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Taco John
11-25-2011, 10:26 AM
http://i.imgur.com/8LBt7.jpg

Blart
11-25-2011, 03:21 PM
Republicans and Democrats agree on something!!

They should be allowed to order any website accused of illegal distribution of intellectual property to be shut down by all American Internet service providers. Is one of our nation's 6 media conglomerates upset at a copy & pasted article? Goodbye orangemane. Occupywallst.org causing a bit too much dissent? Someone posted a link to piratebay in their comments, bye bye!

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/16/opinion/firewall-law-could-infringe-on-free-speech.html?_r=2

MrPeepers
11-25-2011, 06:18 PM
http://americancensorship.org/

easy link for the clickies

Crushaholic
11-25-2011, 10:17 PM
::)What a WONDERFUL use of Congress' time. It's not like we have a debt problem to solve, or anything...

Rolandftw
11-25-2011, 10:18 PM
I can't see them blocking sites like youtube.

Stuff like firstrowsports, I wouldn't be surprised with them trying to block.

Course the problem is that laws in the United States are not necessarily the same in other countries where a lot of this stuff gets streamed (at least on the servers)

theAPAOps5
11-25-2011, 10:19 PM
::)What a WONDERFUL use of Congress' time. It's not like we have a debt problem to solve, or anything...

Hopefully they start a super committee on this. Then we would be fine.

Archer81
11-26-2011, 12:22 AM
How about we leave the internet as it is, and stop adopting policies of such freedom loving places like Iran, China, North Korea, Saudi Arabia and Russia?

Or maybe the corporations that are pushing for this should actually realize that $17.99 for a cd or $30 for a blueray dvd is a bit much when you have competition on the internet...

:Broncos:

elsid13
11-26-2011, 04:20 AM
It would be possible for the mane to be shut down if someone post a link to a stream of the game. This is just a bad law.

eddie mac
11-26-2011, 04:22 AM
I've heard they're going to ban the use of the word Freedom in the States. Any truth in that???

Garcia Bronco
11-26-2011, 07:52 AM
Just another thing the boomers are going to **** up.

Doggcow
11-26-2011, 09:42 AM
Canada looks great right about now.

brncs_fan
11-26-2011, 11:36 AM
http://www.globalresearch.ca/coverStoryPictures/14249.jpg

RhymesayersDU
11-26-2011, 12:05 PM
Canada looks great right about now.

LOL

That One Guy
11-26-2011, 01:19 PM
How about we leave the internet as it is, and stop adopting policies of such freedom loving places like Iran, China, North Korea, Saudi Arabia and Russia?

Or maybe the corporations that are pushing for this should actually realize that $17.99 for a cd or $30 for a blueray dvd is a bit much when you have competition on the internet...

:Broncos:

I don't want to fully take this WRP level but this is the kind of stuff you get when you ask a government to manage every aspect of your life. The country needs a mindset change and these are merely symptoms of the problem, not the entirety of it.

broncolife
11-26-2011, 01:33 PM
Oh Crap. I better load up on all the porn I can now.

Taco John
11-26-2011, 04:21 PM
It's interesting to me to see how the free market is responding to this regulatory threat from the government and it's corporate backers:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2011/11/23/wary-of-sopa-reddit-users-aim-to-build-a-new-censorship-free-internet/

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
11-27-2011, 05:01 PM
shouldn't someone from a web site go on the talk show circuit and spread the word about how bad this bill is

elsid13
11-27-2011, 05:59 PM
I don't want to fully take this WRP level but this is the kind of stuff you get when you ask a government to manage every aspect of your life. The country needs a mindset change and these are merely symptoms of the problem, not the entirety of it.

You do realize that push behind this bill comes from the entertainment industry (music and movie) and their attempt to gain control of the distribution of that media. Legalization is just the tool they are using today. But like most things when short term monetary gains are the motivation, it ****s everyone.

Archer81
11-27-2011, 06:02 PM
You do realize that push behind this bill comes from the entertainment industry (music and movie) and their attempt to gain control of the distribution of that media. Legalization is just the tool they are using today. But like most things when short term monetary gains are the motivation, it ****s everyone.

Agreed. There is no such thing as limited censorship, and that is what this bill is.


:Broncos:

elsid13
11-27-2011, 06:11 PM
Agreed. There is no such thing as limited censorship, and that is what this bill is.


:Broncos:


And I will tell you, I doubt the folks voting on it understand what this means. The are the some guys that are still buying CDs from Best Buy. And most of the staffers aren't much better.

Archer81
11-27-2011, 06:21 PM
And I will tell you, I doubt the folks voting on it understand what this means. The are the some guys that are still buying CDs from Best Buy. And most of the staffers aren't much better.


Inside the Beltway common sense dies. If I were in a position like congress is, I would respectfully tell the film and music industries to **** off. More important things then protecting inflated costs of luxury items in two frivilous industries.


:Broncos:

elsid13
11-27-2011, 06:25 PM
Inside the Beltway common sense dies. If I were in a position like congress is, I would respectfully tell the film and music industries to **** off. More important things then protecting inflated costs of luxury items in two frivilous industries.


:Broncos:

Common sense doesn't die that stupid myth. It is just a different environment and pace then what folks are used to outside the beltway. They are bombard by more people feeding them tons of information that usually contradict every other piece of information they get from someone else. It not an easy job and there is more pressure then you can understand unless you live it.

That One Guy
11-27-2011, 06:38 PM
Common sense doesn't die that stupid myth. It is just a different environment and pace then what folks are used to outside the beltway. They are bombard by more people feeding them tons of information that usually contradict every other piece of information they get from someone else. It not an easy job and there is more pressure then you can understand unless you live it.

That's what happens when you try to micromanage every facet of life.

If they're getting bombarded with too much info, tell them to stop worrying about the dealings of major league sports and worry about their other problems. If it's still too much, tell them to let the entertainment industry figure out their own protection methods. If it's STILL too much, we can find more to cut.

Government is constantly trying to find a way to extend their fingers into anything they can. Everyone wants as much power as possible. If they can't handle the power, they need to stop trying to finagle more.

hambone13
11-27-2011, 06:42 PM
How about we leave the internet as it is, and stop adopting policies of such freedom loving places like Iran, China, North Korea, Saudi Arabia and Russia?

Or maybe the corporations that are pushing for this should actually realize that $17.99 for a cd or $30 for a blueray dvd is a bit much when you have competition on the internet...

:Broncos:

Precisely. Any censorship is bad censorship. Not to mention it puts the government further up our asses around everything in general.

alkemical
11-28-2011, 07:41 AM
Thanks for the sticky on this TJ.

Archer81
11-28-2011, 10:56 AM
Common sense doesn't die that stupid myth. It is just a different environment and pace then what folks are used to outside the beltway. They are bombard by more people feeding them tons of information that usually contradict every other piece of information they get from someone else. It not an easy job and there is more pressure then you can understand unless you live it.


It can. Inside the Beltway it not only dies, its brought back to life then killed again. The laws they write (like Pizza is a vegetable) just to fit it into a regulatory law is the definition of a lack of common sense.

As for this particular bill...there is no such thing as a little censorship. This bill should be voted down, and anything regarding curtailing the internet to protect profits for a frivilous industry should never be considered.

:Broncos:

alkemical
12-05-2011, 08:24 AM
Swiss gov't study: downloading leads to sales, so we're keeping it legal
by Cory Doctorow

The Swiss government commissioned a study on the impact of copyright-infringing downloading. The independent study concluded that downloaders use the money they spend to buy more legitimate entertainment products. So they've concluded to maintain Switzerland's extant copyright law, which makes downloading for personal use legal. It's a rare victory for evidence-based policy in a world dominated by shrill assertions of lost jobs and revenue, backed by funny-number "statistics" from industry-commissioned researchers.

The report states that around a third of Swiss citizens over 15 years old download pirated music, movies and games from the Internet. However, these people don’t spend less money as a result because the budgets they reserve for entertainment are fairly constant. This means that downloading is mostly complementary.

The other side of piracy, based on the Dutch study, is that downloaders are reported to be more frequent visitors to concerts, and game downloaders actually bought more games than those who didn’t. And in the music industry, lesser-know bands profit most from the sampling effect of file-sharing.

The Swiss report then goes on to review several of the repressive anti-piracy laws and regulations that have been implemented in other countries recently, such as the three-strikes Hadopi law in France. According to the report 12 million was spent on Hadopi in France this year, a figure the Swiss deem too high.

The report further states that it is questionable whether a three-strikes law would be legal in the first place, as the UN’s Human Rights Council labeled Internet access a human right. The Council specifically argued that Hadopi is a disproportionate law that should be repealed.

https://torrentfreak.com/swiss-govt-downloading-movies-and-music-will-stay-legal-111202/

http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/t-F8JHBh1u4/swiss-govt-study-downloadin.html

That One Guy
12-05-2011, 08:29 AM
My argument has always been that the things I download, I usually would never buy. Either I download it to hear it (if it's new) or for old time's sake (if it's old) but if forced to pay, it's just not that important.

Where I would have issue is with the second part of that. Yes, we might spend it on something else but no we aren't likely spending it on music. I don't think this viewpoint would satiate the recording industry. I can see how it wouldn't make a difference from a government perspective.

alkemical
12-05-2011, 08:36 AM
My argument has always been that the things I download, I usually would never buy. Either I download it to hear it (if it's new) or for old time's sake (if it's old) but if forced to pay, it's just not that important.

Where I would have issue is with the second part of that. Yes, we might spend it on something else but no we aren't likely spending it on music. I don't think this viewpoint would satiate the recording industry. I can see how it wouldn't make a difference from a government perspective.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/apr/21/study-finds-pirates-buy-more-music

Study finds pirates 10 times more likely to buy music

According to research, those who download 'free' music are also the industry's largest audience for digital sales


The Norwegian study looked at almost 2,000 online music users, all over the age of 15. Researchers found that those who downloaded "free" music – whether from lawful or seedy sources – were also 10 times more likely to pay for music. This would make music pirates the industry's largest audience for digital sales.

Wisely, the study did not rely on music pirates' honesty. Researchers asked music buyers to prove that they had proof of purchase.

That One Guy
12-05-2011, 08:41 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/apr/21/study-finds-pirates-buy-more-music

Study finds pirates 10 times more likely to buy music

According to research, those who download 'free' music are also the industry's largest audience for digital sales

Ahh... wow. Just doesn't make sense. If you can download for free, why buy? Would this frequency change if music sharing were more popular so the lesser songs were more readily available?

Interesting though. I figured, like me, the people spent the money but not on music.

alkemical
12-05-2011, 09:28 AM
Ahh... wow. Just doesn't make sense. If you can download for free, why buy? Would this frequency change if music sharing were more popular so the lesser songs were more readily available?

Interesting though. I figured, like me, the people spent the money but not on music.

I think it shows that people do appreciate, and do support artists and products they enjoy.

What groups like RIAA don't understand is that the easier you make it for people to purchase what they like and want - the more people will do so. Example:

To download a song from iTunes or something like that - it's still $1+ per song. Well, why? Why is the pricing the same for a piece of digital content, that doesn't have:

resources used to make a case, disc, etc?


