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Turd_Ferguson
12-08-2011, 09:00 AM
At $250 apiece, thatís $7 million of revenue in less than three hours. 250,000 shares are available overall, which means the Packers can (and probably will) make $62.5 million from the stock sale by the time itís over.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/12/07/packers-non-stock-stock-flies-off-the-shelves/

Personally I find this to be about the dumbest thing I have ever seen. I have a buddy thats a Packers fan and he ponied up $250 bucks for a piece of paper telling him he owns part of the team, which he clearly does not. This stock does not gain or lose value, which doesn't matter, because you can never sell it.

It got me thinking though... Should the Broncos start selling Tebow stock for say $500 a pop? Tebow fans probably pay twice as much as what the Packers stock is selling for wouldn't they?

alkemical
12-08-2011, 09:06 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowie_Bonds

Bowie Bonds are asset-backed securities of current and future revenues of the 25 albums (287 songs) that David Bowie recorded before 1990.

Issued in 1997, the bonds were bought for US$55 million by the Prudential Insurance Company[1]. The bonds paid an interest rate of 7.9% and had an average life of ten years,[2] a higher rate of return than a 10-year Treasury note (at the time, 6.37%).[1] Royalties from the 25 albums generated the cash flow that secured the bonds' interest payments.[3] Prudential also received guarantees from Bowie's label, EMI Records, which had recently signed a $30m deal with Bowie.[1]

By forfeiting ten years worth of royalties, David Bowie was able to receive a payment of US$55 million up front. Bowie used this income to buy songs owned by his former manager.[2] Bowie's combined catalog of albums covered by this agreement sold more than 1 million copies annually at the time of the agreement.[1]

The Bowie Bond issuance was perhaps the first instance of intellectual property rights securitization. The securitization of the collections of other artists, such as James Brown, Ashford & Simpson and the Isley Brothers, later followed. These Bonds are named Pullman Bonds after David Pullman, the banker who pushed the original Bowie deal.

In March 2004, Moody's Investors Service lowered the bonds from an A3 rating (the seventh highest rating) to Baa3, one notch above junk status. This downgrade was prompted by lower-than-expected revenue "due to weakness in sales for recorded music." A downgrade to an unnamed company that guarantees the issue was also cited as a reason for the downgrade.

The success of Apple's iTunes and other legal online music retailers has led to a renewed interest in Bowie and Pullman Bonds.[4]

SonOfLe-loLang
12-08-2011, 09:11 AM
People spend money on "dumb" stuff all the time. But its a cool souvenier. Technically, anyone who buys it is a partial owner

Shotgun Willie
12-08-2011, 09:13 AM
Personally I find this to be about the dumbest thing I have ever seen. I have a buddy thats a Packers fan and he ponied up $250 bucks for a piece of paper telling him he owns part of the team, which he clearly does not. This stock does not gain or lose value, which doesn't matter, because you can never sell it.

People here have admitted to spending more than that for jerseys of guys who are no longer on the team.....and may have only even been on the team for a year or two.

Technically, these at least still have the exact same value years from now (the team will buy them back for $250) whereas those jerseys either have no monetary value or next to no monetary value after the players leave. Plus they do give the stockholder the right to vote for the next board of directors. So there is tangible value here.

Meck77
12-08-2011, 09:20 AM
Are those shares entitled to dividends? They should if they are actually marketing them as real stock.

TailgateNut
12-08-2011, 09:22 AM
Do they get access to all the free cheese they can consume?

Turd_Ferguson
12-08-2011, 09:23 AM
People here have admitted to spending more than that for jerseys of guys who are no longer on the team.....and may have only even been on the team for a year or two.

Technically, these at least still have the exact same value years from now (the team will buy them back for $250) whereas those jerseys either have no monetary value or next to no monetary value after the players leave. Plus they do give the stockholder the right to vote for the next board of directors. So there is tangible value here.

See I heard if you bought one you were invited to the annual meeting but, did not get to vote on anything.

Turd_Ferguson
12-08-2011, 09:26 AM
Do they get access to all the free cheese they can consume?

Yes, but only in curd form.

Shotgun Willie
12-08-2011, 09:26 AM
Are those shares entitled to dividends? They should if they are actually marketing them as real stock.

It's structured as a non-profit corporation, so no.

http://www.packers.com/community/shareholders.html

Shotgun Willie
12-08-2011, 09:27 AM
See I heard if you bought one you were invited to the annual meeting but, did not get to vote on anything.

That would be wrong. It clearly indicates in their bylaws that they do:

http://www.packersgameday.com/stock/packer_stock_bylaws.htm

Turd_Ferguson
12-08-2011, 09:57 AM
That would be wrong. It clearly indicates in their bylaws that they do:

http://www.packersgameday.com/stock/packer_stock_bylaws.htm

You are correct sir, this is my punishment for being stupid enough to believe anything that comes out of Doug Gotlieb's mouth.