lambda},



where:

c = 299,792,458 m/s is the speed of light in vacuum and
h = 6.62606896(33)×10−34 J s = 4.13566733(10)×10−15 eV s is Planck's constant.[7]

Whenever electromagnetic waves exist in a medium with matter, their wavelength is decreased. Wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, no matter what medium they are traveling through, are usually quoted in terms of the vacuum wavelength, although this is not always explicitly stated.

Generally, EM radiation is classified by wavelength into radio wave, microwave, terahertz (or sub-millimeter) radiation, infrared, the visible region we perceive as light, ultraviolet, X-rays and gamma rays. The behavior of EM radiation depends on its wavelength. When EM radiation interacts with single atoms and molecules, its behaviour also depends on the amount of energy per quantum (photon) it carries.

Spectroscopy can detect a much wider region of the EM spectrum than the visible range of 400 nm to 700 nm. A common laboratory spectroscope can detect wavelengths from 2 nm to 2500 nm. Detailed information about the physical properties of objects, gases, or even stars can be obtained from this type of device. Spectroscopes are widely used in astrophysics. For example, many hydrogen atoms emit a radio wave photon that has a wavelength of 21.12 cm. Also, frequencies of 30 Hz and below can be produced by and are important in the study of certain stellar nebulae[8] and frequencies as high as 2.9×1027 Hz have been detected from astrophysical sources.[9]

LOL

First ever light jack.

I had to learn the light spectrum freqs in gen chem back in the day. We couldn't have programmable calculators but I didn't want to learn something for one test and forget it so I just assigned letters to numbers 1-26 and put that into my calculator. I surely could've learned all the freqs in the time I spent going (18+5+4)-[low end]-[high end] for all the freqs or wavelengths. It sucked.

In short, I hate the light spectrum. I never forgave it.

That One Guy
03-16-2012, 10:35 PM
And then, after typing that, I notice that it was an EM jack and not a light jack.

Damnit. Light got me again...

OBF1
03-16-2012, 11:00 PM
This message is hidden because ClamChowdah is on your ignore list.

bombay
03-16-2012, 11:21 PM
The tired old patsies are like the first runner up in a mrs. massachusetts comtest for the last decade or so.

Punisher
03-16-2012, 11:25 PM
Giants > Pats

cutthemdown
03-17-2012, 12:00 AM
The electromagnetic spectrum is the range of all possible frequencies of electromagnetic radiation.[1] The "electromagnetic spectrum" of an object is the characteristic distribution of electromagnetic radiation emitted or absorbed by that particular object.

The electromagnetic spectrum extends from low frequencies used for modern radio communication to gamma radiation at the short-wavelength (high-frequency) end, thereby covering wavelengths from thousands of kilometres down to a fraction of the size of an atom. It is for this reason that the electromagnetic spectrum is highly studied for spectroscopic purposes to characterize matter.[2] The limit for long wavelength is the size of the universe itself, while it is thought that the short wavelength limit is in the vicinity of the Planck length,[3] although in principle the spectrum is infinite and continuous.

Holy science jack?

DENVERDUI55
03-17-2012, 12:10 AM
Someone please tell me how the Cardinals could have even been considered in the hunt for Manning???

You can always sign anyone you want. Couple cuts and reworked deals. You should know this we were master of it during sb runs but it caught up to us in early 2000's.

baja
03-17-2012, 12:56 AM
You can always sign anyone you want. Couple cuts and reworked deals. You should know this we were master of it during sb runs but it caught up to us in early 2000's.

Ya but they are 20 million dollars short for 1 Player.

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
03-17-2012, 12:57 AM
bob aint you a bit old for these games .
also seems like Denver is wanting to give PM waaay too much money damn for that much we could buy the no 1 pick it seems like . to me its disgusting how this team is slobbering over manning along with the rest of the nfl do they not have any pride

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
03-17-2012, 12:59 AM
also bob will you just cut it out already cmon everyone with half a brain knows it is you .
my grandma knows its you and shes dead.
it isnt Halloween yet

canadianbroncosfan
03-17-2012, 12:59 AM
As of yesterday.

Broncos: $40.0 million.
Bengals: $38.9 million.
Seahawks: $28.6 million.
Titans: $26.2 million.
Jaguars: $24.8 million.
49ers: $23.5 million.
Eagles: $22.3 million.
Bills: $22.2 million.
Browns: $21.6 million.
Chiefs: $21.4 million.
Buccaneers: $17.9 million.
Vikings: $18.8 million.
Rams: $14.6 million.
Chargers: $14.5 million.
Dolphins: $14.3 million.
Colts: $14.3 million.
Patriots: $13.6 million.
Lions: $13.3 million.
Bears: $12.8 million.
Jets: $12.7 million.
Redskins: $11.3 million.
Texans: $8.7 million.
Packers: $7.2 million.
Falcons: $6.0 million.
Steelers: $5.8 million.
Cowboys: $5.5 million.
Raiders: $5.0 million.
Ravens: $4.7 million.
Panthers: $3.1 million.
Saints: $3.0 million.
Giants: $2.3 million.
Cardinals: $448,000.

Huh, look at that Chowdah. Spending does win Championships.

Ratboy
03-17-2012, 01:06 AM
This message is hidden because ClamChowdah is on your ignore list.

TomServo
03-17-2012, 02:00 AM
so hows that SB thing going since the pats got caught cheating?

Steve Prefontaine
03-17-2012, 03:18 AM
"YOU WILL BE GRONKED"

Celebrating Super Bowl losses by dancing naked on a bum ankle?

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
03-17-2012, 11:27 AM
so bob are you now a pat fan til the chiefs start looking good ? and to the uninformed bob is chowdah

CEH
03-17-2012, 01:08 PM
Calling the Broncos Donkeys pretty much tells us this is not an NE fan but a troll who hangs around under different names. Gee some ppl flat out ignorant

Bronco Rob
03-17-2012, 01:12 PM
Calling the Broncos Donkeys pretty much tells us this is not an NE fan but a troll who hangs around under different names. Gee some ppl flat out ignorant



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