Why isn't a song, say more like $.50?

This bill is about information control, not about copyright.

That One Guy
12-05-2011, 10:04 AM
I think it shows that people do appreciate, and do support artists and products they enjoy.

What groups like RIAA don't understand is that the easier you make it for people to purchase what they like and want - the more people will do so. Example:

To download a song from iTunes or something like that - it's still $1+ per song. Well, why? Why is the pricing the same for a piece of digital content, that doesn't have:

resources used to make a case, disc, etc?


Why isn't a song, say more like $.50?

This bill is about information control, not about copyright.

I hate to think we're entering into an era of intentional information control. I'd like to think it's more reactionary copyright control that will inevitably be cited and used outside it's original intents.

Can't disagree with anything you say, though.

alkemical
12-05-2011, 10:08 AM
I hate to think we're entering into an era of intentional information control. I'd like to think it's more reactionary copyright control that will inevitably be cited and used outside it's original intents.

Can't disagree with anything you say, though.

Have you ever heard of "Filter Bubbles"?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filter_bubble

A filter bubble is a concept developed by Internet activist Eli Pariser in his book by the same name to describe a phenomenon in which websites use algorithms to selectively guess what information a user would like to see based on information about the user like location, past click behaviour and search history. As a result websites tend to show only information which agrees with the user's past viewpoint. Prime examples are Google's personalized search results and Facebook's personalized news stream. According to Pariser, users get less exposure to conflicting viewpoints and are isolated intellectually in their own informational bubble. Pariser related an example in which one user searched Google for "BP" and got investment news about British Petroleum while another searcher got information about the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and that the two search results pages were "strikingly different."[1][2][3][4] The bubble effect may have negative implications for civic discourse, according to Pariser, but there are contrasting views suggesting the effect is minimal.[4]


http://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles.html

As web companies strive to tailor their services (including news and search results) to our personal tastes, there's a dangerous unintended consequence: We get trapped in a "filter bubble" and don't get exposed to information that could challenge or broaden our worldview. Eli Pariser argues powerfully that this will ultimately prove to be bad for us and bad for democracy.

Bronco_Beerslug
12-21-2011, 03:52 AM
I don't want to fully take this WRP level but this is the kind of stuff you get when you ask a government to manage every aspect of your life. The country needs a mindset change and these are merely symptoms of the problem, not the entirety of it.
It's people with money who use the government as their tools to get what they want, in this case. And they have a LOT of money, hard to fight against them and their financial resources.

That's why supporting organizations like EFF (https://www.eff.org/) makes sense.

alkemical
12-21-2011, 05:45 AM
Don't you get it...

You're the enemy now. (http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/270068/20111220/ndaa-2012-sopa-target-tea-party-wall.htm)


It's not a country, it's not a terrorist group, it's now the individual that is the threat.

..

elsid13
12-21-2011, 07:04 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/anti-piracy-bill-creates-fear-aggressive-justice-dept-042807115.html

A little news on this subject.

tsiguy96
12-21-2011, 07:13 AM
companies actively fighting this law:
ebay, yahoo, google, facebook, zynga, mozilla, reddit, twitter, aol etc

will find the link that lists them all, but i dont see any possible way this law can pass with 75% of the american internet companies against it.

BroncoFanatic
12-21-2011, 07:25 AM
2 Firefox AddIns to get around this, FWIW...

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/desopa/

http://torrentfreak.com/the-pirate-bay-dancing-add-on-kills-dns-and-ip-blockades-111130/

alkemical
12-21-2011, 07:25 AM
companies actively fighting this law:
ebay, yahoo, google, facebook, zynga, mozilla, reddit, twitter, aol etc

will find the link that lists them all, but i dont see any possible way this law can pass with 75% of the american internet companies against it.

I hate RIAA and all this crap.

alkemical
12-21-2011, 10:48 AM
kelsium: SOPA Emergency IP list anglophonic: Here’s how to access your favorite sites in the...

kelsium:

SOPA Emergency IP list

anglophonic:

Here’s how to access your favorite sites in the event of a DNS takedown

tumblr.com 174.121.194.34
wikipedia.org 208.80.152.201

# News
bbc.co.uk 212.58.241.131
aljazeera.com 198.78.201.252

# Social media
reddit.com 72.247.244.88
imgur.com 173.231.140.219
google.com 74.125.157.99
youtube.com 74.125.65.91
yahoo.com 98.137.149.56
hotmail.com 65.55.72.135
bing.com 65.55.175.254
digg.com 64.191.203.30
theonion.com 97.107.137.164
hush.com 65.39.178.43
gamespot.com 216.239.113.172
ign.com 69.10.25.46
cracked.com 98.124.248.77
sidereel.com 144.198.29.112
github.com 207.97.227.239

# Torrent sites
thepiratebay.org 194.71.107.15
mininova.com 80.94.76.5
btjunkie.com 93.158.65.211
demonoid.com 62.149.24.66
demonoid.me 62.149.24.67

# Social networking
facebook.com 69.171.224.11
twitter.com 199.59.149.230
tumblr.com 174.121.194.34
livejournal.com 209.200.154.225
dreamwidth.org 69.174.244.50
deviantart.com 199.15.160.100


# Live Streaming Content
stickam.com 67.201.54.151
blogtv.com 84.22.170.149
justin.tv 199.9.249.21
chatroulette.com 184.173.141.231
omegle.com 97.107.132.144
own3d.tv 208.94.146.80
megavideo.com 174.140.154.32

# Television
gorillavid.com 178.17.165.74
videoweed.com 91.220.176.248
novamov.com 91.220.176.248
tvlinks.com 208.223.219.206
1channel.com 208.87.33.151

# Shopping
amazon.com 72.21.211.176
newegg.com 216.52.208.187
frys.com 209.31.22.39

# File Sharing
mediafire.com 205.196.120.13
megaupload.com 174.140.154.20
fileshare.com 208.87.33.151
multiupload.com 95.211.149.7
uploading.com 195.191.207.40
warez-bb.org 31.7.57.13
hotfile.com 199.7.177.218
gamespy.com 69.10.25.46
what.cd 67.21.232.223
warez.ag 178.162.238.136
putlocker.com 89.238.130.247
uploaded.to 95.211.143.200
dropbox.com 199.47.217.179
pastebin.com 69.65.13.216

Added LJ and DW.

Here’s a tip for the do-it-yourself crowd: Go to your computer’s Start menu, and either go to “run” or just search for “cmd.” Open it up, and type in “ping [website address],” like so:

image

Once you have the IP for a website, all you really need to do is enter it like you would a normal URL and hit enter/press go. Typing in “208.85.240.231” should bring you to the front page of AO3, for example, just as typing “174.121.194.34/dashboard” should bring you straight to your Tumblr dashboard. Since we’re obviously bracing for the worst case scenario which would involve you not being able to access Tumblr regularly, you should, like, save this list, I guess.

added deviantArt

EVERYONE REBLOG THIS

Sincere thanks. Please keep adding on.

alkemical
12-22-2011, 06:39 AM
http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/71FKNbW3Xjw/sopa-and-everyday-americans.html

Alec Macgillivray (Twitter General Counsel, former Google attorney, Berkman Fellow) has a great post explaining how SOPA might impact everyday Americans:

The harm that does to ordinary, non-infringing users is best described via a hypothetical user: Abe. Abe has never even so much as breathed on a company’s copyright but he does many of the things typical of Internet users today. He stores the photos of his children, now three and six years old, online at PickUpShelf* so that he doesn’t have to worry about maintaining backups. He is a teacher and keeps copies of his classes accessible for his students via another service called SunStream that makes streaming audio and video easy. He engages frequently in conversation in several online communities and has developed a hard-won reputation and following on a discussion host called SpeakFree. And, of course, he has a blog called “Abe’s Truths” that is hosted on a site called NewLeaflet. He has never infringed on any copyright and each of the entities charged with enforcing SOPA know that he hasn’t.

And yet, none of that matters. Under SOPA, every single one of the services that Abe uses can be obliterated from his view without him having any remedy. Abe may wake up one morning and not be able to access any of his photos of his children. Neither he, nor his students, would be able to access any of his lectures. His trove of smart online discussions would likewise evaporate and he wouldn’t even be able to complain about it on his blog. And, in every case, he has absolutely no power to try to regain access. That may sound far-fetched but under SOPA, all that needs to happen for this scenario to come true is for the Attorney General to decide that some part of PickUpShelf, SunStream, SpeakFree and NewLeaflet would be copyright infringement in the US. If a court agrees, and with no guarantee of an adversarial proceeding that seems very likely, the entire site is “disappeared” from the US internet. When that happens Abe has NO remedy. None. No way of getting the photos of his kids other than leaving the United States for a country that doesn’t have overly broad censorship laws.

BroncoFanatic
12-22-2011, 07:31 AM
2 Firefox AddIns to get around this, FWIW...

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/desopa/

http://torrentfreak.com/the-pirate-bay-dancing-add-on-kills-dns-and-ip-blockades-111130/

Holy carp, the deSopa AddIn has already been pulled. Way to cave Mozilla. If anyone comes across it, please post

tsiguy96
12-22-2011, 07:52 AM
this level of censorship is truly scary. and the fact that it has bipartisan support is even scarier. old guys making laws without truly understanding the consequences.

BroncoFanatic
12-22-2011, 07:54 AM
this level of censorship is truly scary. and the fact that it has bipartisan support is even scarier. old guys making laws without truly understanding the consequences.

I have no doubt that many of them do understand the consequences, and push forward with it anyway

i4jelway7
12-22-2011, 09:49 AM
Holy carp, the deSopa AddIn has already been pulled. Way to cave Mozilla. If anyone comes across it, please post

the deSopa addin worked for me

BroncoFanatic
12-22-2011, 09:59 AM
the deSopa addin worked for me

Ah, excellent. It looks like author was just getting an updated version together :ouwknow:

alkemical
12-28-2011, 05:50 AM
http://www.disinfo.com/2011/12/life-would-suck-if-sopa-passes/

Comic creator David Rees, previously renowned for Get Your War On, is back with a series titled Get Your Censor On, an attempt to convey what life may be like under the much-feared Stop Online Piracy Act. If we don’t get our acts together and work to prevent SOPA from coming to fruition in Congress, you could find yourself having conversations such as these in the near future:

http://disinfo.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/burning.jpg

Bronx33
12-28-2011, 05:07 PM
keep voting them in and this is what you get.

Scarface
12-30-2011, 06:26 PM
Why We Must Stop SOPA
http://lewrockwell.com/rep2/stop-sopa.html

Atwater 27
01-02-2012, 06:10 PM
<IFRAME style="POSITION: absolute; WIDTH: 10px; HEIGHT: 10px; TOP: -9999em" id=twttrHubFrame tabIndex=0 src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets/hub.1324331373.html" frameBorder=0 allowTransparency scrolling=no></IFRAME>I'll be a naysayer....

-In the decade since peer-to-peer (p2p) file-sharing site Napster emerged in 1999, music sales in the U.S. have dropped 47 percent, from $14.6 billion to $7.7 billion.
-From 2004 through 2009 alone, approximately 30 billion songs were illegally downloaded on file-sharing networks.
-NPD reports that only 37 percent of music acquired by U.S. consumers in 2009 was paid for.
-Frontier Economics recently estimated (http://www.iccwbo.org/uploadedFiles/BASCAP/Pages/Global%20Impacts%20-%20Final.pdf) that U.S. Internet users annually consume between $7 and $20 billion worth of digitally pirated recorded music.
-According to the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (http://riaa.org/blog.php?content_selector=How_Digital_Piracy_Harms _Everyone), the digital theft of music, movies and copyrighted content takes up huge amounts of Internet bandwidth – 24 percent globally, and 17.5 percent in the U.S.
-Digital storage locker downloads constitute 7 percent of all Internet traffic, while 91 percent of the links found on them were for copyrighted material, and 10 percent of those links were to music specifically, according to a 2011 Envisional study (http://documents.envisional.com/docs/Envisional-Internet_Usage-Jan2011.pdf).
While the music business has increased its digital revenues by 1,000 percent from 2004 to 2010, digital music theft has been a major factor behind the overall global market decline of around 31 percent in the same period. And although use of peer-to-peer sites has flattened during recent years, other forms of digital theft are emerging, most notably digital storage lockers used to distribute copyrighted music.

http://www.riaa.com/faq.php

For the single movie on which they had data, they estimate that piracy directly destroyed $40 million in box office revenue. Overall, the film grossed approximately $61 million or around $600/pirate source. (7)



Assuming that De Vany and Wall’s data is representative of a typical movie with typical levels of piracy which seems reasonable to me, it’s possible that 40% of box office revenue of a typical film is being lost to piracy.


If the film industry takes in roughly $10 billion per year in box office sales, we could estimate that piracy costs the film industry $3-4 billion annually, which is a range constructed from both academic and MPAA research. The primary mechanism of this lost revenue is through box office sales rather than DVD sales.
http://www.quora.com/How-much-income-does-the-film-industry-lose-to-piracy

That's just music and film. I am not saying we should pass this bill in its current form, but clearly something needs to be done about billions of dollars in theft. And all you boys livin in yer momma's basement that think it is your right to steal/download **** you haven't paid for... just think if you were the guys who got stolen from. And this is coming from someone who has a general disdain for the entertainment industry.

alkemical
01-03-2012, 06:03 AM
<IFRAME style="POSITION: absolute; WIDTH: 10px; HEIGHT: 10px; TOP: -9999em" id=twttrHubFrame tabIndex=0 src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets/hub.1324331373.html" frameBorder=0 allowTransparency scrolling=no></IFRAME>I'll be a naysayer....

-In the decade since peer-to-peer (p2p) file-sharing site Napster emerged in 1999, music sales in the U.S. have dropped 47 percent, from $14.6 billion to $7.7 billion.
-From 2004 through 2009 alone, approximately 30 billion songs were illegally downloaded on file-sharing networks.
-NPD reports that only 37 percent of music acquired by U.S. consumers in 2009 was paid for.
-Frontier Economics recently estimated (http://www.iccwbo.org/uploadedFiles/BASCAP/Pages/Global%20Impacts%20-%20Final.pdf) that U.S. Internet users annually consume between $7 and $20 billion worth of digitally pirated recorded music.
-According to the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (http://riaa.org/blog.php?content_selector=How_Digital_Piracy_Harms _Everyone), the digital theft of music, movies and copyrighted content takes up huge amounts of Internet bandwidth – 24 percent globally, and 17.5 percent in the U.S.
-Digital storage locker downloads constitute 7 percent of all Internet traffic, while 91 percent of the links found on them were for copyrighted material, and 10 percent of those links were to music specifically, according to a 2011 Envisional study (http://documents.envisional.com/docs/Envisional-Internet_Usage-Jan2011.pdf).
While the music business has increased its digital revenues by 1,000 percent from 2004 to 2010, digital music theft has been a major factor behind the overall global market decline of around 31 percent in the same period. And although use of peer-to-peer sites has flattened during recent years, other forms of digital theft are emerging, most notably digital storage lockers used to distribute copyrighted music.

http://www.riaa.com/faq.php

For the single movie on which they had data, they estimate that piracy directly destroyed $40 million in box office revenue. Overall, the film grossed approximately $61 million or around $600/pirate source. (7)



Assuming that De Vany and Wall’s data is representative of a typical movie with typical levels of piracy which seems reasonable to me, it’s possible that 40% of box office revenue of a typical film is being lost to piracy.


If the film industry takes in roughly $10 billion per year in box office sales, we could estimate that piracy costs the film industry $3-4 billion annually, which is a range constructed from both academic and MPAA research. The primary mechanism of this lost revenue is through box office sales rather than DVD sales.
http://www.quora.com/How-much-income-does-the-film-industry-lose-to-piracy

That's just music and film. I am not saying we should pass this bill in its current form, but clearly something needs to be done about billions of dollars in theft. And all you boys livin in yer momma's basement that think it is your right to steal/download **** you haven't paid for... just think if you were the guys who got stolen from. And this is coming from someone who has a general disdain for the entertainment industry.



http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20110327/22561013640/did-limewire-shutdown-increase-music-sales.shtml
http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/apr/21/study-finds-pirates-buy-more-music

The Norwegian study looked at almost 2,000 online music users, all over the age of 15. Researchers found that those who downloaded "free" music – whether from lawful or seedy sources – were also 10 times more likely to pay for music. This would make music pirates the industry's largest audience for digital sales.

Wisely, the study did not rely on music pirates' honesty. Researchers asked music buyers to prove that they had proof of purchase.


/end

Atwater 27
01-03-2012, 06:08 AM
It's pretty simple actually. It is illegal to steal music and movies, and those laws should be enforced.

/end

alkemical
01-03-2012, 06:11 AM
It's pretty simple actually. It is illegal to steal music and movies, and those laws should be enforced.

/end

More sales are generated due to the fact people can sample what they want before they purchase. RIAA's just mad because they* make ****ty movies and ****ty music and wonder why people don't spend $.

Bronco_Beerslug
01-03-2012, 06:13 AM
Researchers found that those who downloaded "free" music – whether from lawful or seedy sources – were also 10 times more likely to pay for music. This would make music pirates the industry's largest audience for digital sales.

Pretty much says it all.

alkemical
01-03-2012, 06:15 AM
Pretty much says it all.

...and they BUY!!!

This is the same thing that happened with Tapes and VCR's. Microsoft realized the key to market dominance was picking your battle with pirates.

Atwater 27
01-03-2012, 04:49 PM
More sales are generated due to the fact people can sample what they want before they purchase. RIAA's just mad because they* make ****ty movies and ****ty music and wonder why people don't spend $.

You can sample **** on Amazon and itunes and pandora and netflix.

So what part of stealing do you not have a problem with again, since you dodged?

RhymesayersDU
01-03-2012, 06:07 PM
People who defend illegal downloading are always hilarious.

Illegal downloading is stealing. It is. No internet rhetoric or false logic is going to change that.

With that said, do I do it? Absolutely. I buy very little music these days. A few particular artists here and there.

I liken it to jaywalking. People jaywalk all the time, even though it's against the law. But there are certain laws we choose to ignore, and hope for the best. For me personally, and millions of others, this is the same thing.

But you'll never hear me trying to convince people that it's OK or that it's not stealing. It is what it is.

Bronco_Beerslug
01-03-2012, 06:12 PM
...and they BUY!!!

This is the same thing that happened with Tapes and VCR's. Microsoft realized the key to market dominance was picking your battle with pirates.

Exactly! Microsoft starting "leaking" their software to get feedback on it years ago when they realized the "pirates" would actually help them increase sales.

alkemical
01-04-2012, 05:31 AM
You can sample **** on Amazon and itunes and pandora and netflix.

So what part of stealing do you not have a problem with again, since you dodged?

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/btl/everybody-pirates-riaa-homeland-security-caught-downloading-torrents/65670

Do as i say, not as I do.

You don't even understand the content of this bill. Do you realize that you couldn't do a cover song and post it on youtube? Then, if someone linked to it here - the OM would get black listed, thus you wouldn't be able to get "here".

alkemical
01-04-2012, 05:34 AM
Exactly! Microsoft starting "leaking" their software to get feedback on it years ago when they realized the "pirates" would actually help them increase sales.

http://www.teleread.com/copy-right/louis-c-k-s-drm-free-5-comedy-special-earns-1-million-in-12-days/

Louis C.K.’s DRM-free $5 comedy special earns $1 million in 12 days

alkemical
01-04-2012, 05:41 AM
People who defend illegal downloading are always hilarious.

Illegal downloading is stealing. It is. No internet rhetoric or false logic is going to change that.

With that said, do I do it? Absolutely. I buy very little music these days. A few particular artists here and there.

I liken it to jaywalking. People jaywalk all the time, even though it's against the law. But there are certain laws we choose to ignore, and hope for the best. For me personally, and millions of others, this is the same thing.

But you'll never hear me trying to convince people that it's OK or that it's not stealing. It is what it is.

Maybe that's where I'm different. I still purchase content for things that I value "purchasable" if you will:

I have purchased most of the catalog of BRMC due to downloading a few songs and buying Howl. (great album).

If I wouldn't have downloaded half of the album "It still moves" by My Morning Jacket - I wouldn't have purchased 3 albums.

So, maybe there are people like you. But i have also cited sources where studies involving proof of purchase back up that "pirates", often purchase more content.

Even Metallica realized this. :)

This isn't defending STEALING - this is defending free enterprise. I don't think having the Orangemane blocked, due to someone posting a cover song their are singing is really a good idea.

Atwater 27
01-04-2012, 06:35 AM
http://www.zdnet.com/blog/btl/everybody-pirates-riaa-homeland-security-caught-downloading-torrents/65670

Do as i say, not as I do.

You don't even understand the content of this bill. Do you realize that you couldn't do a cover song and post it on youtube? Then, if someone linked to it here - the OM would get black listed, thus you wouldn't be able to get "here".

Are you effing blind? Did you not see my original post saying I don't like the bill in its original form, but something needs to be done?

Atwater 27
01-04-2012, 06:38 AM
Illegal downloading is stealing. It is. No internet rhetoric or false logic is going to change that.


You got rhetoric and false logic right. It's really funny to watch the creative ways people try to spin/justify/rationalize stealing.

alkemical
01-04-2012, 07:03 AM
Are you effing blind? Did you not see my original post saying I don't like the bill in its original form, but something needs to be done?

Something needs done.

This is something

Therefore, something was done.

tsiguy96
01-04-2012, 07:36 AM
You got rhetoric and false logic right. It's really funny to watch the creative ways people try to spin/justify/rationalize stealing.

just curious how many people in this thread are talking about this because they want to continue downloading stuff free. i bet the answer is not as many as yo think. some people actually care about individual liberty and the government not controlling everything we do say and have access to, and if you are gonna stick your head in the sand and say ohhhh ok this bill is fine, there is no helping you.

alkemical
01-04-2012, 07:46 AM
just curious how many people in this thread are talking about this because they want to continue downloading stuff free. i bet the answer is not as many as yo think. some people actually care about individual liberty and the government not controlling everything we do say and have access to, and if you are gonna stick your head in the sand and say ohhhh ok this bill is fine, there is no helping you.

That's the rub. I am not embracing stealing - I just think that in the long run - things like SOPA do more to kill creativity and reduce marketshare. I'd rather have to deal with a little theft, than grind everything to a halt.

tsiguy96
01-04-2012, 07:50 AM
the bigger issue, and i cant believe i have to explain this because every link in this thread is about this, is the potential ramifications that come with this law is the govt has the ability to shut down EVERYONE for essentially ANY reason. no courts, no trials, nothing.

alkemical
01-04-2012, 07:54 AM
the bigger issue, and i cant believe i have to explain this because every link in this thread is about this, is the potential ramifications that come with this law is the govt has the ability to shut down EVERYONE for essentially ANY reason. no courts, no trials, nothing.

Well, that's the major concern as an overall for myself also. SOPA is a perfect example of lobbyist legislation that's passed, due to the inve$tment given to politicians.

This & the NDAA are terrible pieces of legislation.

Atwater 27
01-04-2012, 04:08 PM
Anything google is against is a potentially good thing. Cue the deliciously ironic defense of a massive bully corporation in 3, 2, 1....

tsiguy96
01-04-2012, 06:07 PM
Anything google is against is a potentially good thing. Cue the deliciously ironic defense of a massive bully corporation in 3, 2, 1....

whenever you lose an argument, do you ALWAYS just post random unrelated snippets or change the subject, or just about this topic?

Atwater 27
01-04-2012, 06:26 PM
Anything google is against is a potentially good thing. Cue the deliciously ironic defense of a massive bully corporation in 3, 2, 1....

As I was saying...

alkemical
01-05-2012, 07:25 AM
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120104/04545217274/cato-institute-digs-into-mpaas-own-research-to-show-that-sopa-wouldnt-save-single-net-job.shtml

The Cato institute's dug deep into the MPAA's funny piracy accounting: "In IPI-land, when a movie studio makes $10 selling a DVD to a Canadian, and then gives $7 to the company that manufactured the DVD and $2 to the guy who shipped it to Canada, society has benefitted by $10+$7+$2=$19. Yet some simple math shows that this is nonsense: the studio is $1 richer, the trucker is $2, and the manufacturer is $7. Shockingly enough, that adds up to $10. What each participant cares about is his profits, not his revenues."

Ratboy
01-17-2012, 10:41 PM
Why is OrangeMane not blacked out?

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
01-18-2012, 01:42 AM
Why is OrangeMane not blacked out?
good question .why isnt it ?

BowlenBall
01-18-2012, 02:04 AM
People who defend illegal downloading are always hilarious.

Illegal downloading is stealing. It is. No internet rhetoric or false logic is going to change that.

With that said, do I do it? Absolutely. I buy very little music these days. A few particular artists here and there.

I liken it to jaywalking. People jaywalk all the time, even though it's against the law. But there are certain laws we choose to ignore, and hope for the best. For me personally, and millions of others, this is the same thing.

But you'll never hear me trying to convince people that it's OK or that it's not stealing. It is what it is.

Did you personally take that picture in your avatar? If you didn't, the Orange Mane could be shut down permanently because it, under the provisions of the SOPA and PIPA bills.

The point is that these laws give waaaaaaaaaaaay too much power to the government, and could be used as a means of selectively-applied censorship. The fact that it's even up for a vote is shocking and frightening.

Fedaykin
01-18-2012, 06:31 AM
If these laws go through, it will destroy the internet. It's that simple.

Almost every site (big or small) on the internet links so something that infringes copyright (or other IP). The mane has a large amount of infringing content -- from avatars to posters copy&pasting entire articles into posts.

These bills have nothing whatsoever to do with combating copyright infringement. It's an attempt to convert the internet into what corporations want: something they control.

Who do you think will survive a SOPA challenge? Twitter or The Mane?

Fedaykin
01-18-2012, 06:32 AM
good question .why isnt it ?

Excellent question indeed.

alkemical
01-18-2012, 06:45 AM
If these laws go through, it will destroy the internet. It's that simple.

Almost every site (big or small) on the internet links so something that infringes copyright (or other IP). The mane has a large amount of infringing content -- from avatars to posters copy&pasting entire articles into posts.

These bills have nothing whatsoever to do with combating copyright infringement. It's an attempt to convert the internet into what corporations want: something they control.

Who do you think will survive a SOPA challenge? Twitter or The Mane?

It's so unamerican - i don't understand how people support it.

Archer81
01-18-2012, 11:53 AM
It's so unamerican - i don't understand how people support it.


Consider the name of the bill. "Stop Online Piracy Act". Anyone who gives just a cursory look at the name will think huh, stopping Online Piracy is a good thing (and it is). They will not go any further or put any more thought into it. But it's been said before, this and the other bill are **** legislation that confers way too much authority over a medium that should remain as is.

:Broncos:

alkemical
01-18-2012, 11:56 AM
I contacted my reps over lunchtime today.

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
01-18-2012, 12:44 PM
disappointing, om is still up today, guy with glasses site is down craig list also but floatation device boobs. com is still up

alkemical
01-19-2012, 08:11 AM
http://www.opencongress.org/wiki/Protect_IP_Act_Senate_whip_count

http://gizmodo.com/5877440/pipa-support-collapses-and-heres-a-full-list-of-the-senators-who-newly-oppose-it

Connecticut Bronco Fan
01-19-2012, 12:04 PM
http://d3j5vwomefv46c.cloudfront.net/photos/large/498585131.jpg?Expires=1327003936&Key-Pair-Id=APKAIYVGSUJFNRFZBBTA&Signature=cKkA5DbKaLjQUgLmmCTkq34luAFZS~WxxS~8NIkL nFBvr2WkleULS7Dk8ZZOc1qdGQL5-lkANjMBSwhjN~yFahMl1TaZ-HT7EaNoQKEE1b~KkTRQQ7x~N2egRPheWF4Wa12~r9vOE9RbC66 nC-M3MUrI4lddk8pcM5P-WfqrbIQ_

Bronco Yoda
01-20-2012, 02:29 AM
easy to understand info on SOPA

http://www.khanacademy.org/video/sopa-and-pipa?playlist=American+Civics

btw, great site for the whole family

BroncoBuff
01-20-2012, 09:50 PM
VICTORY! Congress shelves SOPA/PIPA indefinitely ..


Congress puts brakes on anti-piracy bills
By Jasmin Melvin
WASHINGTON | Sat Jan 21, 2012 12:01am EST

(Reuters) - Lawmakers stopped anti-piracy legislation in its tracks on Friday, delivering a stunning win for Internet companies that staged an unprecedented online protest this week to kill the previously fast-moving bills.

Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid said he would postpone a critical vote that had been scheduled for January 24 "in light of recent events."

Lamar Smith, the Republican chairman of the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee, followed suit, saying his panel would delay action on similar legislation until there is wider agreement on the issue.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/01/21/us-usa-congress-internet-idUSTRE80J10X20120121

lonestar
01-21-2012, 12:52 AM
How many morons voted for laws only to find out later what was in them..

Obamacare

Patriot act

as two of the prime examples..

From what I have read neither of the bills SOPA and Pipa should be passed in present form..

BroncoBuff
01-21-2012, 03:12 AM
http://cdn.pocket-lint.com/images/DPmt/wikipedia-record-numbers-sopa-black-out-1.jpg?20120119-114454


The Power of Black.

BroncoBuff
01-21-2012, 04:25 AM
From what I have read neither of the bills SOPA and Pipa should be passed in present form..

Online piracy is a serious problem no doubt - even a national security issue - but these law wouldn't help much. Sure, casual users would not see the blocked sites immediately, but sooner or later everybody would. 10 years ago the MPAA movie industry rolled out their "solution" to piracy, the encoded DVD copy protection thing, a big deal. But less than one week later there were t-shirts for sale with the code crack text printed on the front :~ohyah!:

Wikipedia and Craigslist are incredible services ... the 6th and 9th most visited sites in the US. But they have just 30 and 35 employees. How tf can they police what's posted?

Play2win
01-21-2012, 04:02 PM
Wikipedia and Craigslist are incredible services ... the 6th and 9th most visited sites in the US. But they have just 30 and 35 employees. How tf can they police what's posted?

Think about that for a second. That's pretty ****ing amazing.

Roll the time machine back 60 years and tell somebody that, it would blow their freaking mind.

lonestar
01-21-2012, 06:06 PM
Online piracy is a serious problem no doubt - even a national security issue - but these law wouldn't help much. Sure, casual users would not see the blocked sites immediately, but sooner or later everybody would. 10 years ago the MPAA movie industry rolled out their "solution" to piracy, the encoded DVD copy protection thing, a big deal. But less than one week later there were t-shirts for sale with the code crack text printed on the front :~ohyah!:

Wikipedia and Craigslist are incredible services ... the 6th and 9th most visited sites in the US. But they have just 30 and 35 employees. How tf can they police what's posted?

As I said the morons in Washington are bowing down to the industry and doing stop gap crap..

teh only way to stop it IS enforce the exsiting laws and if that means sanctions on a country that is doing this so be it..

but then no one in the white house has big enough balls to do that..

BroncoBuff
01-23-2012, 08:56 AM
no one in the white house has big enough balls to do that..

Good point ... we really should have elected Hillary. If she gave one of her balls to Obama, they'd both have two.

Garcia Bronco
01-23-2012, 09:00 AM
Good point ... we really should have elected Hillary. If she gave one of her balls to Obama, they'd both have two.

In retrospect, it would have been the best choice.

alkemical
01-24-2012, 06:18 AM
http://www.disinfo.com/2012/01/motion-picture-industry-threatens-politicians/

From the sickening department at Techdirt:

Reinforcing the fact that Chris Dodd really does not get what’s happening, and showing just how disgustingly corrupt the MPAA relationship is with politicians, Chris Dodd went on Fox News to explicitly threaten politicians who accept MPAA campaign donations that they’d better pass Hollywood’s favorite legislation… or else:

“Those who count on quote ‘Hollywood’ for support need to understand that this industry is watching very carefully who’s going to stand up for them when their job is at stake. Don’t ask me to write a check for you when you think your job is at risk and then don’t pay any attention to me when my job is at stake,”

alkemical
01-24-2012, 06:18 AM
http://www.disinfo.com/2012/01/the-freakonomics-of-hollywoods-piracy-claims/

The Freakonomics dudes have called BS on Hollywood’s piracy claims. Adrianne Jeffries reports for BetaBeat:

Anti-piracy rhetoric holds that online piracy is a devastating force on the U.S. economy, responsible for the theft of between $200 billion and $250 billion per year and the loss of 750,000 good American jobs. “These numbers seem truly dire: a $250 billion per year loss would be almost $800 for every man, woman, and child in America. And 750,000 jobs – that’s twice the number of those employed in the entire motion picture industry in 2010,” write the economists over at Freakonomics.

But those numbers are wrong, the authors say, citing a breakdown by the Cato Institute’s Julian Sanchez.

In 2010, the Government Accountability Office released a report noting that these figures “cannot be substantiated or traced back to an underlying data source or methodology,” which is polite government-speak for “these figures were made up out of thin air.”

More recently, the Institute for Policy Innovation (IPI) placed the number at $58 billion; but that reporter is methodologically flawed, Mr. Sanchez and tech journalist Tim Lee have deconstructed, and is guilty of double-counting with results that “swell the estimate of piracy losses considerably.”…

[continues at BetaBeat (http://www.betabeat.com/2012/01/23/freakonomics-piracy-costs-the-economy-200-b-a-year-these-figures-were-made-up-out-of-thin-air/)]

alkemical
01-24-2012, 06:24 AM
http://www.disinfo.com/2012/01/lots-of-illegal-downloading-occurring-at-the-nbc-sony-pictures-fox-offices/


http://disinfo.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/universal-bust.jpg

Lots Of Illegal Downloading Occurring At The NBC, Sony Pictures, Fox Offices

From the pot-calling-the-kettle-black department, via TorrentFreak:

A few days ago we wrote about a new website that exposes what people behind an IP-address have downloaded on BitTorrent.

Armed with the IP-ranges of major Hollywood studios we decided to find out what they’ve been downloading. As expected, it didn’t take us long before we found BitTorrent ‘pirates’ at several leading entertainment industry companies. Yes, these are the same companies who want to disconnect people from the Internet after they’ve been caught sharing copyrighted material.

First up is Sony Pictures Entertainment. This single IP-address alone a wide variety of music and movies have been downloaded. And this is probably just the tip of the iceberg, as YouHaveDownloaded only tracks only a small percentage of all public BitTorrent downloads.

Another Hollywood studio where it’s not uncommon to download music, TV-shows and movies is NBC Universal. The employee(s) behind one of the IP-addresses at the Fort Lauderdale office in Florida downloaded the first season of ‘Game of Thrones,’ some trance music, a DVD of ‘Cowboys and Aliens’, and much more.

alkemical
01-24-2012, 06:29 AM
http://www.disinfo.com/2012/01/sopa-author-is-a-copyright-violator/

SOPA Author Is A Copyright Violator

Posted by JacobSloan on January 19, 2012

Vice notes that many of the congress members supporting SOPA/PIPA perhaps need to do a bit of inner soul searching, as they themselves have websites with copyright violations. That includes Lamar Smith of Texas, the author of SOPA, whose website background is a photo (likely lifted from Flickr) by someone named DJ Schulte, who does not receive credit or a link as he should have:

http://disinfo.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/lamar1.jpg

BroncoFanatic
01-24-2012, 07:23 AM
VICTORY! Congress shelves SOPA/PIPA indefinitely ..


Not so...like Congress always does, they just declare it dead, then wait until people stop paying attention (which they always seem to do)

http://www.activistpost.com/2012/01/sopa-and-pipa-fully-alive-and-new-bill.html

Archer81
01-24-2012, 10:41 AM
Response I got from Michael Bennett, Senator from Colorado...

Dear Chris:

<STYLE type=text/css>#AOLMsgPart_1_65420c6b-2dd7-4f9f-b2d0-b508dedd0837 td{color: black;} #AOLMsgPart_1_65420c6b-2dd7-4f9f-b2d0-b508dedd0837 .par_58469BDF2E6079BB8525798E0056852E_2 { font-family: sans-serif; color: black; font-size: 10pt; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;} </STYLE>Thank you for contacting me regarding S.968, the Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property (PROTECT IP) Act. I appreciate hearing from you.

Let me begin by saying that honoring intellectual property rights is vital to our economy. Every incident of stolen intellectual property costs American businesses billions of dollars and results in the loss of thousands of jobs through copyright infringement and the sale of counterfeit goods.

The Internet has revolutionized the way we communicate, has sped the proliferation of ideas and products and grown into the world’s most integral marketplace. As a free place for expression and commerce, the Internet is a representation of what is best about American ingenuity. Unfortunately there is a disturbingly large number of criminals who take advantage of this forum by stealing and illegally selling intellectual property. Many of these individuals do not even live in this country. And current law is inadequate to address the problem of offshore rogue pirates exploiting the creativity of Americans. I support finding a commonsense solution to this threat to American innovation.

As you may know, the PROTECT IP Act was introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy of Vermont on May 5, 2011. This legislation would authorize the Attorney General and victimized American companies to seek legal action to prevent the pirating of intellectual property. While no monetary damages are authorized in the bill, a federal court order could require U.S. companies to take steps to discontinue their relationships with foreign rogue sites. The bill’s reach is limited to those foreign sites “dedicated to infringing activities” that have no significant use other than to violate U.S. intellectual property laws.

The PROTECT IP Act received unanimous support from the Senate Judiciary Committee. It now awaits consideration by the full Senate. I initially cosponsored S.968 after noting the support of business groups such as Microsoft and the National Association of Manufacturers, worker organizations such as the AFL-CIO, and law enforcement organizations such as the Fraternal Order of Police. But upon hearing the legitimate and understandable concerns of Coloradans that this legislation could have unintended consequences — such as chilling Internet commerce, potentially leading to excessive litigation and running the risk of causing unexpected logistical problems online — I determined that the wisest course of action was to push the Senate to pull back, return t o the drawing board, reconvene stakeholders and start afresh.

You may be interested to know that on January 20, 2012, a pending procedural vote in the full Senate on the PROTECT IP Act was canceled. This was the right thing to do. I would have opposed moving forward with this legislation.

I value the input of fellow Coloradans in considering the wide variety of important issues and legislative initiatives that come before the Senate. I hope you will continue to inform me of your thoughts and concerns.

For more information about my priorities as a U.S. Senator, I invite you to visit my website at http://bennet.senate.gov/ (http://bennet.senate.gov/). Again, thank you for contacting me.
<STYLE type=text/css>#AOLMsgPart_1_65420c6b-2dd7-4f9f-b2d0-b508dedd0837 td{color: black;} #AOLMsgPart_1_65420c6b-2dd7-4f9f-b2d0-b508dedd0837 .par_58469BDF2E6079BB8525798E0056852E_4 { font-family: sans-serif; color: black; font-size: 10pt; font-weight: normal; text-decoration: none;} </STYLE>

Sincerely,

Michael Bennet
United States Senator

...

:Broncos:

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
01-26-2012, 10:14 PM
they will never stop now Europe is considering a law like that
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Counterfeiting_Trade_Agreement
so now the internet people in the USA have to help Europe out now

BroncoFanatic
01-27-2012, 06:19 AM
they will never stop now Europe is considering a law like that
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Counterfeiting_Trade_Agreement
so now the internet people in the USA have to help Europe out now

According to numerous reports, Obama signed ACTA in the fall
http://www.webpronews.com/president-obama-doesnt-support-sopa-but-signs-acta-2012-01

Now...if this is the case, Obama bypassed the requirement that all treaties go through Senate ratification. This is the very definition of tyranny people.

Scumbags from both parties do it. We The People need to pull our heads out of our asses and stop voting for these establishment stooges, they are destroying our liberties.

alkemical
01-27-2012, 07:16 AM
According to numerous reports, Obama signed ACTA in the fall
http://www.webpronews.com/president-obama-doesnt-support-sopa-but-signs-acta-2012-01

Now...if this is the case, Obama bypassed the requirement that all treaties go through Senate ratification. This is the very definition of tyranny people.

Scumbags from both parties do it. We The People need to pull our heads out of our asses and stop voting for these establishment stooges, they are destroying our liberties.


I have little trust in most people to do the heavy lifting required. It's sort of a ****ty state of affairs in some regard, isn't it?

We want more freedom, but most people can't even handle the bit they have.

How do we change the culture?

BroncoFanatic
01-27-2012, 07:22 AM
I have little trust in most people to do the heavy lifting required. It's sort of a ****ty state of affairs in some regard, isn't it?

We want more freedom, but most people can't even handle the bit they have.

How do we change the culture?

The culture will change, one way or the other. I'd wish people would get involved and informed, but it seems the majority look to government as the solution, rather than the enormous problem that it is. SOPA is just one small example of that.

Change will happen, but it's gonna hurt.

alkemical
01-27-2012, 07:26 AM
The culture will change, one way or the other. I'd wish people would get involved and informed, but it seems the majority look to government as the solution, rather than the enormous problem that it is. SOPA is just one small example of that.

Change will happen, but it's gonna hurt.

Oh, I am with you on the "pain" side of it. The problem is, pain = growth also. Growing is hard. Right now, we need to grow the F up.

You want to know what happened, why we stopped being so awesome:

We stopped making ****. I don't mean just manufacturing jobs - I mean we don't make **** anymore. We just buy it.

Even people that go to craft shows as vendors buy "homemade crafts" from china from distributors and sell them as "homemade". Lazy f'n asses.

How many people garden these days? How many people even understand their relationship to food/production?

Instead - we consume - and then bitch about why nothing is made here.

Who's to blame..."WE THE PEOPLE" are - but the fact is -

Nobody wants to really admit it - it's much easier to be a narcissist and blame others.

"There's no manufacturing jobs, but look at this **** i bought from Wal*Mart!"

BroncoFanatic
01-27-2012, 08:23 AM
Oh, I am with you on the "pain" side of it. The problem is, pain = growth also. Growing is hard. Right now, we need to grow the F up.

You want to know what happened, why we stopped being so awesome:

We stopped making ****. I don't mean just manufacturing jobs - I mean we don't make **** anymore. We just buy it.

Even people that go to craft shows as vendors buy "homemade crafts" from china from distributors and sell them as "homemade". Lazy f'n asses.

How many people garden these days? How many people even understand their relationship to food/production?

Instead - we consume - and then b**** about why nothing is made here.

Who's to blame..."WE THE PEOPLE" are - but the fact is -

Nobody wants to really admit it - it's much easier to be a narcissist and blame others.

"There's no manufacturing jobs, but look at this **** i bought from Wal*Mart!"

Yep. One of my biggest pet peeves is how people know every contestant on American Idol, but has no clue what their government is up to. Frackin idiots

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
01-27-2012, 10:23 AM
the gov of the world shure love to suppress freedom it seems like.
now theres one thing left thats totally free and they cant wait to suppress that now via SOPA/PIPA /ACTA.
also if anyone deems your avatar to be copyrighted or that video clip or the video of your child taking his/her first steps and theres anything that can be remotely copyrighted the web site hosting your video will be punished . without due process or appeal. in other words your rights are now non existent.

alkemical
01-30-2012, 10:14 AM
“Greetings, world. We are Anonymous.

We are here to reveal to you an arcane legal trick, which will be used to take away your freedom starting in June 2012.

Your governments have been secretly negotiating the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement or ACTA as it is known.

The title is misleading.

The true goal of ACTA is to crush the internet, as we know it, and to take away your freedom.

We and other good people of this Earth have been pointing out a major problem with ACTA. The text of the agreement is extremely vague and can be interpreted in many ways. If read one way, ACTA does not endanger your freedom. If read another way, ACTA is the worst thing that has ever happened and will be used to take away your freedom and to crush the internet as we know it.

Supporters of ACTA are saying that each country, which ratifies ACTA, will choose their own interpretation. This is the biggest lie ever told.

Just like any other international agreement ACTA must be interpreted according to the Vienna Convention of 1969.

Article 32 of the Vienna Convention says that if any part of a treaty is ambiguous it must be interpreted based on documents produced during the drafting and negotiations phase of the agreement. For Acta these documents are classified and have never been made available to the public through official sources. Such secrecy has never surrounded any other global treaty in modern times.

In essence the true meaning of ACTA is being kept secret even from the governments who sign it.

Our friends at Wikileaks have obtained a small portion of these secret documents and their content is chilling. When all major governments of the world have signed and ratified ACTA, the secret documents will be gradually made public and the true meaning of ACTA will be revealed to the nations of the world.

Article 27 of the Vienna Convention says that all international treaties take precedence over any internal laws. The secret parts of ACTA will take precedence over any national laws. Governments will have no choice. Citizens will have no choice. The internet, as we know it, will end.

The last major obstacle in ACTA’s path is the European Parliament. In June 2012 the European Parliament will have its final vote on ACTA. If they vote to ratify ACTA, the world, as we know it, will end. Your freedoms will gradually disappear. Your internet will be gradually turned into a controlled, censored channel where you can only view content produced by a handful of companies.

ACTA is a declaration of war against every man, woman, and child on this planet.

If you are a politician, and you defend ACTA, you are guilty of treason of the highest degree and we will deal with you as such.

We will defeat ACTA.
We will not be silenced.
We will take to the streets.
We will take back our governments.
We are Anonymous.
We are legion.
We do not forgive.
We do not forget.
Expect us.”

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
01-30-2012, 05:24 PM
“Greetings, world. We are Anonymous.

We are here to reveal to you an arcane legal trick, which will be used to take away your freedom starting in June 2012.

Your governments have been secretly negotiating the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement or ACTA as it is known.

The title is misleading.

The true goal of ACTA is to crush the internet, as we know it, and to take away your freedom.

We and other good people of this Earth have been pointing out a major problem with ACTA. The text of the agreement is extremely vague and can be interpreted in many ways. If read one way, ACTA does not endanger your freedom. If read another way, ACTA is the worst thing that has ever happened and will be used to take away your freedom and to crush the internet as we know it.

Supporters of ACTA are saying that each country, which ratifies ACTA, will choose their own interpretation. This is the biggest lie ever told.

Just like any other international agreement ACTA must be interpreted according to the Vienna Convention of 1969.

Article 32 of the Vienna Convention says that if any part of a treaty is ambiguous it must be interpreted based on documents produced during the drafting and negotiations phase of the agreement. For Acta these documents are classified and have never been made available to the public through official sources. Such secrecy has never surrounded any other global treaty in modern times.

In essence the true meaning of ACTA is being kept secret even from the governments who sign it.

Our friends at Wikileaks have obtained a small portion of these secret documents and their content is chilling. When all major governments of the world have signed and ratified ACTA, the secret documents will be gradually made public and the true meaning of ACTA will be revealed to the nations of the world.

Article 27 of the Vienna Convention says that all international treaties take precedence over any internal laws. The secret parts of ACTA will take precedence over any national laws. Governments will have no choice. Citizens will have no choice. The internet, as we know it, will end.

The last major obstacle in ACTA’s path is the European Parliament. In June 2012 the European Parliament will have its final vote on ACTA. If they vote to ratify ACTA, the world, as we know it, will end. Your freedoms will gradually disappear. Your internet will be gradually turned into a controlled, censored channel where you can only view content produced by a handful of companies.

ACTA is a declaration of war against every man, woman, and child on this planet.

If you are a politician, and you defend ACTA, you are guilty of treason of the highest degree and we will deal with you as such.

We will defeat ACTA.
We will not be silenced.
We will take to the streets.
We will take back our governments.
We are Anonymous.
We are legion.
We do not forgive.
We do not forget.
Expect us.”

well i strongly suspected that as much when the 3rd ugly sister of this censoring the net stuff reared its ugly head and someone sent me a email telling me about it minus the date and the anon stuff

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
01-31-2012, 04:54 PM
"A direct assault on Internet users" is what the ACLU is calling it. A U.S. House committee has already approved HR 1981, a broad new Internet snooping bill.
And get this -- it's also authored by SOPA sponsor Lamar Smith.
They want to force Internet service providers to keep track of and retain their customers' information -- including your name, address, phone number, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, and temporarily-assigned IP addresses.
The Internet blew away the insiders with our work against SOPA. Let's do it again this time:
Please click here to urge your lawmakers to oppose the snooping bill -- it's already passed through committee. (http://act.demandprogress.org/go/469?akid=1191.1546738.60q1A6&t=2)
The ACLU, EFF, Demand Progress, and 25 other civil liberties and privacy groups have expressed our opposition to this legislation. Will you join us, by emailing your lawmakers today? Just use the form at right.

ISPs would collect and retain your data whether or not you're accused of a crime. Supporters shamelessly dubbed it the "Protecting Children From Internet Pornographers Act," but our staunchest allies in Congress are calling it what it is: an all-encompassing Internet snooping bill.

Rep. Zoe Lofgren of California -- a SOPA hero who also led Democratic opposition to this bill -- said, "It represents a data bank of every digital act by every American [that would] let us find out where every single American visited Web sites."http://act.demandprogress.org/letter/snooping/?akid=1191.1546738.60q1A6&rd=1&t=1

alkemical
02-02-2012, 05:55 AM
http://disinfo.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/operation_black_march.jpg

alkemical
02-02-2012, 06:01 AM
http://www.disinfo.com/2012/02/anonymouss-black-march-media-survival-guide/

Anonymous’s ‘Black March’ Media Survival Guide

The following is by no means an exhaustive list of sources to help you remain entertained while participating in the Black March Boycotts.

Video

Internet Archive: Moving Images
Creative Commons Video Section
OpenFlix
The Open Video Project
Public Domain Comedy Video
Public Domain Torrents
Public.Resource.org
Wikipedia list of films in the Public Domain

Audio / Music / Sound

Internet Archive: Audio
Creative Commons Audio Section
Free Music Archive
Public Domain Sounds
MusOpen
LibriVox (Public Domain Audio Books)

Text / Books / Magazines / Literature

Internet Archive: Books & Text
Project Guteberg
Creative Commons Books Section
Authorama
Internet Public Library
Feedbooks
Baen Free Library
Bartleby
The University of Oxford Text Archive

Kaylore
02-02-2012, 08:46 AM
Dear Mr. Khan:



Thank you for taking the time to contact me to share your concerns regarding internet censorship. I appreciate your thoughts on this issue and the opportunity to respond.



The world is interconnected to a degree that was unimaginable a few short decades ago. The internet, coupled with mobile electronic devices, has provided people throughout the world an instant connection to information and materials from across the globe. An unfortunate byproduct of this increased interconnectedness and availability of information is infringement on intellectual property. The individuals or groups who perpetrate these crimes have little respect for the work that went into establishing this property and laws governing its use.



There are currently two pieces of legislation in Congress designed to address these issues. Senate Resolution 968, the Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property (Protect IP or PIPA) Act of 2011, was introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy on May 12, 2011. House Resolution 3261, the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), was introduced by Representative Lamar Smith on October 26, 2011. These bills authorize the attorney general to prosecute Internet sites which violate intellectual property rights, including non-domestic sites. The stated purpose of S. 968 and H.R. 3261 is to reinforce intellectual property rights standards across international borders.



The Protect IP Act was pulled from the Senate calendar by Majority Leader Harry Reid. As a Member of the House of Representatives, I will not vote on this bill, or an alternative piece of legislation, should it be scheduled for a vote in the future. The SOPA Act has been referred to the House Judiciary Committee where it currently is being amended by the full committee.



While I believe that it is important that the intellectual property of Americans be protected, as with any such sweeping legislation we must always be wary of unintended negative consequences. SOPA may have the best of intentions to protect property rights and copyrighted materials from illegal use, but the possible restriction of free speech and burdensome regulations on the activities of legitimate websites, many of which are small businesses, force me to oppose the bill.



Thank you again, Christopher, for taking the time to contact me. For more information on my work in Congress on your behalf, please sign up for my newsletter at https://forms.house.gov/coffman/webforms/enews.html.





Sincerely,

Mike Coffman
Member of Congress

alkemical
02-02-2012, 08:48 AM
lol, seems like mine used the same template.

;)

Kaylore
02-02-2012, 09:18 AM
lol, seems like mine used the same template.

;)

Whatever! He wrote this just for me!!!!!!

alkemical
02-02-2012, 10:34 AM
Whatever! He wrote this just for me!!!!!!

I have 3 reps I wrote, and Casey's was so close to yours it made me chuckle.

broncoblue
02-02-2012, 12:12 PM
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/02/sports-domains-seized?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=twitterclickthru

That One Guy
02-02-2012, 03:02 PM
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/02/sports-domains-seized?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=twitterclickthru

Federal authorities are taking .com, .org. and .net domains under the same civil-seizure law the government invokes to seize brick-and-mortar drug houses, bank accounts and other property tied to alleged illegal activity. The feds are able to seize the domains because Verisign, which controls the .net and .com names, and the Public Interest Registry, which runs .org, are U.S.-based organizations. Under civil forfeiture laws, the person losing the property has to prove that the items were not used to commit crimes.

Wow... I didn't know they could do this. This could get messy.

alkemical
02-07-2012, 07:02 AM
http://publicintelligence.net/do-you-like-online-privacy-you-may-be-a-terrorist/

Do You Like Online Privacy? You May Be a Terrorist

alkemical
02-07-2012, 07:07 AM
http://info.publicintelligence.net/FBI-SuspiciousActivity/Internet_Cafe.pdf

BroncoFanatic
02-13-2012, 09:50 AM
It will be brought back under a new name, or umbrella bill, like cyber security

http://www.webpronews.com/harry-reid-sopa-cybersecurity-2012-02

Whether or not this particular story is correct, they will keep trying. Part of that "heavy lifting", we have to keep watching for it

BroncoBuff
02-13-2012, 02:58 PM
They're getting medieval on the MegaUpload.com founders ...

Siezed their assets, their homes, and have denied them bail ........






http://m.wsj.net/video/20120120/012012digitskimdotcom/012012digitskimdotcom_512x288.jpg
Megaupload.com founder Kim Dotcom at bail hearing Tuesday

Megaupload co-founder denied bail by court

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom's bail application appeal has been rejected in New Zealand.

The High Court in Auckland said it agreed with an earlier ruling that Mr Dotcom - a German national - might try to flee the country.

The file-sharing site creator is accused of profiting from the copying and distribution of pirated content. Mr Dotcom's lawyers said that he denied the charge and would fight an extradition application by the US.

'Go to hell'
Lawyers representing the US authorities also said that a man with a history of making fake travel documents had unsuccessfully asked to visit Mr Dotcom following his arrest.

Mr Dotcom's said he had no intention of running away. He said he wanted to be with his pregnant wife and fight to get his assets unfrozen. He also denied all knowledge of the rejected visitor.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-16869788

BroncoBuff
02-13-2012, 03:34 PM
This is what you see at www.megaupload.com




http://megaupload.com/banner.jpg

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
02-13-2012, 04:53 PM
well i guess due process is dead then again it is the uk

alkemical
02-14-2012, 10:02 AM
**** you, eh!

http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/8vsZ2n48f5g/canadian-mp-if-you-oppose-war.html

Canadian MP: if you oppose warrantless snooping, you "stand with child pornographers"
from Boing Boing by Cory Doctorow
Vic Toews, the Canadian Tory MP pushing for the new spying bill says that people who oppose him are "standing with child pornographers." Mr Toews's bill will require ISPs to record all your online activity and give police access to those logs without a warrant. Ontario police recently busted a huge child-porn ring without needing any further spying power. In fact, no one can find any police investigation that has failed for lack of snooping powers. A leaked memo from the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police shows that Canada's law enforcement has been scouring its records for evidence supporting the need for this bill, without luck. (Thanks, Wild Rumpus!)

BroncoFanatic
02-14-2012, 10:45 AM
**** you, eh!

http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/8vsZ2n48f5g/canadian-mp-if-you-oppose-war.html

Canadian MP: if you oppose warrantless snooping, you "stand with child pornographers"
from Boing Boing by Cory Doctorow
Vic Toews, the Canadian Tory MP pushing for the new spying bill says that people who oppose him are "standing with child pornographers." Mr Toews's bill will require ISPs to record all your online activity and give police access to those logs without a warrant. Ontario police recently busted a huge child-porn ring without needing any further spying power. In fact, no one can find any police investigation that has failed for lack of snooping powers. A leaked memo from the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police shows that Canada's law enforcement has been scouring its records for evidence supporting the need for this bill, without luck. (Thanks, Wild Rumpus!)

The excuse is always either "to keep us safe" or "for the children". Disgusting propoganda tactics to get people to give up freedoms.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. - Ben Franklin

DAN_BRONCO_FAN
02-14-2012, 03:07 PM
wow the government will use any excuse to take away your freedoms what about phone conversations someone could be talking about molesting a child lets tap everyones phones but lets not stop there lets bug everyones home .matter of fact to be safe lets drag everyone to the police station and lock them away to be totally safe.

alkemical
02-29-2012, 06:37 AM
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120223/15102217856/key-techdirt-sopapipa-post-censored-bogus-dmca-takedown-notice.shtml

James from New America Foundation sez, "Mike Masnick has done an incredible job covering copyright issues and the SOPA debates at Techdirt but today he had a troubling post: an important post on why SOPA/PIPA are misguided has been removed from Google over a DCMA request. Mike writes:"

We've talked a lot about how copyright law and the DMCA can be abused to take down legitimate, non-infringing content, interfering with one's free speech rights. And we're always brushed off by copyright maximalists, who insist that any complaints about taking down legitimate speech are overblown.

So isn't it interesting that we've just discovered that our own key anti-SOPA blog post and discussion... have been blocked thanks to a bogus DMCA takedown?

alkemical
02-29-2012, 09:57 AM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46563165/ns/technology_and_science-security/?ocid=twitter#.T021Rmya5DN

http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/DTOm2qKVvX8/sopas-author-wants-everythin.html


Lamar Smith (R-TX), author of the ill-starred SOPA Internet regulation, has an even dumber idea for the Internet. In the name of fighting child pornography, he wants to force ISPs to log everything you do online, then make it available to police and government agents without a warrant. Leslie Meredith has a writeup on the mounting opposition to Smith's latest act of unconstitutional lunacy:

However, under Smith’s bill, records of both suspects and ordinary citizens would all be available to any government agency at any time, no warrant required.

"This type of legislation goes against the fundamental values of our country where individuals are treated as innocent until proven guilty," Reitman said. "H.R. 1981 would uproot this core American principle, forcing ISPs to treat everyone like a potential criminal."

The bill has been forwarded from committee to the full House of Representatives for consideration, which is expected later this year. There is no sign of a Senate version at this time.

If the past is any indicator, Smith may be in for a hard fight with activists. He was also sponsor of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) bill that would have shut off access to foreign websites accused of hosting pirated content. But he was forced to withdraw the legislation after massive protests by many of the same opponents who likewise thought the remedy was too harsh for the problem.

alkemical
04-18-2012, 07:17 AM
http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/-0EmQQo4il4/sopatrack-an-app-to-show-conn.html

SOPATrack: an app to show connections between campaign donations and voting records
from Boing Boing by Cory Doctorow

Smita sez,

While there are many resources out there to help citizens learn more about how much money gov't officials are accepting from special interest groups, I wanted to call out SopaTrack as it is the first of its kind that enables people to easily and quickly look up how elected officials are voting on a particular issue, enabling voters to be more educated and aware as they hit the ballots. For this broader issue and problem, for the first time, there is an app for that :)

In a nutshell, SopaTrack highlights how elected officials are voting on specific issues -- with a focus on how often they vote for or against the money. With the recent fight against SOPA demonstrating how potent and motivated the digital community is in holding elected officials accountable, and with CISPA quickly creeping onto the national stage, SopaTrack demonstrates the next way of digital activism and grass-roots campaigning. Originally, SopaTrack was created to help provide facts around the then one-sided discussion around SOPA that was quickly turned around by alarmed citizens like Randy Meech.

The data for this comes from Maplight and Sunlight Labs.

Sopatrack - Check how Congress Votes with the Money

alkemical
04-18-2012, 07:20 AM
http://craphound.com/images/6721675129_88e8571289_z.jpg

alkemical
04-18-2012, 07:22 AM
Why a pro-SOPA MPAA technologist changed sides and went to work for ISOC (http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/HECJedrOguo/why-a-pro-sopa-mpaa-technologi.html)

BroncoFanatic
04-18-2012, 07:33 AM
It should be no surprise, but the scumbags in DC just come out with a new version of the same garbage. This one possibly worse than SOPA.

Meet CISPA
http://digitaljournal.com/article/322396

Tombstone RJ
04-18-2012, 11:20 AM
I don't want to fully take this WRP level but this is the kind of stuff you get when you ask a government to manage every aspect of your life. The country needs a mindset change and these are merely symptoms of the problem, not the entirety of it.

this.

It's like that stooooopid lady in the san fran area that forced the government to regulate the McDonald's menue because she could not control her kids. Instead of simply telling her children "no" or cooking a freaking meal, she gets the gobment to intervene.

stooooooooopid!!

Well, the morons in the frisco gubment were only too happy to oblige.

Tombstone RJ
04-18-2012, 11:29 AM
<IFRAME style="POSITION: absolute; WIDTH: 10px; HEIGHT: 10px; TOP: -9999em" id=twttrHubFrame tabIndex=0 src="http://platform.twitter.com/widgets/hub.1324331373.html" frameBorder=0 allowTransparency scrolling=no></IFRAME>I'll be a naysayer....

-In the decade since peer-to-peer (p2p) file-sharing site Napster emerged in 1999, music sales in the U.S. have dropped 47 percent, from $14.6 billion to $7.7 billion.
-From 2004 through 2009 alone, approximately 30 billion songs were illegally downloaded on file-sharing networks.
-NPD reports that only 37 percent of music acquired by U.S. consumers in 2009 was paid for.
-Frontier Economics recently estimated (http://www.iccwbo.org/uploadedFiles/BASCAP/Pages/Global%20Impacts%20-%20Final.pdf) that U.S. Internet users annually consume between $7 and $20 billion worth of digitally pirated recorded music.
-According to the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (http://riaa.org/blog.php?content_selector=How_Digital_Piracy_Harms _Everyone), the digital theft of music, movies and copyrighted content takes up huge amounts of Internet bandwidth – 24 percent globally, and 17.5 percent in the U.S.
-Digital storage locker downloads constitute 7 percent of all Internet traffic, while 91 percent of the links found on them were for copyrighted material, and 10 percent of those links were to music specifically, according to a 2011 Envisional study (http://documents.envisional.com/docs/Envisional-Internet_Usage-Jan2011.pdf).
While the music business has increased its digital revenues by 1,000 percent from 2004 to 2010, digital music theft has been a major factor behind the overall global market decline of around 31 percent in the same period. And although use of peer-to-peer sites has flattened during recent years, other forms of digital theft are emerging, most notably digital storage lockers used to distribute copyrighted music.

http://www.riaa.com/faq.php

For the single movie on which they had data, they estimate that piracy directly destroyed $40 million in box office revenue. Overall, the film grossed approximately $61 million or around $600/pirate source. (7)



Assuming that De Vany and Wall’s data is representative of a typical movie with typical levels of piracy which seems reasonable to me, it’s possible that 40% of box office revenue of a typical film is being lost to piracy.


If the film industry takes in roughly $10 billion per year in box office sales, we could estimate that piracy costs the film industry $3-4 billion annually, which is a range constructed from both academic and MPAA research. The primary mechanism of this lost revenue is through box office sales rather than DVD sales.
http://www.quora.com/How-much-income-does-the-film-industry-lose-to-piracy

That's just music and film. I am not saying we should pass this bill in its current form, but clearly something needs to be done about billions of dollars in theft. And all you boys livin in yer momma's basement that think it is your right to steal/download **** you haven't paid for... just think if you were the guys who got stolen from. And this is coming from someone who has a general disdain for the entertainment industry.

Yep, there's lots of stealing going on. If the entertainment industry wants money why don't they provide this crap for like $.25c a dowload?

They are too damn greedy to do this, that's why.

So instead, some idiot goes into a movie theatre with a digital camara, records the movie and then puts it out onto the interwebz for jackholes to watch.

Bronco Yoda
04-18-2012, 11:29 AM
It should be no surprise, but the scumbags in DC just come out with a new version of the same garbage. This one possibly worse than SOPA.

Meet CISPA
http://digitaljournal.com/article/322396

Good God. Is this a joke?

...sadly it's not

alkemical
04-18-2012, 11:32 AM
Yep, there's lots of stealing going on. If the entertainment industry wants money why don't they provide this crap for like $.25c a dowload?

They are too damn greedy to do this, that's why.

So instead, some idiot goes into a movie theatre with a digital camara, records the movie and then puts it out onto the interwebz for jackholes to watch.

The thing about it...is many 'artists' (bands, comedians, etc) have worked with non-drm releases to "amazing success!".

the one problem with things legislation like these, is it actually KILLS creativity & innovation. They don't understand that piracy is never going to go away. You can fight it - but at the same time, the more people who get exposed to the product, eventually buy it.

lonestar
04-18-2012, 11:33 AM
this.

It's like that stooooopid lady in the san fran area that forced the government to regulate the McDonald's menue because she could not control her kids. Instead of simply telling her children "no" or cooking a freaking meal, she gets the gobment to intervene.

stooooooooopid!!

Well, the morons in the frisco gubment were only too happy to oblige.

HEll it is California what doyou expect.. BTW loads of those morons are moving to Colorado get ready for the same stupid crap..

Jetmeck
04-18-2012, 11:36 AM
simple to cure this kind of BS............pick up the phone and bitch out the senator or representative who even considers supporting such things. I am the phone regularly to mine.

If more people actually give a chit about the chit going on in this country and got involved this kind of stuff would be crushed instantly.............get off your ass and pick up the phone..............

alkemical
04-18-2012, 11:38 AM
simple to cure this kind of BS............pick up the phone and b**** out the senator or representative who even considers supporting such things. I am the phone regularly to mine.

If more people actually give a chit about the chit going on in this country and got involved this kind of stuff would be crushed instantly.............get off your ass and pick up the phone..............

https://encrypted-tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT2GQQmcK9NJG2apOh7uz6IIZliekJDT JLchlklbBGaJqprW0kBEQ

Tombstone RJ
04-18-2012, 11:40 AM
HEll it is California what doyou expect.. BTW loads of those morons are moving to Colorado get ready for the same stupid crap..

the asshats from Cali have been flooding CO for the better part of 30 years. They move away from Cali because it's a nightmare to live there. Then they move to CO and try to turn it into CA. It's so sad.

alkemical
04-18-2012, 11:42 AM
the asshats from Cali have been flooding CO for the better part of 30 years. They move away from Cali because it's a nightmare to live there. Then they move to CO and try to turn it into CA. It's so sad.

I'm trying to turn the state i'm in now, into a COish state.

Tombstone RJ
04-18-2012, 11:44 AM
I'm trying to turn the state i'm in now, into a COish state.

which state is that?

Drunk Monkey
04-18-2012, 01:06 PM
simple to cure this kind of BS............pick up the phone and b**** out the senator or representative who even considers supporting such things. I am the phone regularly to mine.

If more people actually give a chit about the chit going on in this country and got involved this kind of stuff would be crushed instantly.............get off your ass and pick up the phone..............

This. I interned for a senator in DC one summer. In the mail room all mail is divided into issues pro and against. It was compiled into a report and shown to the senator every day. We had call sheets that did the same thing for phone calls. I never thought it made a difference until I had that job.

alkemical
04-19-2012, 05:31 AM
This. I interned for a senator in DC one summer. In the mail room all mail is divided into issues pro and against. It was compiled into a report and shown to the senator every day. We had call sheets that did the same thing for phone calls. I never thought it made a difference until I had that job.

Do the Decision Makers actually pay attention to this data?

p7superfly
04-19-2012, 11:07 AM
First net tiering, and now this.

We're going to have to fight for the rest of our lives to protect Internet rights from ****ing idiots who have no understanding of the Internet itself.

They will just keep trying, buying more congress people, and repackaging it.

Basically, we need to aggressively drum out the people who even accept money from these guys. It's both parties, too.

alkemical
04-19-2012, 12:10 PM
lets create a mesh network!

alkemical
04-19-2012, 12:12 PM
First net tiering, and now this.

We're going to have to fight for the rest of our lives to protect Internet rights from ****ing idiots who have no understanding of the Internet itself.

They will just keep trying, buying more congress people, and repackaging it.

Basically, we need to aggressively drum out the people who even accept money from these guys. It's both parties, too.

http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/bQmlSRqiw9w/hilary-clinton-to-world-govern.html


Hilary Clinton to world governments: the world will divide into "open" and "closed" societies based on their Internet policies


from Boing Boing by Cory Doctorow

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has repeated her view that the world's governments should respect Internet freedom, telling the Brasilia Open Government Summit that the world is dividing into "open" and "closed" societies characterized by their attitude towards net freedom. It's a laudable sentiment, but as they say, "We know you love freedom, we just wish you'd share." After all, America is one of the world's leading exporters of Internet censorship and surveillance laws (in the form of its intervention into copyright laws, as well as instigating unaccountable, secret copyright treaty negotiations like ACTA and TPP. They're also the world's leading exporter of Internet surveillance and censorship technology, thanks first to the US national requirement that telcoms companies buy equipment that allows for direct police surveillance, and the aggressive sale of this surveillance and control technology to the world's dictatorship by US firms.

​Speaking at the inaugural meeting of the Open Government Partnership in Brasilia, she said countries could only become more secure and peaceful if they were open. "In the 21st century, the US is convinced that one of the most significant divisions between nations will be not between east or west, nor over religion, so much as between open and closed societies," she said.

​"We believe those governments that hide from public view and dismiss ideas of openness and the aspirations of their people for greater freedom will find it increasingly difficult to create a secure society."

It's particularly galling that Secretary Clinton made these remarks even as the US Congress is poised to pass CISPA, which establishes a national US regime of censorship and warrantless surveillance.

Open or closed society is key dividing line of 21st century, says Hillary Clinton

(Image: Clinton Rally 90, a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike (2.0) image from kakissel's photostream)

Arkie
04-21-2012, 10:16 AM
This coming week, Congress is set to take up another so-called "cybersecurity" bill, H.R. 3523, the "Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011" (CISPA).

And this time, many of those who joined us to stop SOPA and PIPA are supporting this legislation.

Republicans and Democrats have introduced at least four major "cybersecurity" bills since then.

Expanding government power is always bipartisan.

CISPA, sponsored by Rep. Mike Rogers (MI-8), is promoted as a harmless bill that will enable voluntary "information sharing" between private corporations and government agencies in the name of "cybersecurity."

Unfortunately, it would allow the transfer of vast amounts of data, including information like your Internet browsing history or email content, to any agency in the federal government, including non-civilian agencies such as the National Security Agency or the Department of Defense Cyber Command.

One major problem with these alleged "cybersecurity" bills is their overly broad focus on what information private companies are encouraged to share with federal agencies.

CISPA currently contains no incentive for private companies like Facebook or Google to remove personally identifiable information from data they share.

In addition, the way this legislation is drafted, it currently overrides privacy presumptions found in the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, and the Communications Act regarding the privacy of an individual's online communications and related records.

Essentially, CISPA would deem all existing privacy laws null and void for "cybersecurity" purposes.

Once the government has this information, there are no meaningful restrictions on its use, as its only qualifier is that it must be related to "cybersecurity" or to protect "national security."

Hamrob
04-21-2012, 01:50 PM
Stuff like this will never pass. Hopefully, it doesn't get a bunch of parnoid web site owners to implement unnecessary and stringent policies that make sites not worth spending time on.

This isn't something that it would be wise to be an early adoptor of.

Those are my thoughts anyway!

alkemical
04-30-2012, 07:52 AM
Clearly another attempt at sharing personal information of American taxpayers. Hopefully the Democrat controlled Congress will block it.

--------------------------------------------------------------------
CISPA: the controversy surrounding it and how it might affect you (http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/cispa-controversy-surrounding-might-affect-173913974.html)
By Rachel Rose Hartman | The Ticket

While much of America was gearing up to watch the NFL draft picks Thursday night, the House of Representatives passed a controversial cybersecurity bill to increase information sharing between private companies and the federal government.

The bill—H.R. 3523, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA)—passed at 6:30 p.m. by 248 to 168, boosted by a Republican majority (206 Republicans voted for it, along with 42 Democrats). Debate on the bill was expected Thursday, but the vote was a surprise because it had been scheduled for Friday.

Here's a look at the controversy surrounding the bill, what's in store for its future and how it might affect you:

http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/XxEHp3L53SsKOVKzCymV1Q--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTYzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en/blogs/theticket/108535836.jpg

Check out our explainer below to find out more about CISPA:

• What is the purpose of CISPA? Michigan Republican Rep. Mike Rogers and Maryland Democratic Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger sponsored and, along with supporters, crafted CISPA to offer private companies new ways to protect themselves from potential economic cyberspies hailing from countries such as Russia and China. To accomplish this, the bill amends the National Security Act of 1947 (which contains no cyberthreat provisions) to increase information-sharing permission between U.S. businesses and the federal government. Supporters say information regarding cyberthreats will be more quickly and easily disseminated under CISPA.

• Why is it controversial? Opponents aren't arguing against discussing cyberthreats, but they're concerned about the scope of sharing and privacy issues. Under CISPA, companies will be permitted to share information with entities such as the Department of Homeland Security and the National Security Agency and won't be required to protect Internet users' personal data. The shared information is supposed to be related to cyberthreats, but many opponents argue that term is too broad and offers too many exemptions to current privacy laws.

• How does CISPA differ from SOPA? CISPA has been dubbed "the new SOPA," in reference to the Stop Online Piracy Act, a bill designed to curb copyright infringement by restricting sites that host pirated content. Congressional action on SOPA was postponed Jan. 20 after fierce protests from technology companies and others. SOPA centered around piracy, while CISPA is about cybersecurity. And while SOPA cracked down on domestic sites, CISPA is focused on overseas entities. Constitutional rights advocates, civil liberties groups and others oppose both bills. Unlike with SOPA, many tech companies, such as Facebook and Microsoft, support CISPA. The bill has already advanced in one chamber of Congress with a majority of support after amendments were added to define cyberthreats.

• Who opposes and who supports CISPA?

Against: The American Civil Liberties Union and other advocacy groups such as the Sunlight Foundation, the American Library Association and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are staunchly opposed to CISPA as a potential threat to Americans' constitutional rights. The White House on Wednesday threatened to veto the bill in part over privacy issues and has backed a competing cybersecurity bill offered in the Senate. A majority of House Democrats and 28 Republicans voted against the bill Thursday due to privacy issues and other factors. Rep. Ron Paul of Texas voted no on the bill, saying on Monday that it would create a "Big Brother" culture.

For: Many companies and groups including Facebook, AT&T, Intel, Microsoft, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the conservative Heritage Foundation and tech associations back CISPA as an effective way to combat overseas cyberthreats. Select members of Congress support CISPA for the same reason.

• What is the future of CISPA? Don't expect the Democratic-controlled Senate to rush to pass CISPA after the White House's veto threat. In addition to the president's opposition, CISPA must now compete with the Senate's own cybersecurity legislation.

================================================== ==

https://www.eff.org/sites/default/files/features/cispa-front-1b.jpg
April 26, 2012 | By Rainey Reitman
EFF Condemns CISPA, Vows to Take Fight to the Senate (https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/04/eff-condemns-cispa-vows-take-fight-senate)

Hours ago, the House of Representatives voted to approve the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), a bill that would allow companies to bypass all existing privacy law to spy on communications and pass sensitive user data to the government. EFF condemns the vote in the House and vows to continue the fight in the Senate.

"As the Senate takes up the issue of cybersecurity in the coming weeks, civil liberties will be a central issue. We must do everything within our power to safeguard the privacy rights of individual Internet users and ensure that Congress does not sacrifice those rights in a rush to pass vaguely-worded cybersecurity bills," said Lee Tien, EFF Senior Staff Attorney.

"Hundreds of thousands of Internet users spoke out against this bill, and their numbers will only grow as we move this debate to the Senate. We will not stand idly by as the basic freedoms to read and speak online without the shadow of government surveillance are endangered by such overbroad legislative proposals," said Rainey Reitman, EFF Activism Director.

EFF extends its deep gratitude to the dozens of organizations that have worked with us on this campaign and the tens of thousand of EFF members who helped us by contacting Congress to oppose CISPA. We look forward to continuing to fight by your side in defense of civil liberties as CISPA moves to the Senate.

..

BroncoFanatic
09-11-2012, 08:18 AM
Another international criminal mastermind has been brought to justice
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57504842-93/pirate-bay-co-founder-warg-arrested-in-cambodia/


/sarcasm